Upcoming Seminars and Events

Non-invasive brain stimulation and neurofeedback: from basic research to decoding motor intentions

Prof. Nici Wenderoth, ETH Zurich, CH.

Operant conditioning based on neurofeedback is increasingly used in both basic research and neurorehabilitation. Electroencephalography (EEG) is likely the most popular non-invasive modality for neurofeedback in humans, but applications are challenged by a low signal-to-noise ratio and poor anatomical and functional specificity. Here I will present an alternative approach where we apply transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a non-invasive neurofeedback context. I will show (i) that healthy participants can learn to volitionally up- or down-regulate the state of their motor system and elucidate which neurophysiological mechanisms mediate this effect; (ii) how this approach can be extended to decoding intended finger and hand movements; and (iii) that TMS neurofeedback training is feasible in stroke patients. 

Bio. Professor Nici Wenderoth is full professor for Neural Control of Movement in the Department for Health Sciences and Technology at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Her main research focus is on human systems neuroscience. Additionally, she actively pursues translational research in animal models and clinical applications. She is currently Director of the Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Director of the interdisciplinary Future Health Technologies research programme at the Singapore-ETH Campus and President of the Betty and David Koetser Foundation for Brain Research.
 


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Memory aids on the chromatin ? Deciphering epigenetic mechanisms of memory storage and change

Dr Johannes Graeff, SV / BMI / UPGRAEFF

Abstract :
My laboratory is interested in the cellular and molecular underpinnings of memory. To investigate these, we focus on neuroepigenetic processes and hypothesize that with their Janus-faced property of being at once dynamic and stable, epigenetic mechanisms harbor the potential to better explain memory formation, storage and loss. Of special interest in the lab are memory deterioration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and particularly robust memories such as those occurring in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). For the former, we have thus far revealed the first methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) in AD, and thereby identified a novel candidate gene – PM20D1 – that bestows neuroprotection. For the latter, we have delineated key brain areas and cellular subpopulations implicated in the attenuation of long-lasting traumatic memories, and thereby provided the first engram-specific evidence for memory updating that may underlie the treatment of PTSD. These achievements now enable the next level of investigation of PM20D1-related and engram-specific epigenetics essential for memory storage and change.

Short Bio :
Johannes Gräff is Assistant Professor on Tenure Track at the Brain Mind Institute of the School of Life Sciences at EPFL, Switzerland. Originally from St. Gallen, Switzerland, he obtained his M.Sc. from the University of Lausanne, his PhD under the guidance of Isabelle Mansuy at ETHZ, and conducted his postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Li-Huei Tsai at the Picower Institute of Learning and Memory at MIT. In 2014, he has received the Young Investigator Award of the Swiss Society for Biological Psychiatry, and in 2020 the Boehringer Ingelheim FENS Research Award.
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A White-Box Machine Learning Approach for Revealing Pathway Mechanisms

Prof. Jason H. Yang, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (USA)

BIOENGINEERING SEMINAR
 
Abstract:
Recent advances in high-throughput experimental technologies and data analyses now enable unprecedented observation, quantification and association of biological signals with cellular phenotypes. However, current approaches for interpreting large biomedical datasets are unable to provide casual, mechanistic biological understanding. Here, we will describe a “white-box” machine learning approach integrating prospective cellular network modeling with machine learning to identify experimentally testable pathway mechanisms from biochemical screening data.

We will demonstrate how this approach enabled the novel discovery that purine biosynthesis is involved in bactericidal antibiotic lethality, through its coupling to central carbon metabolism. We will discuss how such approaches may be extended towards advancing systems medicine by revealing mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and therapeutic efficacy. We propose such approaches may be generalized to investigate any quantifiable cellular phenotype using relevant biological networks.

Bio:
Dr. Jason Yang is a new Assistant Professor and Chancellor’s Scholar in the Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics and in the Center for Emerging and Re-Emerging Pathogens at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. He received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Virginia, where he trained with Dr. Jeffrey Saucerman, studying β-adrenergic signaling in cardiac myocytes. He completed his postdoctoral training with Dr. James Collins at MIT and the Broad Institute, studying metabolic mechanisms of antibiotic-induced bacterial death physiology. Jason leads a systems biology research group, where they are developing approaches that integrate high-throughput experimentation with network modeling and machine learning to accelerate the discovery of causal biological mechanisms as they pertain to the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic and infectious diseases.
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New Frontiers in Nanophotonics

Professor Benjamin Eggleton is the Director of The University of Sydney Nano Institute. He also currently serves as co-Director of the NSW Smart Sensing Network (NSSN).  He was previously an ARC Laureate Fellow and an ARC Federation Fellow twice and was founding Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) from 2003-2017. Eggleton is the author or coauthor of more than 490 journal publications, including Science, Nature Photonics, Nature Physics, Nature Communications, Physical Review Letters and Optica and over 200 invited presentations. His journal papers have been cited 22,000 times according to webofscience with an h-number of 71 (93 in google scholar). Eggleton is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (AAS), the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering (ATSE), the Optical Society of America, IEEE Photonics and SPIE. He is Editor-in-Chief of APL Photonics.

Nanophotonics deals with the manipulating of lightwaves at the nanoscale using nanostructures, such as nanowires, photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials. My talk will review recent breakthroughs in achieving on-chip control of lightwaves using nanophotonic circuits etched into hybrid planar geometries, particularly silicon based. I will emphasize new ultracompact signal processing functions realized using nonlinear optical effects, including Brillouin scattering, which harness the interaction between light and sound waves for applications in telecommunications, sensing and microwave technologies.
 
[1] BJ Eggleton, CG Poulton, PT Rakich, MJ Steel, G Bahl, Brillouin integrated photonics, Nature Photonics, 1-14
 


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Glimpses of Gut Microbes in their Physical World

Raghuveer Parthasarathy received his undergraduate degree in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Chicago, where his dissertation work examined self-assembled nanocrystal arrays. He then returned to Berkeley as a Miller Research Fellow and postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemistry, exploring lipid and protein membranes. In 2006 he joined the faculty at the University of Oregon, where he is presently a Professor of Physics. His research focuses on biophysics, especially the structure and dynamics of multicellular communities, which his lab explores using techniques such as three-dimensional microscopy. His teaching primarily involves courses for non-science majors, such as a “biophysics for non-scientists” class.


In any ecosystem, the physical structure of the landscape and the activities of its resident organisms influence one another. This holds in the vertebrate gut as well, where legions of microbes cooperate, compete, and influence the health of their hosts. In intestinal ecosystems, however, we know little about the spatial structure, bacterial behaviors, and physical forces present, severely limiting our ability to understand and eventually engineer the gut flora. To address this, my lab applies light sheet fluorescence microscopy, an optical technique that enables high-speed, high-resolution three-dimensional imaging, to larval zebrafish, a model organism that enables a high degree of experimental control. I will describe this approach and experiments that have revealed how bacteria can manipulate intestinal mechanics to facilitate invasion, how antibiotics can cause collapses in gut populations in a manner reminiscent of gelation transitions in soft matter physics, and more. In all these cases, the physical structure of microbial groups emerges as a major determinant of their dynamics.

