Séminaire distingués

LiDAR for Autonomous Vehicles in China

Prof. Dr. Zhengxi Cheng,
Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/936686006

Abstract: Autonomous vehicles are a revolution to the traditional vehicle industry, where the key component lies in the Lidar for the self-driving cars. In recent years, quite a lot of Lidar start-up companies emerge in China. With the direct help from these Chinese Lidar companies and industry consulting companies, I will present the current developments of the mechanical and the solid-state Lidars for autonomous vehicles in China. A bold forecast for the bright future will be also discussed.

Bio: Zhengxi Cheng received M.Sc. degree in microelectronics and solid-state electronics from Fudan University in 2007 and Ph.D. degree in microelectronics and solid-state electronics from Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2012. Since 2007, he has worked in Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics. He has been promoted to an Associate Professor since 2013. From 2015 to 2017, he was a visiting researcher with the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Japan. His research is focused on opto-electronic integrated circuit, optical MEMS devices technology.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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AI-enhanced vision: seeing the invisible

Prof. Dr. George Barbastathis,
MIT


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/506874457

Abstract: If you point your camera to a scene, and the camera registers nothing—does it mean that nothing was really there? Hardly! The camera pixels measure “raw” light intensity where the encoded information often is much richer than a human observer could tell just by looking at the pixels on a screen. Which algorithms, then, should one apply to decode the raw intensity and reveal the hidden scene?
In this seminar, I will describe how to use Deep Neural Networks (DNNs), a form of Machine Learning (ML) algorithm, to perform this decoding. During the training stage of the DNN, physically generated objects are used to produce the encoded raw intensities. From these pairs of objects and raw intensities the DNN learns the association between the scenes and their encoded representations. After training, given a new scene, the DNN decodes it correctly to produce a final reconstructed image that is meaningful to a human observer.
With my research group, we applied this approach to three challenging instances of invisibility: transparent objects, also known as “phase objects,” whose raw intensities are highly rippled diffraction patterns; phase objects that are also very dark, i.e. the diffraction patterns are also highly attenuated; and objects hidden behind or surrounded by diffusers, e.g. frosted glass or multiple layers of glass patterned with sharp light-scattering features.
It is important to emphasize that in our work ML is not used in the traditional way to interpret the scenes; rather, it is used to form interpretable representations of scenes in situations where traditional ML would be helpless due to physical limitations in the optics. The cooperation of ML with physical models proved to be very powerful in this work and, beyond, is certain to impact many fundamental and applied aspects of physical and life sciences and engineering.

Bio: George Barbastathis received the Diploma in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1993 from the National Technical University of Athens (Πολυτεχνείο) and the MSc and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1994 and 1997, respectively, from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech.) After post-doctoral work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, he joined the faculty at MIT in 1999, where he is now Professor of Mechanical Engineering. He has worked or held visiting appointments at Harvard University, the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre, the National University of Singapore, and the University of Michigan – Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute (密西根交大學院) in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. His research interests are in machine learning and optimization for computational imaging and inverse problems; and optical system design, including artificial optical materials and interfaces. He is member of the Society for Photo Instrumentation Engineering (SPIE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE), and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). In 2010 he was elected Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) and in 2015 he was a recipient of China’s Top Foreign Scholar (“One Thousand Scholar”) Award.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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Low Frequency Wireless Power Transfer for Biomedical Implants

