Upcoming Seminars and Events

IGM Colloquium: Folding of a continuum and energy releasing or fluttering rods

Prof. Davide Bigoni, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering
University of Trento, Italy
 

It will be shown that Cosserat elastic solids with extreme anisotropy may exhibit folding and faulting, the former being the process in which bending localizes into sharp corners separated by almost undeformed elements, while the latter corresponds to the formation of displacement jumps of finite size [1,2]. While faulting can be often observed in geological formations, folding is rarely encountered in nature and is difficult to be described within the realm of the Cauchy theory of elasticity, but is shown to become possible in constrained Cosserat elastic materials.
The nonlinear theory of elastic rods is a framework for describing bifurcation and instabilities of a number of interesting structures, showing for instance configurational forces analogous to those acting on dislocations in solids. Several problems influenced by configurational forces or involving elastic energy releases will be resented, including snaking of an elastic rod [3, 4].
The dynamics of an elastic rod in a cantilever configuration and subject to a tangential follower load of the ‘Ziegler type’ at its end (the ‘Pfluger problem’) is finally addressed. This structure is subject to a Hopf bifurcation, corresponding to the initiation of the so-called ‘flutter instability’. A new experimental set-up has been designed, produced and tested to realize the follower load. Experiments provide the evidence of flutter and divergence instability and provide the first proof that damping sources have a destabilizing effect on the system (the so-called ‘Ziegler paradox’) [5].
References
[1] Bigoni, D., Gourgiotis, P.A. (2016) Folding and faulting of an elastic continuum. Proc. Royal Soc. A 472, 20160018.
[2] Gourgiotis, P.A., Bigoni, D. (2017) The dynamics of folding instability in a constrained Cosserat medium. Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. A, 375, 20160159.
[3] Dal Corso, F., Misseroni, D., Pugno, N.M., Movchan, A.B., Movchan, N.V., Bigoni, D. (2017) Serpentine locomotion through elastic energy release. J. Royal Soc. Interface 14, 20170055.
[4] Armanini, C., Dal Corso, F., Misseroni, D., Bigoni, D. (2017) From the elastica compass to the elastica catapult: an essay on the mechanics of soft robot arm. Proc. Royal Soc. A 473, 20160870.
[5] Bigoni, D., Kirillov, O., Misseroni, D., Noselli, G.Tommasini, M. (2018) Flutter and divergence instability in the Pflüger column: Experimental evidence of the Ziegler destabilization paradox. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 116, 99-116.

Bio:
Davide Bigoni is a mechanician working in solid and structural mechanics and material modeling, wave propagation, fracture mechanics. His approach to research is the employment of a broad vision of mechanics, with a combination of mathematical modelling, numerical simulation, and experimental validation. From 2001 Davide Bigoni holds a professor position at the University of Trento, where he is leading a group of excellent researchers in the field of Solid and Structural Mechanics.
He has authored or co-authored more than 100 journal papers and has published a book on nonlinear Solid Mechanics. He was elected in 2009 Euromech Fellow (of the European Mechanics Society), has received in 2012 the Ceramic Technology Transfer Day Award (of the ACIMAC and ISTEC-CNR), in 2014 he has received the Doctor Honoris Causa degree at the Ovidius University of Constanta and in 2016 the Panetti and Ferrari Award for Applied Mechanics (from Accademia delle Scienze di Torino). He has been awarded an ERC advanced grant in 2013. He is co-editor of the Journal of Mechanics of Materials and Structures and associate Editor of Mechanics Research Communications and in the editorial board of 8 international journals.


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Functional interplay between chromatin organizers and condensins for the control of chromosome conformation and segregation in bacteria

Frédéric Boccard, Institut de Biologie Intégrative de la Cellule, CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France

Condensation of DNA molecules results in the formation of chromosomes. In bacteria, the chromosome is a folded structure called nucleoid. The objectives of our laboratory are to reveal the principles of chromosome organization, characterize the molecular mechanisms involved, and analyze the coordination of chromosome segregation with progression of the cell cycle in different bacterial models. Using Chromosome-Conformation-Capture methods combined with genomics, fluorescence microscopy and genetic approaches, we have disclosed in E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa the three-dimensional folding of the chromosome and characterized the activity of several factors involved in chromatin organization and nucleoid conformation. At short scale, the contact map revealed the presence of domains ranging in size from 50kb to 300kb with long and highly expressed genes frequently found between domains. At large scale, long distance contacts accounted for the presence of macrodomains. By analyzing the contact frequency in several mutants, we revealed the modus operandi of chromatin organizers and condensins as well as their interplay in controlling short- and long-range DNA contacts.


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Reiko Hayama - Œuvrer entre Japon et France

Reiko Hayama, architecte honoraire et membe du conseil d'orientation de La Maison de la Culture du Japon à Paris

Née en 1933, Reiko Hayama a commencé sa carrière d’architecte au Japon dans les années 1950 chez Kunio Mayekawa, disciple de Le Corbusier, avant de poursuivre son œuvre en France. Tout d’abord collaboratrice de Charlotte Perriand et Jean Prouvé, elle a créé son agence et dirigé de grands chantiers d’usines en France et au Japon. Elle est la première architecte japonaise enregistrée en France et a reçu de prestigieuses distinctions dont celle de l’empereur pour son oeuvre.

Cours SHS ouvert à tous!


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Universal compression of images: send the model?