 
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Sustainability Lecture for Supply Chain Leaders

Professor Guido Palazzo, Professor of business ethics, Vice Dean HEC University of Lausanne and Academic Director of execed HEC Lausanne 

The International Institute for the Management of Logistics and Supply Chain (IML) is delighted to welcome esteemed lecturer and inspirational public speaker, Guido Palazzo for the introductory lecture of our Master Class, our future sustainable supply chain leaders of 2020. To mark the occasion, we are opening the morning lecture to the Class of 2019, IML Alumni & Guests. 

Program
09.15 -12.45 : Lecture open to all, registration required by sending email to info.iml@epfl.ch
12.45 -13.45  : Light lunch for IML Alumni members

In his research, Guido Palazzo is passionate about the dark side of the force and examines unethical decision making from various angles. He is mainly known for his studies in globalization, in particular on human rights violations in global value chains, but he also studies the reasons for unethical behavior in organization and the impact of organized crime on business and society.
He studied business administration and has a PhD in philosophy from the University of Marburg in Germany.

Registration required! Alumni may register here and guests may register by sending an email confirmation to info.iml@epfl.ch.

We look forward to welcoming you at IML-EPFL
 


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The Applied Machine Learning Days

  See our workshop sessions, the 29 featured tracks and the list of speakers.

The Applied Machine Learning Days is one of the largest machine learning and artificial intelligence events in Europe. It focusses specifically on the application of machine learning and AI, making it particularly interesting both for industry and academia, thus creating a unique audience. For the fourth year in a row, we look forward to welcoming leaders in the fields of academia, business, and technology from the 25th to the 29th of January 2020 at the SwissTech Convention Centre in Lausanne, Switzerland.

The first two days of the event are focussed on hands-on sessions with over 30 workshops, training, coding classes, and tutorials. The main conference is taking place over the following three days and will uncover over 29 different topics. The first two days are focussed on more technical aspects of machine learning and AI hosting leading speakers in their field, poster sessions and, an exhibition. The third and final day is a novelty for this fourth edition of AMLD, this day will address how AI affects labour markets, hiring practices and jobs, and the political and social consequences of this reuniting experts in the field of business and technology. It will also host our very first Startup Day whereby our team will have selected very promising startups in AI and machine learning to exhibit at the conference and also to pitch. 

This years notable speakers include:
Max Tegmark Professor at MIT, David Autor Ford Professor of Economics at MIT, Danny Lange VP of AI and Machine Learning Unity Technologies, Christine McLeavey Payne MuseNet researcher OpenAI, Jakob Uszkoreit Head Google Brain Berlin.

The event wouldn't be complete without multiple networking opportunities, all lunches included in the ticket price and an evening cocktail to wrap up the conference. Registration is mandatory.
 


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The host cell signalome as a target for chemotherapy of infectious diseases

Christian DOERIG, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Australia

Host-directed therapy (HDT) is gaining traction as a strategy to combat infectious diseases. It provides (i) untapped targets to limit cross-resistance to existing antimicrobials, and (ii) reduced susceptibility to the emergence of de novo resistance. Protein kinases have proven druggability in the context of cancer chemotherapy, and we propose that host cell kinases required for the replication of pathogens are attractive targets for HDT.
We have recently implemented an antibody microarray-based approach to systematically assess the host cell signalling response to intracellular pathogens; most of the antibodies on the array are phospho-specific, allowing to monitor the activation of signalling pathways by infections. We first provided proof of principle, using a Hepatitis C virus/ hepatocyte model, that this can lead to the identification of druggable host targets (protein kinases) and lead molecules to prevent infection (1). We also used this technology to identify the Insulin receptor as a mediator of the block of viral superinfection in mosquitoes infected by Wolbachia (2), and to show that a small molecule inhibitor of the insulin receptor impairs Zika virus replication in live mosquitoes. 
We have now completed a system-wide study of host erythrocyte response to infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and identified several human kinases that are activated by infection; furthermore, inhibitors against some of these kinases display high potency against parasite proliferation in vitro (3). We were unable to raise resistant parasite lines against some of these inhibitors, validating that notion that targeting the host limits the ability of the parasite to develop resistance. However, resistance against Trametinib, an inhibitor of the host cell kinase MEK, appeared rapidly, suggesting there is a parasite-encoded off-target for this compound.  Unexpectedly, some of the Trametinib-resistant lines have become addicted to the inhibitor, suggesting that the inhibitor interferes with a host cell defense mechanism against the parasite.
Several of the host kinases required for Plasmodium proliferation in erythrocytes are also implicated in the replication of other pathogens; for example, c-MET is implicated in infections with Plasmodium, the bacterium Listeria, as well as Influenza and Ebola viruses (4). This raises the prospect of broad-spectrum anti-infective based on inhibitors of selected kinases.

1. Haqshenas G, Wu J, Simpson KJ, Daly RJ, Netter HJ, Baumert TF, Doerig C. (2017) Signalome-wide assessment of host cell response to hepatitis C virus. Nature Communications 8:15158. doi: 10.1038/ncomms15158
2. Haqshenas G, Terradas G, Paradkar PN, Duchemin JB, McGraw EA, Doerig, C. (2019)  A Role for the Insulin Receptor in the Suppression of Dengue Virus and Zika Virus in Wolbachia-Infected Mosquito Cells.  Cell Reports 26(3):529-535.e3.
3. Adderley et al., under review
4. Haqshenas &Doerig (2019) Targeting of host cell receptor tyrosine kinases by intracellular pathogens. Science Signaling 12:599


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EPFL - Idorsia Joint Symposium

EPFL: Bruno Correia, Michele De Palma, Bart Deplancke, Federico Giberti, Felix Naef, Philippe Renaud, Gisou van der Goot, Martin Vetterli Idorsia: Martine Clozel, Julien Hazemann, Cedric Leroy, Elisa Liberatore, Christoph Sager, Catherine Vaillant

The symposium aims to tighten the relationship between EPFL and Idorsia, a Basel based biopharmaceutical company specialized in the discovery and development of small molecules to provide innovative therapeutic possibilities. Presentations and discussions will explore potential research and students collaborations.

A unique opportunity to exchange with actors from industry. The School of Life Sciences Innovation initiative Catalyze4Life encourage scientists and students interested in biopharmaceutical developments to attend.