Prof. Dr. Shad Roundy,
University of Utah


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/975059431

Abstract: Biomedical implants hold the promise of dramatically improving our health and well-being by, for example, enabling us to pro-actively monitor health through real-time tracking of internal body chemistry (e.g. pH, glucose, lactate, tissue oxygen), treat diseases through targeted and tailored drug delivery, treat neural disorders through neural prostheses, etc.  Furthermore, advances in flexible integrated circuit technology and micro scale sensing can currently enable extremely small (< 1mm3), complex, biomedical implants.  However, systems of this size are almost never actually realized because the power system (e.g. a battery) is too large.  RF power transmission for implants has been widely investigated. However, for very small implants (~ mm3) RF power suffers from low achievable power density at the implant given safety constraints.
This talk will discuss two alternative methods for wirelessly delivering power to biomedical implants: acoustics and low frequency magnetic fields using magnetoelectric transducers. Acoustic power transmission exhibits high power density given its low attenuation in soft tissue and relatively less restrictive safety limitations. Its disadvantages are that acoustic power does not travel well through bone and the external transmitter requires intimate contact with skin. In this talk we will cover acoustic power transmission systems and demonstrate a novel glucose sensing mechanism that can be powered acoustically. Low frequency magnetic fields coupled to magnetoelectric transducers offer a promising alternative to both RF and acoustic power transmission. In this system, a standard coil is used as a transmitter, but the implantable receiver is made from magnetoelectric laminates (i.e. laminates of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric material). The magnetoelectric receivers have a much more favorable frequency/size relationship than standard RF receivers, enabling higher power density at lower frequencies that are safer for humans and have lower attenuation in tissue. In this talk I will discuss system and receiver design optimization for magnetoelectric based wireless power transfer systems. These systems are still early stage, and there is much room for innovation and improvement.

Bio: Shad Roundy is the director of the Integrated Self-Powered Sensing lab at the University of Utah which focuses on energy harvesting, wireless power transfer, and more generally applications of ubiquitous wireless sensing. Shad received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2003.  From there he moved to the Australian National University where he was a senior lecturer in the Systems Engineering Department.  He spent the next several years working with startup companies LV Sensors and EcoHarvester developing MEMS pressure sensors, accelerometers, gyroscopes, and energy harvesting devices.  In 2012, he re-entered academia joining the mechanical engineering faculty at the University of Utah.  Dr. Roundy is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, DoE Integrated Manufacturing Fellowship, the Intel Noyce Fellowship, and was named by MIT’s Technology Review as one of the world’s top 100 young innovators for 2004.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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Perovskite Solar Cells and Modules: Some Challenges and Tools to deal with them

Prof. Dr. Klaus Weber,
Australian National University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/694326308

Abstract: Perovskite Cells are complex devices consisting of several components and interfaces. Understanding the properties and interactions of the different components is very challenging, particularly when there are so many options for each of them. It is important to develop suitable tools to deal with this challenge.
In this talk I will focus on several aspects of perovskite cells. First, I will  make the case that computational modelling is an essential tool for the interpretation of experimental data, by contrasting different possible explanations for measurements obtained by different means, which shows that a less than rigorous interpretation can add to confusion, rather than provide useful information.
Second, I will discuss simulations of perovskite and perovskite – silicon modules, which focus on the potential effects of partial shading. These simulations show that great care must be taken when designing such modules so as to ensure that shading conditions that may typically be encountered during operation does not permanently damage the module.
I will conclude with some suggestions and open questions around how it may be possible to better standardise and verify experimental results , to increase the usefulness of reported results in accelerating the development of practical perovskite solar devices.

Bio: Dr Klaus Weber is Associate Professor in the Research School of Engineering at the Australian National University (ANU). He co-invented and developed several thin film cell technologies including SLIVER technology, for which he was closely involved in the commercial development including the current ARENA project (formerly with Transform Solar). He has authored over over 140 publications. He is a recipient of the Weeks Award by the International Solar Energy Society and the Alan Walsh Medal for Service to Industry by the Australian Institute of Physics. His work on SLIVER technology received numerous other awards including the Banksia Award and the Aichi World Expo Global Eco-Tech 100 award.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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Exploring interfacial physics to inspire disrupting technologies

Prof. Dr. Dimos Poulikakos,
ETH Zürich


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/440644837

Abstract: Interfaces separating different kinds of matter, or different phases of the same matter, abandon in nature and technology. What is more, they invariably play a critical role in all systems where they occur, from regulating transport of energy and species, to dictating system shape and form. Interfaces differ in their structure and properties from the bulk matter they surround. I note here the famous quote of Wolfgang Pauli that “God made bulk (materials) but surfaces are the work of the devil”. Interfaces are of course of critical importance in small scale systems and even more so as we move toward nanoscales, where their proportion in a given system increases dramatically and their effect dominates system behaviour.