Aline ROUMY,  INRIA-Rennes (France)
Aline Roumy received the Engineering degree from Ecole Nationale Superieure de l'Electronique et de ses Applications (ENSEA), France in 1996, the Master degree in 1997 and the Ph.D. degree in 2000 from the University of Cergy-Pontoise, France. During 2000-2001, she was a research associate at Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. On November 2001, she joined INRIA, Rennes, France as a research scientist. She has held visiting positions at Eurecom and UC Berkeley. She serves as an Associate Editor for the Annals of telecommunications and for the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing. Her current research interests include the area of statistical signal and image processing, coding theory and information theory.
 

ABSTRACT:
Universal compression is the problem of compressing a data source without knowledge of the source probability distribution. 
This occurs in particular when images and videos have to be compressed. 
At the heart of the matter are the questions of modeling the data and coding the model. 
In the first part of the presentation, the impact of the model will be discussed and I will present new, learned models of images and evaluate their impact on image compression  performance. In particular, a transform and a predictor that both aim at capturing spatial correlation, will be learned (via a deep autoencoder and a set of deep neural networks).
In the second part of the presentation, I will introduce a novel source coding problem allowing massive random access to a large database of correlated sources. I will show that it is possible to extract arbitrary sources from an appropriately compressed database purely by bit extraction, and at the same rate as if the database was decoded and the requested sources were re-encoded.
Then the question of source modeling in view of compression will be discussed.
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EDMX Research Day 2018



PhD students presentations
Posters sessions 
Talks of EDMX Alumni
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WORKSHOP: Accelerate your startup ́s growth with public funding (hosted by Catalyze)

SPEAKERS: 

Virginia Ballotta, Country Manager Switzerland
Sabine Oppedijk, Consultant
Ming Wang, Consultant
 


DESCRIPTION:

Are you struggling with the financing of your start-up? Would you like to learn more about public funding?

Innovation Forum Lausanne invites you to “Accelerate your start-up with public funding”, a workshop organized in collaboration with Catalyze, a market leader in obtaining funding for biomedical and healthcare innovations. During this occasion you will be taught how to deal with public funding by joining practical activities and case study analysis. 
This event is developed within the context of our accelerator for early stage-startups, IMAGINEIF! and it is meant to enrich the economical background of the applicants and whoever is interested in entrepreneurship. At the end of the event, the Top10 finalists of IMAGINE IF! will be announced and a networking apero will follow.

Register Here.

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PROGRAM:

16:30 Welcome by Innovation Forum Lausanne
          Information and update about the IMAGINE IF! contest
16:45  Workshop on "Accelerating your startup's growth with public funding"
           Part 1: How to navigate the jungle of public funding (interactive presentation, including a FUNding quiz)
           Part 2: Workshop with case studies of relevant funding schemes
18:30  Announcement of IMAGINE IF! top 10 finalists
19:00 Light apéro & networking


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SPONSORS:

Catalyze
Kellerhals Carrard
SEED UP
Venturelab
BUHLER
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Towards a molecular-level understanding of bacterial type 3 secretion: Resolving cytosolic complex formation in living cells by tracking single-molecules

Prof. Andreas Gahlmann Center for Cell and Membrane Physiology University of Virginia  

About a third of bacterial proteins are either transported across or integrated into the cell membranes, so that they can perform functions that are vital for bacterial survival in specific environmental niches. Directional transport of selected proteins often relies on large membrane-embedded biomolecular assemblies. For example, the dual membrane-spanning Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) enables Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to inject so-called effector proteins directly into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells – a virulence mechanism that currently results in more than 1 million human deaths per year. While the cocktail of injected effector proteins differs for each pathogen, the structural proteins of T3SSs are highly conserved, making Type 3 secretion systems a key target for anti-virulence treatments. Our research focuses on providing a detailed understanding of how T3SSs are functionally regulated at the molecular level and how the T3SS and similar assemblies ultimately enable bacterial survival and virulence. 
In this talk, I will describe how single-molecule localization and tracking microscopy in different genetic backgrounds provides a path towards describing the molecular mechanism(s) of type 3 secretion in living cells. Through computational aberration correction and quantitative numerical analysis, we determine the subcellular locations and 3D motion trajectories of single fluorescently labeled proteins. Our results indicate that the structural T3SS proteins also exist in freely diffusing cytosolic complexes with different molecular compositions. Some, but not all, of these complexes only form in the presence of other T3SS proteins and their abundances change upon activation of secretion. Resolving the cytosolic diffusion states of T3SS proteins provides important insights into the dynamic regulatory network that controls type 3 secretion.


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Efficient and cost-effective water splitting electrocatalysts based on transition metal phosphides

Dr. Lifeng Liu
International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL),
Braga, Portugal