Free registration required

PROGRAM

  • 13:00 Welcoming word – Gisou van der Goot, School of Life Sciences Dean
  • 13:10 Welcoming word – Martine Clozel, Idorsia CSO
  • 13:20 'Microfluidic flow cytometry' – Philippe Renaud, EPFL
  • 13:40 'Leveraging Orexin receptor structures for drug design – Christoph Sager and Catherine Vaillant, Idorsia
  • 14:00 'Rational protein design driving innovation towards novel biologics and cell-based therapies' – Bruno Correia, EPFL
  • 14:20 'Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase (PDHK): a difficult to reach but appealing cancer target' – Cedric Leroy, Idorsia 14:40
  • Coffee Break
  • 15:20 'Perspective of industry projects for Master students' – Felix Naef, EPFL
  • 15:40 'Atomistic modelling of stability and properties of drug molecules with machine learning' – Federico Giberti, EPFL
  • 16:00 ‘Challenges in Maching Learning-assisted Drug Design (MLDD)’ – part I – Julien Hazemann and Lisa Liberatore, Idorsia
  • 16:20 ‘Engineering dentritic cell vaccines for cancer immunotherapy’ – Miki De Palma, EPFL
  • 16:40 ‘Challenges in Maching Learning-assisted Drug Design (MLDD)’ – part II – Julien Hazemann and Elisa Liberatore, Idorsia
  • 17:00 Closing comments – Martin Vetterli, EPFL President
  • 17:10 ‘How to strenghten ties between EPFL and Idorsia’ – Discussion (on invitation only)
  • 18:30 End of Symposium

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2020 CCMX Winter School “Nanoparticles: from fundamentals to applications in life sciences”

Featured speakers include Paul Bowen (EPFL), Ruth Schmid (Sintef), Peter Wick (Empa), Cordula Hirsch (Empa), Matthias Rösslein (Empa), Neill Liptrott (University of Liverpool), Marco Siccardi (University of Liverpool), Fanny Caputo (Sintef), Christophe Studer (Vareala), Gerrit Borchard (University of Geneva), Adriele Prina-Mello (Trinity College Dublin), Beat Flühmann (Vifor Pharma), Christoph Geers (AMI/NanoLockin), Sofiya Matviykiv (Empa) and Inge Herrmann (Empa.) 

The CCMX Winter School will once again take place in Kandersteg, Switzerland and aims to bring together a group of no more than 24 PhD students from various research institutions. This course is designed to cover a series of important scientific aspects regarding the development, characterization and application of nanoparticles for medical applications and to provide an in-depth review of their corresponding fundamentals. It aims to offer a skill set relevant to the participants’ research projects and future careers.

Scientists highly recognized in their fields will cover important aspects, ranging from fundamentals in material synthesis and characterization via pre-clinical safety aspects and translational needs all the way to clinical challenges.

Presentations from small groups of participants and lectures will fill up the mornings and early evenings, while the afternoons are mostly left free for winter sports and networking. This course may be validated for 2 ECTS credits in the doctoral programs of EPFL, ETH Zurich and other universities after acceptance by the corresponding institution.

 


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Fluidic force microscopy: opening new avenues for single-cell analysis

Dr. Orane Guillaume-Gentil, Institute of Microbiology, ETHZ.

Current single-cell technologies require cell isolation and lysis, precluding dynamic measurements, downstream functional analysis, or cell-cell interaction studies. Using fluidic force microscopy, which features a miniaturized pipette matching the scale of individual cells, Orane Guillaume-Gentil developed approaches that enable selective perturbation and molecular profiling of single cells. These methods uniquely preserve the cell viability and microenvironment, redefining the frontiers of single-cell analysis.

Orane Guillaume-Gentil obtained a M.Sc. degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the ETHZ in 2004. She did her PhD thesis in Biomedical Engineering at the ETHZ with Prof. Dr. Janos Vörös, developing smart biointerfaces for tissue engineering. She received her PhD in 2011, and moved then to the biology department at the ETHZ, in the laboratory of Prof. Dr. Julia Vorholt, where she is now senior scientist. Over the last 8 years, she has been driving the development of the FluidFM technology for single-cell biology.
 


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Swiss Cytometry Meeting 2020

https://swisscytomeeting.epfl.ch/speakers/

Dear colleagues,
After a successful first meeting in February 2018, which was met with a lot of enthusiasm from both attendees and commercial companies, we are delighted to announce the organization of the second Swiss Cytometry Meeting. This conference will take place at the SwissTech Convention Center in Lausanne from the 5th to the 7th of February 2020 and we would like to invite you to join us for this second meeting.
We hope that this conference will strengthen and consolidate the ties among the cytometry community across Switzerland as we see this conference as the perfect opportunity to discuss ideas and science, interact and socialize. We also hope the program we have put together will raise interest and stimulate discussion among the delegates.
We look forward to seeing you at this second Swiss Cytometry Meeting in Lausanne.
Best Regards,
The organizing committee


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[EPFL Swiss Federal Offices Day | Research Day]



Save the date to explore research funding opportunities offered by Swiss Federal Offices!

Aim
Don’t miss the opportunity to get

  • an overview of the landscape of funding opportunities offered by Swiss Federal Offices
  • an insight into the Swiss Federal Offices vision for the next few years
  • network with representatives from main Swiss Federal Offices
  • best practices and tips for submission given by former grantees
 This is the perfect opportunity for researchers to obtain all the necessary information and put their questions directly to the people responsible.

Already several Offices confirmed their participation:
  • armasuisse
  • Federal Food Safety & Veterinary Office
  • Federal Office for Agriculture
  • Federal Office for Civil Protection
  • Federal Office for the Environment
  • Federal Office of Civil Aviation
  • Federal Office of Communications
  • Federal Office of Information Technology, Systems and Telecommunication
  • Federal Office of Public Health
  • Federal Office of Topography swisstopo
  • Federal Office of Transport
  • Federal Roads Office
  • Swiss Agency for Development & Cooperation
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Intellectual Property
  • Swiss Federal Office of Energy
>> Full programme here
>> Flyer here

Registration
This event is open to any researcher from EPFL as well as from any other Swiss research institution
Registration fees: free for EPFL Memembers; CHF 80.- for external visitors.
>> Registration here

We look forward to seeing you at this unique event to meet with Federal Offices representatives!
For any questions, please contact research@epfl.ch.
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Doctoral school of Advanced Manufacturing (EDAM) annual meeting

See enclosed program

The meeting will gather outstanding speakers from the academic and industrial world that will present various topics related to advanced manufacturing (see attached program for details). In parallel, all the PhD students from the doctoral school EDAM will present their latest results, during a lively poster session where you will have an opportunity to discuss and exchange ideas with them.   The meeting will take place in Microcity Neuchâtel is opened to everyone at EPFL.  