In this lecture I will primarily focus on liquid/gas and liquid/solid interfaces as they manifest themselves in simple systems, such as small droplets and nanoparticles, in particular when they are at a metastable thermodynamic state or under the regulated influence of an external field (gravitational, acoustic, electric or electromagnetic), showing in parallel novel applications deriving from understanding their physics.  

First, I will address the spontaneous removal of discrete condensed matter from surfaces, of importance in nature and in a broad range of technologies, e.g. self-cleaning, anti-icing, and condensation. The understanding of phenomena leading to such behavior, combined with rational micro/nano surface texture design promoting their manifestation, remain a challenge. I will show how water droplets resting on superhydrophobic surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behavior, i.e. sequential droplet-substrate collisions with restitution coefficients greater than unity, despite complete surface rigidity, seemingly violating the second law of thermodynamics. Due to the high-vaporization rates experienced by droplets, and the inherently associated significant cooling, freezing from a metastable state can occur. I will show how increasing vaporization —triggered suddenly by metastable state freezing— has a strong boosting effect and can spontaneously remove surface icing (by levitating or even launching away generated icy drops/particles) the moment they freeze. This work exemplifies how surface texturing aware of such interfacial phenomena alone, can prohibit water droplet retention on surfaces, also when they freeze.

Next, a remarkably simple process for the maskless direct printing of nanoparticles of all kinds, through electrohydrodynamic “NanoDrip” printing of colloidal nanodroplets will be presented and the related interfacial physics and transport phenomena leading to the tunable formation of in- and out-of-plane functional nanostructures as single entities or large arrays will be explained.  A host of applications enabled by NanoDrip printing will be discussed, ranging from plasmonics, driven by single photon emitters (quantum dots, or even precisely printed single organic molecules) to the printing of transparent conductive grids and to tracking force microscopy (TFM) methods for cells with unprecedented facility and resolution.

Finally, I will discuss the controllable manipulation of biological and synthetic nanoscopic species in liquids at the ultimate single object resolution (biological quantum level), important to many fields such as biology, medicine, physics, chemistry and nanoengineering. I will present the concept of electrokinetic nanovalving, with which we confine and guide single biological nano-objects in a liquid, solely based on spatiotemporal tailoring of the free energy landscape guiding the motion. The electric field generating this energy landscape is readily modulated collaboratively by wall nanotopography and by addressable embedded nanoelectrodes in a nanochannel. I will demonstrate guiding, confining, releasing and sorting of biological nano-objects, ranging from macromolecules to adenoviruses, but also a broad palette of other nano-objects such as lipid vesicles, dielectric and metallic particles, of various sizes and inherent charges, suspended in electrolytes with to biological buffer solution levels. Such systems can enable individual handling of multiple entities as well as simultaneously obtaining accurate information of the properties of their such as electrical conductivity and permittivity, in applications ranging from chemical or biochemical synthesis to precise drug delivery, in a continuous lab-on-chip environment with biological quantum level resolution.


Bio: Professor Dimos Poulikakos holds the Chair of Thermodynamics at ETH Zurich, where in 1996 he founded the Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies in the Institute of Energy Technology. He served as the Vice President of Research of ETH Zurich in the period 2005-2007. Professor Poulikakos was the ETH director of the IBM-ETH Binnig-Rohrer Nanotechnology center, a unique private-public partnership in nanotechnology at the interface of basic research and future oriented applications (2008-2011). He served as the Head of the Mechanical and Process Engineering Department at ETH Zurich (2011-2014). He is currently the Chairperson of the Energy Science Center of ETH Zurich and a member of CORE, the advisory board of the Swiss government on issues related to energy. As of January 2020, he is also the president of Division IV the of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) and member of the presiding board of SNF.