ChE-605 - Highlights in Energy Research seminar series
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen is an ecofriendly way to produce high-purity hydrogen fuels and has shown substantial promise as a means for renewable energy storage. To enable widespread deployment of water electrolyzers, it is of paramount importance to develop efficient, durable and inexpensive water splitting catalysts so that the electrolyzed hydrogen fuels can become economically competitive and viable. In this presentation, I will show our recent effort towards developing transition metal phosphide (TMP) based electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Specifically, I will showcase, primarily from catalytic materials point of view, the preparation of self-supported TMP electrodes [1-3] as well as microstructural and compositional engineering of TMP catalysts to achieve good electrocatalytic performance [4-6]. Besides, I will mention our recent work on the development of acid/alkaline hybrid water electrolysis taking advantage of self-supported TMP electrodes we developed [7].
References:
[1] X. Wang, Y. V. Kolen’ko, L.-F. Liu, Chem. Commun. 2015, 51, 6738.
[2] X. Wang, Y. V. Kolen’ko, X. Bao, K. Kovnir, L.-F. Liu, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 8188.
[3] X. Wang, W. Li, D. Xiong, D. Y. Petrovykh, L.-F. Liu, Adv. Funct. Mater. 2016, 26, 4067.
[4] J. Xu, Y. Liu, J. Li, I. Amorim, B. Zhang, D. Xiong, N. Zhang, S. M. Thalluri, J. P. S. Sousa, L.-F. Liu, J. Mater. Chem. A 2018, DOI: 10.1039/C8TA07958G
[5] J. Xu, J. Li, D. Xiong, B. Zhang, Y. Liu, K. H. Wu, I. Amorim, L.-F. Liu, Chem. Sci. 2018, 9, 3470.
[6] J. Xu, T. Liu, J. Li, B. Li, Y. Liu, B. Zhang, D. Xiong, I. Amorim, W. Li, L.-F. Liu, Energy Environ. Sci. 2018, 11, 1819.
[7] J. Xu, I. Amorim, J. Li, N. Zhang, D. Xiong, L.-F. Liu, in preparation.

The seminar can also be followed remotely by joining the online Cisco WebEx meeting (connection possible 15 minutes before the talk).
See here the documentation how to install the Cisco WebEx add-on on your computer.
In case of problem, you can contact our IT support (37679 - it.vs@epfl.ch )


 
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IGM MA THESIS in a lab : Pitch & Apero

Differents speakers (Prof. & PhD) from 5 IGM labs

  • Thinking about a career in research ? Learn about your options directly from over 5 IGM labs !
  • 3 minutes pitches for over 15 projects followed by an apero
  • 13.12.18 17:15 p.m. MED 2 1522
  • Please register with the Doodle poll here: https://epfl.doodle.com/poll/ehb7g9tnzvaty43r

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Microtubule shaft dynamics

Charlotte Aumeier - currently works at the Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva. Charlotte does research in Marine Biology, Cell Biology and Molecular Biology

Microtubules are dynamic polymers composed of tubulin subunits which are organized in a highly controlled dense network. Individual microtubules undergo dynamic instability: they stochastically switch between growing and shrinking at the microtubule tip. This seems to imply that the control of the network dynamics occurs at the filament tips, while the tube itself ("the shaft") appears like a passive element. Is the shaft really passive? Recent works, shows that tubulin subunits exchange along the shaft results in patches "freshly"-incorporated GTP-tubulin. Here I will show how these GTP- patches cause an effective prolongation of the microtubule lifetime, because they promote regrowth. A local regulation of microtubule lifetime e.g. by specific photo-manipulation of the microtubule shaft can indeed challenge the cell polarity. I will further show that kinesin motor proteins remove tubulin subunits from the shaft as they walk, thereby stabilizing those particular microtubules which are most used for trafficking.


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Innate DNA sensing through the cGAS-STING system - Blurring the boundary between PAMP and DAMP

Dr Andrea Ablasser

Abstract :
The life of any organism depends on the ability of cells to accurately recognize and eliminate harmful microbes. In order to detect the immense repertoire of pathogenic entities, the innate immune system of mammals has evolved a range of distinct sensing strategies. One major mechanism is based on the recognition of microbial DNA - an invariant and highly immunogenic pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Host cells, however, contain abundant sources of self-DNA. In the context of cellular damage or metabolic derangement, “out-of-the-context” self-DNA can elicit potentially damaging inflammatory responses, thus serving as a potent danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP).
In my laboratory at EPFL, we study primarily the so-called cGAS-STING system - an evolutionary highly conserved innate DNA sensing system. On DNA binding, cGAS is activated to produce a second messenger cyclic dinucleotide (cyclic GMP-AMP), which stimulates the adaptor protein STING to induce innate immune responses. While this process was originally discovered as a crucial component of immune defense against pathogens, recent work has elucidated a pathogenic role for innate DNA sensing in a variety of sterile inflammatory diseases. In this seminar I will give an overview of our contributions to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying innate DNA recognition and highlight how such knowledge may be leveraged to develop innovative new medicines.

Selected References:
Haag et al., Nature 2018 Jul;559(7713):269-273.
Gulen et al., Nature Communications 2017 Sep 5;8(1):427.
Glück et al., Nature Cell Biology 2017 Sep;19(9):1061-1070.
Wassermann et al., Cell Host & Microbe 2015 Jun 10;17(6):799-810.
Ablasser* et al., Nature 2013 Jun 20;498(7454):380-4.
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Materials discovery using deep learning

Prof. Gareth Conduit, University of Cambridge UK

We propose a novel deep learning tool for materials discovery. The approach merges together both experimental data and computer simulations to exploit all possible sources of information. The tool has been used to design several materials that have been experimentally verified and patented. We present just one case study where we discover and characterize the new nickel-base alloy for direct laser deposition most likely to simultaneously satisfy targets of processibility, cost, density, phase stability, creep resistance, oxidation, and resistance to thermal stresses. Experimental testing confirms that the physical properties of the proposed alloy exceed those of other commercially available Ni-base alloys for combustor liner applications.