For organizational purpose, please register in the provided link.
Register here: https://epfl.doodle.com/poll/bipxbvh2qhx4m2d


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AI & Gender: A Practical Human Rights Toolbox

Caitlin Kraft-Buchman CEO/Founder of Women at the Table  & Asako Hattori, human rights officer at the Women’s Human Rights and Gender Section, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UN Human Rights– – OHCHR)

“Bias is to AI what rust is to steel. It corrupts decisions, leaving us unsure of the integrity of our systems, dooming them to failure.” MIT Technology Review Dec 2019

Workshop:

Background
Why and where can algorithms be gender biased? How can a human rights based approach be applied to computer science, engineering and innovation? Research shows that bias is in play in every aspect of modern life and has substantial, far-reaching impacts on our work environments, private life and culture.
We are at a critical turning point. In order to innovate and thrive in a rapidly changing global environment, new norms are needed. The “standardized male” is the default of flawed systems and cultural standards that currently control how we live and work - defaults so normalized we don’t even notice. From 20th century drug trials, international standards, city transit systems and global trading rules to 21st century algorithmic decision making and machine learning systems, this default has proven to harm people - and the bottom line.
In this crucial moment when AI is transforming every aspect of our lives and the very fabric of our society - potentially the greatest global paradigm shift yet - it is crystal clear that the design and deployment of AI must be grounded in human rights. Similarly, gender equality - the very heart of human rights - must be included in AI design and deployment.
Particularly urgent given the scale at which Automated Decision-Making (ADM) systems and machine learning are being deployed, we need scientists and engineers that understand the gender dimensions of their work and the implications their work has for all citizens, so that we all can thrive.

Who is this workshop for?
EPFL undergraduate and graduate students

Workshop
The Digital Humanities Institute in collaboration with the Equal Opportunities Office will host a 3 hour practical, agile and interactive workshop ‘AI & Gender: A Human Rights Toolbox’ for students on the EPFL Campus. Using gender as a prism to understand a human rights framework that underscores AI, the interactive workshop will foster reflection on the stereotypes, biases and gendered roles of both women and men, with the intention of understanding what real-life constraints hinder equality in the working environments and the output of computer scientists and engineers. The workshop will increase participant awareness of the relevance of gender and bias in their work and to their workplace and provides a unique opportunity to develop, deepen, and apply gender equality learnings, putting learning into action, ultimately leading to better decision-making, excellence in science, and improved practices.

Objectives
Applying a human-rights based approach this workshop will develop and strengthen awareness as well as the understanding of gender equality and gender bias as a first step towards behavioural change, and the integration of a gender perspective into everyday work of computer science and engineering.
Throughout the workshop, participants will complete a variety of interactive exercises, discussion and activities. The workshop will be supported by specific training materials including a gender-responsive checklist tailored for computer science and engineering students, faculty and staff for use to embed gender across their research and day-to-day work.
Following the workshop (after 4-6 weeks), participants will be invited to attend a voluntary additional 1.5 hour session to focus on the application of the checklists to real-life research and design scenarios. This follow-up session will allow participants to reflect on the initial training and lessons learnt and have the opportunity to share insights that have come up in their research, design, development and learning environments.

Learning outcomes:
Upon completion EPFL students will have the knowledge and skills to:
  • Explain a human rights based approach to AI ;
  • Identify relevance of different biases and importance of gender equality to computer science and engineering / institutional objectives;
  • Analyze how gender bias has occurred or can occur in the research, design and development of AI;
  • Apply how and when to use gender inclusive tools and techniques to mitigate gender bias in AI;
  • Evaluate concrete methods to integrate gender into design, planning and implementation of AI projects.

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LiDAR for Autonomous Vehicles in China

Prof. Dr. Zhengxi Cheng,
Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/936686006

Abstract: Autonomous vehicles are a revolution to the traditional vehicle industry, where the key component lies in the Lidar for the self-driving cars. In recent years, quite a lot of Lidar start-up companies emerge in China. With the direct help from these Chinese Lidar companies and industry consulting companies, I will present the current developments of the mechanical and the solid-state Lidars for autonomous vehicles in China. A bold forecast for the bright future will be also discussed.

Bio: Zhengxi Cheng received M.Sc. degree in microelectronics and solid-state electronics from Fudan University in 2007 and Ph.D. degree in microelectronics and solid-state electronics from Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2012. Since 2007, he has worked in Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics. He has been promoted to an Associate Professor since 2013. From 2015 to 2017, he was a visiting researcher with the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Japan. His research is focused on opto-electronic integrated circuit, optical MEMS devices technology.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Carmine Settembre, Telethon Foundation, Italy

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Research:
The main research interest of my laboratory is to understand the regulation and the role of the lysosomal-autophagy pathway in both physiological and disease processes. In particular,keepingin mind that the lysosomal-autophagy pathway is dynamically regulated in response to changes in the extracellular environment, my laboratory is exploring the hypothesis that thedevelopmental regulation of this pathway isan important contributor to organismal development and growth. Using a combination of mouse genetics, cell biology and pharmacological approaches my lab has recently demonstrated that autophagy is induced in growing bonesduring post-natal development and regulates the secretion of collagens, the major componentsof cartilage ECM.The post-natal induction of autophagy is mediated by the FGF signaling, demonstrating that growth factor signalling can promote organismal growth through the activation of autophagy. Ourstudies will have the potential to identify new pathways through which growth factors regulate cellular catabolism, to explain how catabolic processes support anabolic pathways in vivo, and to provide proof of principle that developmental disorders may be treated by modulation of cellular metabolism.
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IMX Seminar Series - To be defined

Prof. Hegoi Manzano, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain


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Jupyter notebooks for teaching and learning

Cécile Hardebolle

What are the good reasons to flip a class? How to flip your class? This workshop will introduce the participants to the various forms of flipped classroom designs and to the different instructional techniques that can be used. Hands-on activities will allow the participants to work on the design of their own course.


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Development and Deployment of Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs): Humanity’s Moonshot for the 21st Century

Prof. Christopher W. JONES,
School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA

ChE-606 - Highlights in Energy Research seminar series
Worldwide energy demand is projected to grow strongly in the coming decades, with most of the growth in developing countries.  Even with unprecedented growth rates in the development of renewable energy technologies such as solar, wind and bioenergy, the world will continue to rely on fossil fuels as the predominant energy source for at least the next several decades.  Simultaneously, due to decades of inaction, most current climate models suggest that limiting warming to <2°C will require large scale deployment of negative emissions technologies (NETs).  NETs, which remove CO2 from the atmosphere, are projected to be needed at a scale of 10 Gt/y by 2050, yet today, virtually none of been deployed.1 NETs may be natural or technological, with one of the most scalable technological approaches being the direct capture of CO2 from the air, or “direct air capture” (DAC).2 Because of the ultra-dilute nature of air, the separation of CO2 from this mixture presents a significant engineering challenge.

In this lecture, I will describe the design and synthesis, characterization and application of new supported amine materials that we have developed as cornerstones of new technologies for the removal of CO2 from dilute (flue gas) and ultra-dilute (air) gas streams.3 These chemisorbents efficiently remove CO2 from simulated flue gas streams, and the CO2 capacities are actually enhanced by the presence of water, unlike in the case of physisorbents such as zeolites.  We will describe the development of these materials, how they integrate into scalable DAC technologies, as well as their key physicochemical structure-property relationships.  DAC technologies offer an interesting case study for the parallel design of materials, unit operations, and processes in chemical engineering.