His research is in the area of interfacial transport phenomena, thermodynamics and related materials nanoengineering, with a host of related applications. The focus is on understanding the related physics, in particular at the micro- and nanoscales and employing this knowledge to the development of novel technologies. Specific current examples of application areas are the direct 2D and 3D printing of complex liquids and colloids with nanoscale feature size and resolution, the science-based design of supericephobic and omniphobic surfaces, the chip/transistor-level, bio-inspired 3D integrated cooling of supercomputer electronics, the development of facile methods based on plasmonics for sunlight management and the development of nanofluidic technologies and surface textures for biological applications under realistic fluidic environments (accelerated and guided cell adhesion, re-endothelialization, antifibrotic surface textures and materials, single virus trapping and transport).

Among the awards and recognitions he has received for his contributions are the White House/NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, the Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal in 1986, the Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Award in 1986, the University of Illinois Scholar Award in 1986 and the Reviewer of the Year Award for the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer in 1995. He is the recipient of the 2000 James Harry Potter Gold Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was a Russell S. Springer Professor of the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of California at Berkeley (2003) and the Hawkins Memorial Lecturer of Purdue University in 2004. He received the Heat Transfer Memorial Award for Science in 2003 from ASME. In 2008 he was a visiting Fellow at Oxford University and a distinguished visitor at the University of Tokyo.  He is the recipient of the 2009 Nusselt-Reynolds Prize of the World Assembly of Heat Transfer and Thermodynamics conferences (awarded every four years), for his scientific contributions. He is the 2012 recipient of the Max Jacob Award, for eminent scholarly achievement and distinguished leadership in the field of fluidics and heat transfer. Awarded annually to a scholar jointly by (ASME) and (AIChE), the Max Jacob Award is the highest honor in the field of thermofluidics these professional organizations bestow. He was presented with the Outstanding Engineering Alumnus Award of the University of Colorado in Boulder in 2012. He received the Dr.h.c. of the National Technical University of Athens in 2006. In 2008 he was elected to the Swiss National Academy of Engineering (SATW), where from 2012 to 2015 he also served as president of its science board.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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Towards elevated-temperature (>2 K) monolithic quantum computing processors in production FDSOI CMOS technology

Prof. Dr. Sorin Voinigescu
University of Toronto


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/682338354

Abstract: Universal quantum processors (QPs) “can now perform computations in a Hilbert space of dimension 253 ≈ 9 × 1015, beyond the reach of the fastest classical supercomputers available today.” Despite reaching this crucial milestone, they remain expensive, difficult-to-scale, room-size, laboratory devices that operate at extremely low temperature, require many hours of tweaking before use, and can only run simple quantum algorithms of limited practical use. Their core building block, the qubit, is based on exotic superconducting Josephson-junction technology and is controlled by racks of electronic equipment connected through long coaxial cables. For the next phase of QP development where real-world problems can be solved, solutions must be found to ensure QP (i) scalability to millions of qubits, (ii) high fidelity (accuracy), (iii) reliability, (iv) low-cost, low-variability, high-yield volume manufacturing, and (v) ease and speed of testability.
To address the scalability, reliability, and manufacturing challenges, we propose to use the minimum-size transistor of production CMOS technology as the quantum processor qubit. This was not possible in the past due to large transistor dimensions but has become feasible in 22nm (Fully-Depleted Silicon on Insulator) FDSOI CMOS. The prospect of cheap quantum information processing in “plain old CMOS” is potentially revolutionary, since most other alternative proposals require fairly exotic technologies that lack scalability, high yield, reliability and low variability, and are difficult to interface with classical processors. It takes advantage of the the natural progression of Moore's law to nanoscale dimensions and the transition from classical to quantum MOSFET behaviour.
This presentation will discuss the fundamental concepts and the feasibility of high-temperature (2-12 K) quantum processors, based on heterostructure Si1-xGex/Si1-yGey hole-spin qubits, monolithically integrated with control and readout electronics in commercial 22nm FDSOI CMOS technology. These temperatures, while still low, are 100 times higher than those of current competing quantum processors. Operation temperature is important because the QP is placed in a cryostat whose thermal lift (capacity to remove heat) increases exponentially with temperature.  Monolithic integration improves quantum processor fidelity, allows for scalability and ease of testability, reduces power consumption and cost, and improves manufacturability, yield and reliability.
The beneficial aspects of the SiGe channel hole-spin qubit will be emphasized in comparison with its silicon-only electron-spin counterpart. It will also be shown that, at 2-12 K, MOSFETs and cascodes can be operated as quantum dots in the subthreshold region, while behaving as classical MOSFETs and cascodes in the saturation region, suitable for qubits and mm-wave mixed-signal processing circuits, respectively.
Irrespective of the qubit technology, the development of large quantum processors is limited by the power consumption and associated heat dissipation of the analog-mixed-signal control and readout electronics and by the challenge of interconnecting such a large number of qubits with the control electronics. By developing elevated-temperature qubits, the heat dissipation constraints on the co-integrated or co-located control electronics and on the cryostat thermal lift are relieved, thus allowing for the integration of more complex quantum processors.
However, elevated-temperature qubits require higher-frequency spin control electronics, in the upper millimetre-wave and even THz frequency range. The design of low-power millimetre-wave spin manipulation electronic circuits will also be covered.  Finally, I will present measurements for full technology characterization at cryogenic temperatures up to 67 GHz and describe a methodology for cryogenic mm-wave control electronics design based on room-temperature transistor models.