Probabilistic design of a molybdenum-base alloy using a neural network
B.D. Conduit, N.G. Jones, H.J. Stone & G.J. Conduit
Scripta Materialia 146, 82 (2018)

Materials data validation and imputation with an artificial neural network
P.C. Verpoort, P. MacDonald & G.J. Conduit
Computational Materials Science 147, 176 (2018)

Design of a nickel-base superalloy using a neural network
B.D. Conduit, N.G. Jones, H.J. Stone & G.J. Conduit
Materials & Design 131, 358 (2017)

Bio: Gareth Conduit has a track record of applying artificial intelligence to solve real-world problems. The technique, originally developed for materials design, is now being commercialized by startup Intellegens in not only materials design, but also infrastructure, drug discovery, and healthcare. Previously, Gareth had research interests in strongly correlated phenomena, in particular proposing spin spiral state in the itinerant ferromagnet that was later observed in CeFePO. Gareth's group is based at the University of Cambridge. 


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Printed EEG and EMG electronic-tattoos for neurological applications

Prof Yael Hanein, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IS

Electroencephalography and surface electromyography are notoriously cumbersome technologies. A typical setup may involve bulky electrodes, dandling wires, and a large amplifier unit. The wide adaptation of these technologies in numerous applications has been accordingly fairly limited. Thanks to the availability of printed electronics technologies, it is now possible to dramatically simplify these techniques. Elegant electrode arrays with unprecedented performances can be readily produced, eliminating the need to handle multiple electrodes and wires. Specifically, in this presentation I will discuss how printed electronics can improve signal transmission at the electrode-skin interface, facilitate electrode-skin stability, and enhance user convenience during electrode placement while achieving prolonged use. Customizing electrode array designs and implementing blind source separation methods, can also improve recording resolution, reduce variability between individuals and minimizing signal cross-talk between nearby electrodes. Finally, I will outline several important applications in the field of neuroscience and how each can benefit from the convergence of electrophysiology and printed electronics.

Bio
Yael Hanein is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Tel Aviv University.  In the past she conducted research at the Weizmann Institute (MSc and PhD in Physics), Princeton University (visiting student at the lab of Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Dan Tsui), and at the University of Washington (Postdoc in Electrical Engineering and Physics).  Her research field is neuro-engineering and her main passions are developing wearable electronic technology and bionic vision.
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IGM Colloquium: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

Dr. Efi Efrati, http://www.weizmann.ac.il/complex/efrati/

Abstract:

Unlike Lego bricks that perfectly assemble next to one another, in molecular assemblies some misfit is almost always present. The molecular constituents thus must distort in order to form an aggregate, resulting in a frustrated assembly. The generation of geometric frustration from the intrinsic geometry of the constituents of a material is not only natural and ubiquitous but also leads to a striking variety of morphologies of ground states and exotic response properties.
In this talk, I will review the notion of cumulative geometric frustration and discuss two distinct examples of geometrically frustrated assemblies: liquid crystals in 2D, and twisted molecular crystals that form banded spherulites. For liquid crystal, we will present how to quantify the frustration and give specific examples that exhibit super-extensive elastic energy. Motivated by the twisted crystals observed for a wide variety of organic molecular crystals studied by the Kahr group in NYU, we study a model of frustrated assembly that in particular conveys the nano-metric pitch length of the constituents to the tens of microns pitch length observed for the twisted crystalline assemblies.

Bio:

I graduated in 2010 from the Hebrew university of Jerusalem where I did my Ph.D. under the guidance of Eran Sharon and Raz Kupferman studying frustrated elastic structures. I then moved to the James Franck Institute at the University of Chicago where I was a Simons Postdoctoral fellow. Since 2014 I have been an assistant professor in the department of Physics of complex systems at the Weizmann institute of Science.
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Computational imaging and modeling for cellular and nuclear biology



Microscopy has fueled biological discoveries for centuries, but technical progress during the last decades has greatly expanded the type and quantity of biological information that can be revealed by imaging. Advances in instrumentation, labeling and computation are driving an imaging data tsunami on par with that of DNA sequencing. We illustrate this trend and discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that massive imaging data raise for our understanding of biological systems.

References:
ZOLA-3D allows flexible 3D localization microscopy over an adjustable axial range. Andrey AristovBenoit LelandaisElena Rensen & Christophe Zimmer Nature Communications Volume 9, Article number: 2409 (2018)

Deep learning massively accelerates super-resolution localization microscopy. Wei OuyangAndrey AristovMickaël LelekXian Hao & Christophe Zimmer Nature Biotechnology Volume 36, pages 460–468 (2018)


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Visual Management Tool for Multi-criteria Decision Methods

Prof. Alessio Ishizaka

This seminar will be live-streamed at the following link: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/227165800


In today’s increasingly globalised and complex economy that is flooded with data, taking decisions is a much more complex task. To help managers to tackle this challenge, we have developed a new multi-criteria performance management method that provides input for visual management and continuous improvement initiatives.
In the first part of the talk by Prof Alessio Ishizaka, visual management tools on energy planning are applied. Although Multi-Criteria Decision Making methods have been extensively used in energy planning, their descriptive use has been rarely considered. In this paper, we add an evolutionary description phase as an extension to the AHP (analytic hierarchy process) method that helps policy makers to gain insights into their decision problems. The proposed extension has been implemented in an open-source software that allows the users to visualize the difference of opinions within a decision process, and also the evolution of preferences over time.
In second part of the talk, the innovation performances of small and medium enterprises from the French Lorraine region are assessed by integrating visual management tool with PROMETHEE.