1. https://nas-sites.org/dels/studies/cdr/
2. “Direct Capture of CO2 from Ambient Air.” E. S. Sanz-Pérez, C. R. Murdock, S. A. Didas, C. W. Jones, Chemical Reviews, 2016, 116, 11840-11876.
3. “Amine-Oxide Hybrid Materials for CO2 Capture from Ambient Air.” S. A. Didas, S. Choi, W. Chaikittisilp, C. W. Jones, Accounts of Chemical Research, 2015, 48, 2680-2687.
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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Philipp Kukura, Oxford University, UK

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:


Bio:
I was born in Bratislava, then Czechoslovakia and moved to Germany at the age of four, where I grew up. I read Chemistry at St Hugh’s College Oxford until 2002 and did a PhD at the University of California, Berkeley with Rich Mathies in ultrafast spectroscopy before moving to ETH Zurich to work with Vahid Sandoghdar on nano-optics. After returning to Oxford initially as an EPSRC Career Acceleration Fellow in 2010, I was elected to a tutorial fellowship at Exeter College in 2011 and promoted to Full Professor in 2016. Recent awards include those by the Royal Society of Chemistry (Harrison-Meldola 2011 and Marlow 2015), the European Biophysical Society Association (Young Investigator Medal 2017), a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2018) and selection as a UK Blavatnik Award Finalist (2018). I also hold an ERC Starting Investigator Grant.
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PolyMac : Hippies & Internet

Prof. Eduardo Sanchez

☮️ Comment les hippies ont inventé Internet (et tout le reste)

L'informatique est aujourd'hui au centre d'une immense révolution industrielle, économique, culturelle et sociale, utilisant Internet comme principal vecteur de diffusion. Les transformations créées par cette révolution sont multiples et il est alors intéressant d'étudier l'idéologie politique dans laquelle se nourrissent les dirigeants des principales entreprises de la Silicon Valley, une idéologie qui continue d'irriguer cette Mecque technologique.

Ayant connu l'échec de l'utopie hippie, ces dirigeants rêvent de construire un nouveau monde, gouverné par un capitalisme radical et hyper individualiste, avec un grand ennemi: l'État et ses lois et règles collectives.

Cette conférence présentera un bref résumé historique de la naissance de cette idéologie, de ses principaux inspirateurs et de sa situation actuelle.
 


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Rizlan Bernier-Latmani, EPFL

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:

Rizlan Bernier-Latmani is an Associate Professor of Environmental Microbiology at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL). She earned her Ph.D. from Stanford University and was a post-doctoral researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, CA. She has published > 50 peer-reviewed papers (h index = 20). Her research interests include geomicrobiology, particularly the metabolic activity of microorganisms and their impact on biogeochemical cycling of trace elements. She has used a combination of tools, ranging from metagenomic and metaproteomic analysis to x-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy to unravel specific metal transformation processes in natural and laboratory settings. She has extensive experience with field-work. Her past work has focused on uranium biogeochemistry as a tool for bioremediation of contaminated sites, but also, deep subsurface microbiology, to help constrain modeling for microbial processes in geological nuclear waste disposal.
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IMX Seminar Series - Developments in high speed structural imaging of low dimensional materials: from millions of images to a few numbers

Prof. Angus Kirkland, University of Oxford, U.K.

I will describe recent developments using high speed direct electron detectors and machine learning to automatically map defect and adatom migrations in in low dimensional materials from large data sets.
I will then show how this approach can be extended to probe the local kinetics of defect transitions. Finally, I will discuss the use of similar detectors in electron ptychography, in particular under low dose conditions for quantitative phase recovery from biological macromolecules.
Bio: Professor Angus Kirkland was awarded his MA and PhD from the University of Cambridge and has held the posts of Professor of Materials at Oxford since 2005 and JEOL Professor of Electron Microscopy since 2013. In 2016 he was appointed as Director of the National Physical Sciences Imaging Centre at Diamond Lightsource and is also a Science Director at the recently established Rosalind Franklin Institute.

He was awarded the MSA prize in 2005, the Rose prize in 2015, the Quadrennial prize of the European Microscopy Society in 2016 and the Agar Medal for Electron Microscopy in 2017.

He served as General Secretary of the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy in from 2014 -2018 and was elected President in 2018.
He has also served as Editor in Chief of Ultramicroscopy since 2010.


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Pitches&Cheese: EPFL Deep Tech Solutions Addressing Grand Societal Challenges



As one of the Founding Member of the Deep Tech Week, join us to our first Pitches & Cheese event as part of the Deep Tech Week featuring EPFL start-ups, an expert roundtable discussion and a traditional Swiss networking Apéro.

As a scientific institution at the forefront of break-through science, EPFL plays a critical role in addressing the grand societal challenges of our time. Today’s problems require interdisciplinary expertise and technology to scale disruptive solutions – criteria that are at the heart of a technological university like EPFL.
As one of the two Federal Institutes of Technologies in Switzerland we have a unique opportunity to develop deep technologies that address the grand societal challenges of our time.

Pitches & Cheese will present EPFL start-ups, which provide innovative deep tech solutions that have the potential to address the grand societal challenges of our time. The start-up pitches are followed by an expert roundtable discussion and we will conclude the event with a traditional Swiss networking Apéro.


About Deep Tech Week
From 9 to 13 March 2020, the all week will bring together the best in deep tech in order to start building solutions for the future. Events, debates, roundtables and various workshops will be organized at some of Paris’ top economic and scientific hubs. Read more 

Location
The event will take place at the Swiss Ambassy in Paris (142, rue de Grenelle - 75007 Paris)
Register to participate
 
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Lecture Demonstrations in the age of YouTube

Ilya Eigenbrot

Demonstrations have been used to make lectures more interesting and accessible for a very long time – but is there any point in investing time and effort into demonstrations in the age of smartphones and instant YouTube clips? This workshop will discuss this question, as well as give practical tips on designing and using demonstrations in different settings. You will also get the chance to design one or more demos relevant to your own area of teaching expertise. Facilitated by Ilya Eigenbrot with 20 year experience in the popularisation of science.