Bio: Sorin P. Voinigescu is a Professor  in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Toronto where he holds the Stanley Ho Chair in Microelectronics and is the Director of the VLSI Research Group. He is an IEEE Fellow and an expert on millimeter-wave and 100+Gb/s integrated circuits and atomic-scale semiconductor device technologies. He obtained his  PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Toronto in 1994 and his  M.Sc Degree in Electronics and Telecommunications from the Politechnical Institute of Bucharest in 1984.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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Towards softer and more tissue-resembling elastomers

Prof. Dr. Anne Ladegaard Skov,
Technical University of Denmark, DTU


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/927149523

Abstract: Soft robotics put a demand forward for softer and softer materials with mechanical integrity and stability over time. Hydrogels are natural candidates with respect to the softness and to some extent with respect to the mechanical integrity, but over time, hydrogels change properties due to the change of water content. Silicone elastomers are the excellent for soft robotics due to their inherent softness, mechanical integrity and stability both with respect to temperature (between -100 and 300◦C) and deformation (mechanical stability for more than 100 mio cycles is not uncommon). However, silicone elastomers are challenged with demands of elastic moduli below ~500 kPa. Various network structures have been made to decrease the elastic moduli beyond the natural lower limit arising from the elastic response from entanglements. Amongst these structures are slide-ring elastomers, bottlebrush elastomers, and a completely novel type of elastomer where the origin of elasticity is currently not understood. The pros and cons of these network synthesis methods and the resulting properties will be discussed in this talk.

Bio: Anne Ladegaard Skov is a professor of polymer science and engineering specialising in design and utilization of silicone elastomers in the Danish Polymer Centre at Department of Chemical Engineering, DTU. She holds a PhD in polymer physics from DTU. She was a research fellow at Cambridge University, UK, before taking up a position as assistant professor at DTU. She has headed the Danish Polymer Centre sinde 2016. In 2018 she was promoted to full professor. She has worked with functionalisation and formulation of silicone elastomers with main focus on silicone elastomers used and optimised for dielectric elastomers and more recently for flexible electronics and drug delivery amongst others.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Donhee Ham

Prof. Dr. Donhee Ham,
Harvard University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/934241343

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Alard Mosk

Prof. Dr. Alard Mosk,
Utrecht University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/119888136

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Alberto Salleo

Prof. Dr. Alberto Salleo,
Stanford University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/843927942

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenbrunner

Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenbrunner
Johannes Kepler University Linz


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream:

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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