Alessio Ishizaka is Full Professor in Decision Analysis, research lead and Deputy Director of the Centre of Operations Research and Logistics (CORL) at the Portsmouth Business School of the University of Portsmouth. He received his PhD from the University of Basel (Switzerland). He worked successively for the University of Exeter (UK), University of York (UK) and Audencia Grande Ecole de Management Nantes (France). He has been visiting professor several universities. His research is in the area of decision analysis, where he has published more than 70 papers. He is regularly involved in large European funded projects. He has been the chair, co-organiser and guest speaker of several conferences on this topic. Alongside his academic activities, he acts as a consultant for companies in helping them to take better decisions. He has written the key textbook Multicriteria Decision Analysis: methods and software.

 
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Functional Ultrasound (fUS) Imaging: a new neuroimaging modality for neuroscience

Prof Mickael Tanter, Institut Langevin, ESPCI, Paris, France.

In the last twenty years, the progressive introduction of plane or diverging ultrasonic wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams broke the resolution limits of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging (fUS imaging) of brain activity  introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such "human body seismology" provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, ...). For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound or fUS (functional ultrasound) imaging of brain activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution compared to fMRI. It provides the first modality for imaging of the whole brain activity working on awake and freely moving animals with unprecedented resolutions and was also translated recently to clinics.

Finally, we recently demonstrated that it can be combined with 3 µm diameter microbubbles injections in order to provide a first in vivo and non-invasive imaging modality at microscopic scales deep into organs combined with contrast agents by localizing the position of millions of microbubbles at ultrafast frame rates. This ultrasound localization microscopy technique solves for the first time the problem of in vivo imaging at microscopic scale the whole brain vasculature. Beyond fundamental neuroscience or stroke diagnosis, it will certainly provide new insights in the understanding of tumor angiogenesis, for example combined with PET/CT imaging.

Bio
Mickael Tanter is a research professor of the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm) and distinguished professor of ESPCI Paris. He is heading the laboratory “Physics for Medicine” and deputy director of Langevin Institute (CNRS) at ESPCI, Paris, France. He is also the director of the first INSERM Technology Research Accelerator created in 2016 and dedicated to Biomedical Ultrasound. Mickael Tanter is a world-renowned expert in biomedical ultrasound and wave physics. He authored more than 300 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters and is the recipient of 45 international patents. In the last 20 years, he co-invented several major innovations in Biomedical Ultrasound: Transient Elastography, Ultrafast Ultrasound and Shear Wave Elastography, functional Ultrasound (fUS) imaging of brain activity and Superresolution Ultrasound based on Ultrasound Localization Microscopy. He received many national and international distinctions (among them the Honored Lecture of the Radiology Society of North America in 2012, the Grand Prize of Medicine and Medical Research of Paris city in 2011, the Grand Prize of Fondation de la Recherche Médicale in 2016 and the Carl Hellmuth Hertz Prize of IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control society in 2017, and recently the highest distinction of the European Society in Molecular Imaging ESMI). M. Tanter is also the co-founder of several MedTech companies in Biomedical Ultrasound (Supersonic Imagine, CardiaWave, Iconeus).


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Applied Machine Learning Days 2019

See our workshop sessions, the 16 featured tracks and the list of speakers.

The Applied Machine Learning Days will take place from January 26th to 29th, 2019, at the Swiss Tech Convention Center on EPFL campus. It is now the largest and best-known Machine Learning event in Switzerland, and increasingly recognized as a major event in Europe. The event has a focus specifically on the applications of machine learning and AI, making it particularly interesting to industry and academia.

Saturday & Sunday will be ‘hands-on’ with more than 25 workshops, tutorials, trainings, coding classes and hackathons. The main conference will take place on Monday and Tuesday, with a program featuring amazing speakers, 16 domain-specific tracks (parallel session), poster sessions, a job fair and a special night with Garry Kasparov.

Speakers:
- Garry Kasparov (Chess Grandmaster) 
- Zeynep Tufekci (The New York Times) 
- Jeff Dean (Google) 
- Katja Hofmann (Microsoft Research) 
- Antoine Bordes (Facebook AI Research) 
- Alex "Sandy" Pentland (MIT Media Lab) 
- Yuan (Alan) Qi (Ant Financial) 
- Yuanchun Shi (Tsinghua University) 
- Li Pu (Segway Robotics) 
- Christopher Bishop (Microsoft Research) 
- Evgeniy Gabrilovich (Google) 
- crowdAI winners

Workshops:
Hands-on deep learning with TensorFlow.js / Policy-Making and Data Economy at the city level: utopia or reality? / Applied Language Technologies / Engineering for good - detecting pneumonia in X-Ray images / Advances in ML: Theory meets practice / AI and Healthcare / Industrial open data / Building Private-by-Design Voice Assistants with Snips / Trust In AI - methods and use cases for debiasing and explaining of algorithms / Using PySpark and interactive Jupyter notebook on Amazon Clusters / Tutorial: Build your first predictive model to forecast and detect anomalies / ML in your organization: a practical toolbox to identify and seize highest value opportunities in Machine Learning / PySpark: Big Data Processing and Machine Learning with Python / Enabling Resilience with Remote Sensing / Artificial Curiosity: Intrinsic Motivation in Machines too! / Reatching into the Rabbit Hole: Should we replace teachers with AI? / Machine Learning for fake news detection: theory and practice / TensorFlow Basics - Saturday / TensorFlow Basics - Sunday / Learning and Processing over Networks / Crashcourse in R for machine learning / Machine Learning Competition: Tennis Prediction / Applied Machine Learning for Anomaly Detection on Equipment / Credit Suisse Document Digitization Hackathon / TDA crash course: theory and practice for ML applications / Data exploration and preparation for Machine Learning / Machine Learning in Finance / Blue Brain Nexus, a knowledge graph for data driven projects