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Francesca Baldelli Bombelli, Politecnico Milano, Italy

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:

Francesca Baldelli Bombelli is associate Professor in Chemistry at the Politecnico di Milano. She currently works at the Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering in the SupraBioNanoLab (www.suprabionano.eu). She has been Group Leader at the European Centre of Nanomedicine (www.nanomedicen.eu) in 2013-2015. In 2011-2014 she has been Lecturer in Nanotechnology and Colloid Science at the School of Pharmacy, UEA, Norwich, UK. She has been Post-Doc researcher: 2009-2011 at CBNI, University College of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2006-2009 at the University of Florence; 2004-2006 at Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden. She got her PhD in Chemical Sciences in 2004 at the University of Florence.
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AI-enhanced vision: seeing the invisible

Prof. Dr. George Barbastathis,
MIT


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/506874457

Abstract: If you point your camera to a scene, and the camera registers nothing—does it mean that nothing was really there? Hardly! The camera pixels measure “raw” light intensity where the encoded information often is much richer than a human observer could tell just by looking at the pixels on a screen. Which algorithms, then, should one apply to decode the raw intensity and reveal the hidden scene?
In this seminar, I will describe how to use Deep Neural Networks (DNNs), a form of Machine Learning (ML) algorithm, to perform this decoding. During the training stage of the DNN, physically generated objects are used to produce the encoded raw intensities. From these pairs of objects and raw intensities the DNN learns the association between the scenes and their encoded representations. After training, given a new scene, the DNN decodes it correctly to produce a final reconstructed image that is meaningful to a human observer.
With my research group, we applied this approach to three challenging instances of invisibility: transparent objects, also known as “phase objects,” whose raw intensities are highly rippled diffraction patterns; phase objects that are also very dark, i.e. the diffraction patterns are also highly attenuated; and objects hidden behind or surrounded by diffusers, e.g. frosted glass or multiple layers of glass patterned with sharp light-scattering features.
It is important to emphasize that in our work ML is not used in the traditional way to interpret the scenes; rather, it is used to form interpretable representations of scenes in situations where traditional ML would be helpless due to physical limitations in the optics. The cooperation of ML with physical models proved to be very powerful in this work and, beyond, is certain to impact many fundamental and applied aspects of physical and life sciences and engineering.

Bio: George Barbastathis received the Diploma in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1993 from the National Technical University of Athens (Πολυτεχνείο) and the MSc and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1994 and 1997, respectively, from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech.) After post-doctoral work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, he joined the faculty at MIT in 1999, where he is now Professor of Mechanical Engineering. He has worked or held visiting appointments at Harvard University, the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) Centre, the National University of Singapore, and the University of Michigan – Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute (密西根交大學院) in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. His research interests are in machine learning and optimization for computational imaging and inverse problems; and optical system design, including artificial optical materials and interfaces. He is member of the Society for Photo Instrumentation Engineering (SPIE), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE), and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). In 2010 he was elected Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) and in 2015 he was a recipient of China’s Top Foreign Scholar (“One Thousand Scholar”) Award.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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The impact of sex hormones on breast cancer: humanizing mice to personalize prevention and treatment

Dr Cathrin Brisken, SV / ISREC / UPBRI

Abstract :
A woman’s risk to get breast cancer and the course of her disease are affected by her reproductive history and exposures to exogenous hormone and endocrine disruptors. Therapeutics targeting estrogen receptor signalling have had a major impact on breast cancer survival and a key question is how additional pathways can be harnessed to personalize breast cancer therapy and prevention. Combining mouse genetics with innovative tissue recombination techniques, we established the sequential mode of action of reproductive hormones in breast development, with paracrine and cell-intrinsic mechanisms impinging on cell fate determination and oncogenic potential. However, substantial differences in mammary carcinogenesis between mice and humans and the lack of adequate models for the human disease hampered progress. We have overcome this hurdle by demonstrating that by grafting human breast cancer cells to the milk ducts of immunocompromised mice the cells recapitulate the disease process and conserve their hormone and drug sensitivities. Studies have been expanded to the human population level using breast tissue derived from a large cohort of women with different levels of circulating sex hormones exposure to discern factors determining hormone response with topology-based algorithms that we have developed. The implications for new preventive and therapeutic strategies will be discussed.

Short Bio :
Cathrin Brisken obtained MD and PhD in Biophysics from the University of Göttingen, Germany, did postdoctoral work at the Whitehead Institute, MIT, Cambridge, USA, and held appointments at the Whitehead Institute, the Cancer Center of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research. She was Dean of the EPFL Doctoral School and cofounded the International Cancer Prevention Institute. She has served on many international committees and advisory boards, currently including AACR Women in Cancer Research Council, International Breast Cancer Study Group Biological Protocol Working Group, Pezcoller Symposia Scientific Committee.
 
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IMX Seminar Series - Life on nano: engineering surfaces of colloidal nanoparticles for life science applications

Prof. Lucia Curri, University of Bari, Italy

In the last years, the extraordinary advances in the field of nanomaterial science have resulted in a great potential for applications in life science. A variety of preparative and post-preparative colloidal routes have demonstrated the ability to obtain a wide choice of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) and nanocrystals (NCs), with different compositions, that can be achieved with a high control on size, shape and surface chemistry, ultimately tailoring their electronic, optical, magnetic, thermal and chemical size dependent properties.
A range of functionalization strategies have been developed to suitably engineer the surface of NPs and NCs and tune their specific chemical reactivity towards the surrounding environment. The control of nano-bio interfaces has demonstrated to be essential to enable nanomaterials conjugation and combination with biologically relevant entities, thus producing advanced materials for diagnosis and therapy.
The ability of engineering the surface of specialized nanomaterials, such as semiconductors, plasmonic and magnetic nanostructures, with tailored procedures, allowing to ingeniously combine NPs and NCs with peptides, drugs and other significant biological systems, is decisive for their application in diagnosis and treatment of different diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Examples of drug delivery, labelling, diagnostic and theranostics systems, based on the combination of NIR photoactive nanomaterials, plasmonic nanostructures and magnetic NPs with relevant biological functions will be illustrated.