Tracks:
• AI & Cities
• AI & Computer Systems
• AI & Environment
• AI & Finance
• AI & Health
• AI & Industry
• AI & Intellectual Property
• AI & Language
• AI & Learning Analytics
• AI & Media
• AI & the Molecular World
• AI & Networks
• AI & Nutrition
• AI & Society
• AI & Transportation
• AI & Trust

Registration is mandatory and includes breakfast, coffee breaks, lunch and refreshments.


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Novel Mouse Models to Study Mitochondrial Proteostasis in the Nervous System

Hans-Georg Sprenger Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Dept. Mitochondrial Proteostasis, Cologne (D)

SEMINAR of the LAUSANNE INTEGRATIVE METABOLISM and NUTRITION ALLIANCE (LIMNA)

Abstract:
Disturbances in the morphology and function of mitochondria cause neurological diseases, which can affect the central and peripheral nervous system. The i-AAA protease YME1L ensures mitochondrial proteostasis and regulates mitochondrial dynamics by processing of the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1. Mutations in YME1L cause a multi-systemic mitochondriopathy associated with neurological dysfunction and mitochondrial fragmentation but pathogenic mechanisms remained enigmatic. Here, we report on striking cell-type specific defects in mice lacking YME1L in the nervous system. YME1L-deficient mice manifest ocular dysfunction with microphthalmia and cataracts and at later stages of life develop deficiencies in locomotor activity due to specific degeneration of spinal cord axons. We demonstrate that YME1L ensures efficient mitochondrial transport in neurons and maintains mitochondrial proteostasis and dynamics in vivo. Additional deletion of Oma1 restores tubular mitochondria but deteriorates axonal degeneration in the absence of YME1L, demonstrating that impaired mitochondrial proteostasis rather than mitochondrial fragmentation cause trafficking defects and the observed neurological dysfunction.
 
 
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Prof. Reza Ghodssi - IMT Distinguished Lecture

Prof. Dr. Reza Ghodssi
University of Maryland

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Abstract & Bio to follow.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.

 


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to be announced

Prof. Adrian Keller, Paderborn University (D)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Is Mars Habitable ?

Prof. Javier Martín-Torres

Assessing the habitability of Mars has been an objective of the scientific community for a long time, but it has recently become a sustained focus in light of data being returned from the planet and growing knowledge about life in extreme environments. The Curiosity rover on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), one of NASAs flagship missions, analyses since August 2012 the Martian environment to assess whether Mars could have supported life. After more than 5 years of operations on Mars the rover Curiosity has acquired an unprecedented data record of near surface measurements providing an invaluable ground truth about the environmental conditions on Mars. In particular Curiosity has found: (i) evidences for liquid water conditions on Mars; (ii) preserved indigenous organic molecules in mudstone soil samples; (iii) indigenous fixed nitrogen which may provide a biochemically accessible source of nitrogen for life; (iv) manganese oxides on the surface; and (iv) also detected methane in the atmosphere at variable concentrations throughout the mission. These discoveries, together with other from previous and current missions to Mars, have sparked speculation about the past or present existence of life on Mars; and they have opened many scientific questions and challenges. Moreover, the future human exploration of Mars requires access to in-situ resources. Space agencies are requesting, for the first time ever, for ideas on In-situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) instruments that can efficiently extract key resources (water, oxygen, etc.) from Mars. But the international efforts of Mars surface exploration require a coordinated effort to respect the Planetary Protection protocols and to avoid the forward contamination of Mars. This in turn requires, updating our knowledge about the Martian habitability conditions.

Javier Martín-Torres is Chaired Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the Luleå University of Technology in Sweden. He is also Visiting Professor at the School of Physics and Astronomy, at the University of Edinburgh, in the United Kingdom, at the Spanish Research Council, and Specially Appointed Professor at the University of Okayama in Japan.
Javier is the principal investigator of the HABIT instrument that will fly to Mars aboard the ExoMars mission of the European Space Agency. He has been the scientific responsible for the REMS instrument in NASA's Curiosity, which since 2012 investigates the habitability of Mars, and co-investigator of 7 space missions of NASA and ESA. He has worked for ESA, CalTech and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and ten years for NASA, from which he has received seven awards, one for "Outstanding contributions to the Investigations to the Columbia Challenger accident" and another "for the success of the operations and scientific exploitation of REMS/Curiosity ". Recently his team has won several European space innovation awards, including the OHB Innospace Challenge, and in November a team consisting of two of his students will fly in the Fly Your Thesis! Campaign of the European Space Agency, after being one of the 2 European teams selected in a European competitive process. In addition, for three years he was director of the Planetary Atmosphere Group of the Center of Astrobiology in Madrid, Spain.

 


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to be announced

Prof. Jussi Taipale, Cambridge University (UK)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
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to be announced

Prof. Björn Hogberg, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (SE)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
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to be announced

Prof. Francesco Stellacci, EPFL, Lausanne (CH)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
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to be announced

Prof. Martin Fussenegger, ETH Zürich, Basel (CH)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
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Lecture Demonstrations in the age of YouTube

Ilya Eigenbrot

Demonstrations have been used to make lectures more interesting and accessible for a very long time – but is there any point in investing time and effort into demonstrations in the age of smartphones and instant YouTube clips? This workshop will discuss this question, as well as give practical tips on designing and using demonstrations in different settings. You will also get the chance to design one or more demos relevant to your own area of teaching expertise. Facilitated by Ilya Eigenbrot with 20 year experience in the popularisation of science.


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to be announced

Prof. Ivan Martin, University of Basel (CH)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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HASEL Artificial Muscles - Versatile High-Performance Actuators for a New Generation of Life-like Robots

Prof. Dr. Christoph Keplinger
University of Colorado Boulder

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Abstract: Robots today rely on rigid components and electric motors based on metal and magnets, making them heavy, unsafe near humans, expensive and ill-suited for unpredictable environments. Nature, in contrast, makes extensive use of soft materials and has produced organisms that drastically outperform robots in terms of agility, dexterity, and adaptability. The Keplinger Lab aims to fundamentally challenge current limitations of robotic hardware, using an interdisciplinary approach that synergizes concepts from soft matter physics and chemistry with advanced engineering technologies to introduce intelligent materials systems for a new generation of life-like robots. One major theme of research is the development of new classes of actuators – a key component of all robotic systems – that replicate the sweeping success of biological muscle, a masterpiece of evolution featuring astonishing all-around actuation performance, the ability to self-heal after damage, and seamless integration with sensing.

This talk is focused on the labs' recently introduced HASEL artificial muscle technology. Hydraulically Amplified Self-healing ELectrostatic (HASEL) transducers are a new class of self-sensing, high-performance muscle-mimetic actuators, which are electrically driven and harness a mechanism that couples electrostatic and hydraulic forces to achieve a wide variety of actuation modes. Current designs of HASEL are capable of exceeding actuation stress of 0.3 MPa, linear strain of 100%, specific power of 600W/kg, full-cycle electromechanical efficiency of 30% and bandwidth of over 100Hz; all these metrics match or exceed the capabilities of biological muscle. Additionally, HASEL actuators can repeatedly and autonomously self-heal after electric breakdown, thereby enabling robust performance. Further, this talk introduces a facile fabrication technique that uses an inexpensive CNC heat sealing device to rapidly prototype HASELs. New designs of HASEL incorporate mechanisms to greatly reduce operating voltages, enabling the use of lightweight and portable electronics packages to drive untethered soft robotic devices powered by HASELs. Modeling results predict the impact of material parameters and scaling laws of these actuators, laying out a roadmap towards future HASEL actuators with drastically improved performance. These results highlight opportunities to further develop HASEL artificial muscles for wide use in next-generation robots that replicate the vast capabilities of biological systems.

Bio: Christoph Keplinger is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and a Fellow of the Materials Science and Engineering Program at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he also holds an endowed appointment serving as Mollenkopf Faculty Fellow. Building upon his background in soft matter physics (PhD, JKU Linz), mechanics and chemistry (Postdoc, Harvard University), he leads a highly interdisciplinary research group at Boulder, with a current focus on (I) soft, muscle-mimetic actuators and sensors, (II) energy harvesting and (III) functional polymers. His work has been published in top journals including Science, Science Robotics, PNAS, Advanced Materials and Nature Chemistry, as well as highlighted in popular outlets such as National Geographic. He has received prestigious US awards such as a 2017 Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, and international awards such as the 2013 EAPromising European Researcher Award from the European Scientific Network for Artificial Muscles. He is the principal inventor of HASEL artificial muscles, a new technology that will help enable a next generation of life-like robotic hardware; in 2018 he co-founded Artimus Robotics to commercialize the HASEL technology.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Prof. Chad Mirkin, Northwestern University, Evanston. IL (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Chad A. Mirkin, Ph.D., is the Director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and the George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry. Mirkin also is a professor of chemical and biological engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science & engineering, and medicine at Northwestern University.
Mirkin is a chemist and world-renowned nanoscience expert who is known for his discovery and development of spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), and the many medical diagnostic, therapeutic, and materials applications that have derived from them: Dip-Pen Naolithography (recognized by National Geographic as one of the "top 100 scientific discoveries that changed the world"); and numerous other contributions to supramolecular chemistry.
He is one of very few scientists elected into all three branches of the US National Academies (Medicine, Science, and Engineering). He served for eight years a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology under President Barack Obama. He has been recognized for his accomplishments with several national and international awards, including: the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in Convergence Research, the Dan David Prize, the Wilhelm Exner Medal, the RUSNANOPRIZE, the Dickson Prize in Science, the American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal, and the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize.
Mirkin holds a B.S. degree from Dickinson College (1986, elected into Phi Beta Kappa) and a Ph.D.in chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University (1989). He was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT prior to becoming a professor at Northwestern University in 1991.
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Assessment Matters

Roland Tormey

To develop assessment techniques which are valid and objective, notably to test if students have met the required learning outcomes.


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Prof. Wilson Wong, Boston University, Boston, MA (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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to be announced

Prof. David Sabatini, Massachusettes Institute of Technology; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
Bio:
David M. Sabatini is an American scientist and Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. He has been an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2008 and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016. He is known for his important contributions in the areas of cell signaling and cancer metabolism, most notably the discovery and study of mTOR, a protein kinase that is an important regulator of cell and organismal growth that is deregulated in cancer, diabetes, as well as the aging process.