- C. Ingrosso, M. Corricelli, F. Bettazzi, E. Konstantinidou,  G. V. Bianco, N. Depalo, M. Striccoli, A. Agostiano, M. L. Curri, I. Palchetti  (2019) J. Mater. Chem. B., 7, 768-777
- N. Depalo, M. Corricelli, I. De Paola, G. Valente, R. M. Iacobazzi, E. Altamura, D. Debellis, D. Comegna, E. Fanizza, N. Denora. V. Laquintana. F. Mavelli. M. Striccoli, M. Saviano, A. Agostiano, A. Del Gatto, L. Zaccaro, M. L. Curri (2017) ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 9 (49), 43113–43126.
- N. Depalo, R. M. Iacobazzi, G. Valente, I. Arduino, S. Villa, F. Canepa, V. Laquintana, E. Fanizza, M. Striccoli, A. Cutrignelli, A. Lopedota, P. Porcelli, A. Azzariti, M. Franco, M. L. Curri, N. Denora (2017) Nano Research, 10, 2431–2448.
- G. Valente, N. Depalo, I. de Paola, R. M. Iacobazzi, N. Denora, V. Laquintana, R. Comparelli, E. Altamura, T. Latronico, M. Altomare, E. Fanizza, M. Striccoli, A. Agostiano, M. Saviano, A. Del Gatto, L. Zaccaro, M. L. Curri (2016) Nano Research, 9, 644-662.
- E. Fanizza, R. M. Iacobazzi, V. Laquintana, G. Valente, G. Caliandro, M. Striccoli, A. Agostiano, A. Cutrignelli, A. Lopedota, M. L. Curri, M. Franco, N. Depalo, N. Denora (2016) Nanoscale, 6, 3350-3361
Bio: M. Lucia Curri received her PhD from the University of Bari in 1997, between 1995 and 1996 was Research Assistant at Chemistry Department of University College London (UK), then in 1997 she started working at CNR, first as research scientist and since 2010 as senior research scientist. In October 2018 she has been appointed full professor of Physical Chemistry at Chemistry Department of University of Bari Aldo Moro.
She has a solid expertise in surface engineering of nanoparticles and nanocrystals, in order to achieve bioconjugation, organization into mesoscale structures (films, 2/3 D assemblies) with tailored functional collective properties and integration in nanocomposites for their micro/nano fabrication by means of conventional and innovative techniques.
She is involved in the development of synthetic strategies for the preparation and functionalization of colloidal nanocrystals based inorganic materials, both for fundamental and application studies. In particular, the potential of such nanomaterials in biomedical field, including theranostic systems for diagnosis and therapy of different diseases, in environmental technologies, including detection and degradation of pollutants, and in energy conversion is investigated.
She has been and is coordinator and research unit PI in several National and International research projects in the field of synthesis, functionalization and applications of colloidal nanoparticles, and has also coordinated the European Project 7th FP LIMPID "Nanocomposite Materials for Photocatalytic Degradation of Pollutants" (G.A. 310177).
Lucia Curri has been and is member of several Conference Committees and Boards, of Panel PE5 for ERC Consolidator grant (2016-2018) and expert evaluator for European Commission (FP7 and H2020 projects) and various other International funding agencies.
She is member of the Chemical Science Doctoral Board at University of Bari and member of evaluation committees for international PhD theses.
She is co-author of over 220 papers, including more than 170 articles on JCR peer-reviewed journals and many other publications such as 10 chapters in books and several conference proceedings in national and international conferences, also as invited speaker ( (H index= 40 source Scopus, H index= 42, source Google Scholar - Jan 2020).
 


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Ovijit Chaudhuri, Stanford University, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:

Dr. Ovijit Chaudhuri is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He earned a B.S. in engineering physics with a minor in mathematics at UC Berkeley. Then, he obtained his Ph.D. in bioengineering at UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco, studying force generation and mechanics of actin cytoskeletal networks with Prof. Daniel Fletcher. From there, he went on to do a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University, studying cell mechanotransduction and developing engineered biomaterials for 3D culture with Prof. David Mooney. He joined Stanford in 2013, and his research interests are in cell biophysics and mechanotransduction. His honors include a DARPA young faculty award, an American Cancer Society research scholar award, and a National Research Service Award. His group’s research has been supported by the NIH, the NSF, the American Cancer Society, DARPA, and Stanford’s Bio-X Institute.
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IMX Seminar Series - The Remarkable Influence of Zr-doping on the Chemistry and Reactivity of Ceria

Prof. Sossina Haile, Northwestern, USA

Zirconia substituted ceria is a widely studied material system with immense importance in heterogeneous catalysis. Enhancements to a range of properties in the oxide have been attributed to the presence of zirconium, in particular, oxygen storage capacity, oxygen mobility, and surface reaction rate. All of these features have furthermore been connected with the observation of an increase in the concentration of reduced Ce3+ species in the presence of Zr4+. Using a suite of characterization tools we establish the precise role that zirconium plays in controlling these properties. Our bulk thermogravimetric measurements reveal that in the presence of Zr the oxygen non-stoichiometry (d) of Ce1-xZrxO2-d is indeed enhanced. Using angle-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), we quantify under technologically relevant conditions the Ce3+ concentration in the surface (2-3 nm), as well as bulk regions, of ceria-zirconia films. We find that the surface of each of the oxides far is more reduced than the bulk. However, the extent to which the surface and bulk regions differ depends strongly on the Zr concentration. Specifically, with increasing Zr, the differential between the two regions diminishes. In parallel, using electrical conductivity relaxation methods, we find that the bulk chemical diffusion of oxygen decreases in the presence of Zr. These observations can be generally explained in terms of the preferred lower coordination of the small Zr4+ ion relative to the larger Ce4+ and Ce3+ ions and likely trapping of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of Zr. The substantial difference between surface and bulk properties, where even the trends are reversed, urges caution in the use of bulk-based properties as surrogate descriptors for surface characteristics.
Bio:
Sossina M. Haile is the Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, a position she assumed in 2015 after serving 18 years on the faculty at the California Institute of Technology. She earned her Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. Haile’s research broadly encompasses materials, especially oxides, for sustainable electrochemical energy technologies. She has established a new class of fuel cells with record performance for clean and efficient electricity generation, and created new thermochemical approaches for harnessing sunlight to meet rising energy demands. Amongst her many awards, in 2008 Haile received an American Competitiveness and Innovation (ACI) Fellowship from the U.S. National Science Foundation in recognition of “her timely and transformative research in the energy field and her dedication to inclusive mentoring, education and outreach across many levels.” She is a fellow of the Materials Research Society, the American Ceramics Society, the African Academy of Sciences, and the Ethiopian Academy of Sciences.


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Development of a Cortical Visual Neuroprosthesis for the blind

Prof. Eduardo Fernandez, University Miguel Hernandez and CIBER BBN, SP.

Cortical prostheses are a subgroup of visual neuroprostheses capable of evoking visual percepts in profoundly blind people through direct electrical stimulation of the occipital cortex. This approach may be the only treatment available for blindness caused by glaucoma, end-stage retinal degenerations, optic atrophy or trauma to the retina and/or optic nerves. However, there are still a relevant number of open questions and more experiments should be done to achieve the clinical goals envisioned by this new technology.
We are now facing the challenge of creating a cortical visual neuroprosthesis, based on intracortical microelectrodes, which could allow to provide a limited but useful visual sense to profoundly blind.  We will introduce preliminary results of electrical stimulation of human visual areas and review some of the principles and difficulties related to the development of a cortical visual neuroprosthesis for the blind using intracortical microelectrodes. We will emphasize the need of customize the visual prosthetic device for the needs of each patient and the role of neural plasticity in order to achieve the desired results. Finally, we will discuss some of the exciting opportunities and challenges that lie in this intersection of neuroscience research, biomedical engineering, neuro-opthalmology and neurosurgery.

Bio. Dr. Fernandez received a M.D. degree from the University of Alicante (1986) and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience with honors in 1990. He is currently Professor and Chairman of the Department of Histology and Anatomy of the University Miguel Hernández (Spain), Director of the Neural Engineering Group of the Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red (CIBER) in the subject area of Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN, Spain), and Adjunct Professor at John Moran Eye Center (University of Utah, USA). He is a qualified MD who combines biomedicine (molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology and regenerative medicine) with the physical sciences and engineering to develop innovative solutions to the problems raised by interfacing the human nervous system. In the latest years he has been coordinating several National and International projects to demonstrate the feasibility of a visual neuroprosthesis, interfaced with the occipital cortex, as a means through which a limited but useful sense of vision could be restored to profoundly blind. Furthermore, he is also working on brain plasticity and brain reorganization in severe vision loss.