Education:
MD/PhD 1997, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Research Summary:
We probe the basic mechanisms that regulate growth — the process whereby cells and organisms accumulate mass and increase in size. The pathways that control growth are often hindered in human diseases like diabetes and cancer. Our long-term goals are to identify and characterize these mechanisms, and to understand their roles in normal and diseased mammals.
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to be announced

Prof. Cheng Zhu, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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to be announced

Prof. Gilad Haran, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (IL)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Leveraging Labs for Learning

Siara Isaac & Cécile Hardebolle

Explore ways to design lab experiments that help students develop a scientific approach which is transferable to real world complexity.


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Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics

Keynote and Invited Speakers on www.diamondphotonics.org

The Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics at EPFL will be a unique event bringing together for the first time the worldwide leaders in diamond photonics. It will gather on EPFL campus the key international players of academic research in physics and photonics, in growth and fabrication technologies, together with companies engaged in bringing the applications of diamond photonics to the market. As a meeting point for physicists, engineers, materials scientists, and entrepreneurs, the symposium will decisively contribute to the emergence of novel quantum technologies in photonics, such as quantum-enhanced sensors and secure communication devices, and of novel industrial photonic components such as cavities for high power lasers.
 


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to be announced

Prof. Claire Hivroz, Institute Curie, Paris (F)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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to be announced

Prof. Fabian Theis, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich (D)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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2019 World Conference of Science Journalists



The 11th World Conference of Science Journalists will be held from July 1st to July 5th, 2019, in Lausanne.


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CMOS Microelectronics for DNA detection using Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors

Prof. Dr. Pantelis Georgiou
Imperial College London

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Abstract: In the last decade, we have seen a convergence of microelectronics into the world of healthcare providing novel solutions for early detection, diagnosis and therapy of disease. This has been made possible due to the emergence of CMOS technology, allowing fabrication of advanced systems with complete integration of sensors, instrumentation and processing, enabling design of miniaturised medical devices which operate with low-power. This has been specifically beneficial for the application areas of DNA based diagnostics and full genome sequencing, where the implementation of chemical sensors known as Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) directly in CMOS has enabled the design of large-scale arrays of millions of sensors that can conduct in-parallel detection of DNA. Furthermore, the scaling of CMOS with Moore’s law and the integration capability with microfluidics has enabled commercial efforts to make full genome sequencing affordable and therefore deployable in hospitals and research labs.
 
In this talk, I present how my lab is advancing the areas of DNA detection and rapid diagnostics through the design of CMOS based Lab-on-Chip systems using ISFETs. I will first introduce the fundamentals and physical properties of DNA as a target molecule and how it can be detected using different modalities through the use of CMOS technology. I will then present methods of design of ISFET sensors and instrumentation in CMOS, in addition to the challenges and limitations that exist for fabrication, providing solutions to allow design of large-scale ISFET arrays for real-time DNA amplification and detection systems. I will conclude with the presentation of state-of-the-art CMOS systems that are currently being used for genomics and point-of-care diagnostics, and the results of our latest fabricated multi-sensor CMOS platform for rapid screening of infectious disease and management of antimicrobial resistance.

Bio: Pantelis Georgiou currently holds the position of Reader (Associate Professor) at Imperial College London within the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is the head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory in the Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology; a multi-disciplinary group that invents, develops and demonstrates advanced micro-devices to meet global challenges in biomedical science and healthcare. His research includes ultra-low power micro-electronics, bio-inspired circuits and systems, lab-on-chip technology and application of micro-electronic technology to create novel medical devices. Application areas of his research include new technologies for treatment of diabetes such as the artificial pancreas, novel Lab-on-Chip technology for genomics and diagnostics targeted towards infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and wearable technologies for rehabilitation of chronic conditions.
 
Dr. Georgiou graduated with a 1st Class Honours MEng Degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2004 and Ph.D. degree in 2008 both from Imperial College London. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering as Research Associate until 2010, when he was appointed Head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory. In 2011, he joined the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, where he currently holds an academic faculty position. He conducted pioneering work on the silicon beta cell and is now leading the project forward to the development of the first bio-inspired artificial pancreas for treatment of Type I diabetes. In addition to this, he made significant contributions to the development of integrated chemical-sensing systems in CMOS. He has pioneered the development of the Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistor, an integrated pH sensor which is currently being used in next generation DNA sequencing machines, demonstrating for the first time its use in low-power weak-inversion, and its capability in a multimodal sensing array for Lab-on-Chip applications. Dr. Georgiou is a senior member of the IEEE and IET and serves on the BioCAS and Sensory Systems technical committees of the IEEE CAS Society. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors and TBioCAS journals. He is also the CAS representative on the IEEE sensors council. In 2013 he was awarded the IET Mike Sergeant Achievement Medal for his outstanding contributions to engineering and development of the bio-inspired artificial pancreas. In 2017, he was also awarded the IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement award. He is an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in Circuits and Systems.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Prof. Debbie Senesky - IMT Distinguished Lecture

Prof. Dr. Debbie Senesky
Stanford University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Abstract and Bio to follow.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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to be announced

Prof. Richard E. Lenski, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Education:
1973-76    B.A., Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (USA)
1977-82    Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Positions:
1982-85    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA)
1984        Visiting Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (USA)
1985-88    Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1988-91    Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1991-        Hannah Professor of Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)
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