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Engineering Industry Day

https://journeeindustrie.epfl.ch/en/program-2020/  

After 3 successful editions and growing number of attendees (over 600 in 2019), the School of Engineering organises the 4th edition on Wednesday March 25, 2020. The Industry Day offers different opportunities to companies, research laboratories of EPFL, as well as Master and PhD students.
For companies

  • Get informed about the state of research at EPFL
  • Meet professors, PhD students and master students
  • Initiate collaborations to foster innovation in your company
  • Present your company to students and researchers
For researchers
  • Present your research to companies
  • Invite your past and current industry partners
  • Meet with potential future industry partners and discuss collaboration opportunities
  • Take advantage of organised discussions, informal networking, and information booths
  • Establish a network for the professional integration of PhD students and postdoctoral researchers
For Master and PhD students
  • Find out about research and development in industry
  • Learn about innovation and entrepreneurship at EPFL
  • Meet potential host companies for internships, master theses in industry or future employement
In addition to the plenary presentations from industry and academia, the industry day features a technical exhibition for companies, startups, research laboratories and institutions supporting innovation. The exhibition is paired with the Salon des Technologies et de l’Innovation STIL on 2 consecutive days.
The program allows for more than four hours of networking time in the exhibition and catering space during breaks, as well as face-to-face meetings between companies and research laboratories.
We hope to welcome you at the Swisstech Convention Center on March 25 and are looking forward to offering you an interesting program.
 
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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Jacob Corn, ETHZ

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:
acob Corn is the Professor of Genome Biology at the ETH Zurich. His research aims to better understand and treat disease through next-​generation genome editing technologies. Jacob’s career has bridged academia and industry, working in therapeutic areas that include infectious disease, neurobiology, and oncology. His research takes a multidisciplinary approach, combining cellular biochemistry, functional genomics, computational biology, bioengineering, and biophysics. Jacob’s graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley explored how cells replicate and protect their genomes. His postdoctoral work at the University of Washington computationally designed protein inhibitors from scratch. Jacob began his independent research career as a group leader at Genentech, where his lab discovered biological mechanisms for challenging therapeutic targets. Jacob then moved back to academia as the founding Scientific Director of the Innovative Genomics Institute and faculty at UC Berkeley.
 
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IMX Seminar Series - To be defined

Prof. Moniek Tromp, University of Groningen, The Netherlands


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Low Frequency Wireless Power Transfer for Biomedical Implants

Prof. Dr. Shad Roundy,
University of Utah


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/975059431

Abstract: Biomedical implants hold the promise of dramatically improving our health and well-being by, for example, enabling us to pro-actively monitor health through real-time tracking of internal body chemistry (e.g. pH, glucose, lactate, tissue oxygen), treat diseases through targeted and tailored drug delivery, treat neural disorders through neural prostheses, etc.  Furthermore, advances in flexible integrated circuit technology and micro scale sensing can currently enable extremely small (< 1mm3), complex, biomedical implants.  However, systems of this size are almost never actually realized because the power system (e.g. a battery) is too large.  RF power transmission for implants has been widely investigated. However, for very small implants (~ mm3) RF power suffers from low achievable power density at the implant given safety constraints.
This talk will discuss two alternative methods for wirelessly delivering power to biomedical implants: acoustics and low frequency magnetic fields using magnetoelectric transducers. Acoustic power transmission exhibits high power density given its low attenuation in soft tissue and relatively less restrictive safety limitations. Its disadvantages are that acoustic power does not travel well through bone and the external transmitter requires intimate contact with skin. In this talk we will cover acoustic power transmission systems and demonstrate a novel glucose sensing mechanism that can be powered acoustically. Low frequency magnetic fields coupled to magnetoelectric transducers offer a promising alternative to both RF and acoustic power transmission. In this system, a standard coil is used as a transmitter, but the implantable receiver is made from magnetoelectric laminates (i.e. laminates of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric material). The magnetoelectric receivers have a much more favorable frequency/size relationship than standard RF receivers, enabling higher power density at lower frequencies that are safer for humans and have lower attenuation in tissue. In this talk I will discuss system and receiver design optimization for magnetoelectric based wireless power transfer systems. These systems are still early stage, and there is much room for innovation and improvement.

Bio: Shad Roundy is the director of the Integrated Self-Powered Sensing lab at the University of Utah which focuses on energy harvesting, wireless power transfer, and more generally applications of ubiquitous wireless sensing. Shad received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2003.  From there he moved to the Australian National University where he was a senior lecturer in the Systems Engineering Department.  He spent the next several years working with startup companies LV Sensors and EcoHarvester developing MEMS pressure sensors, accelerometers, gyroscopes, and energy harvesting devices.  In 2012, he re-entered academia joining the mechanical engineering faculty at the University of Utah.  Dr. Roundy is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, DoE Integrated Manufacturing Fellowship, the Intel Noyce Fellowship, and was named by MIT’s Technology Review as one of the world’s top 100 young innovators for 2004.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Suzie H. Pun, University of Washington, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:

Suzie H. Pun is the Robert F Rushmer Professor of Bioengineering, an Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering, and a member of the Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute at UW.  She is a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and has been recognized with the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2006 and as an AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador in 2015. She serves as an Associate Editor for ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering. Her research focus area is in biomaterials and drug delivery.
Suzie Pun received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology working under the supervision of Professor Mark E. Davis. She also worked as a senior scientist at Insert Therapeutics/Calando Pharmaceuticals developing polymeric drug delivery systems before joining the Department of Bioengineering at University of Washington.

 
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IMX Seminar Series - To be defined

Prof. Christian Serre, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France


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Campus Biotech Neuromodulation Workshop

Friedhelm Hummel (Center for Neuroprosthetics, EPFL),  Axel Thielscher (Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen), Gesa Hartwigsen (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig), Til Ole Bergmann (German Resilience Center, Mainz), Silvia Marchesotti (Dept of Basic Neurosciences, University of Geneva), Nir Grossman (UK Dementia Research Institute, Imperial College London), Marc Bächinger (Dept of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich), Estelle Raffin (Center for Neuroprosthetics, EPFL), Roland Beisteiner (Dept of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna)

The Campus Biotech is proud to host on April 7th, 2020 a one-day research-oriented workshop focusing on “Novel and Multimodal research in Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS)”.

This special event will include several lectures from experts in the field of neuromodulation as well as vendor exhibitions, demos and hands-on training sessions in state-of-the-art brain stimulation techniques combined with neuroimaging, such as Electroencephalography (EEG) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

Thanks to the equipment available at Campus Biotech, we also plan on demonstrating how to best conduct experiments involving concurrent Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and EEG, transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation and EEG, but also concurrent TMS and functional MRI! This is a unique opportunity to exchange around new technology and share precious experience and knowledge on how to best combine imaging with the many stimulation techniques available to scientists.

The registration for this event is free but the number of seats is limited in order to ensure that everyone can benefit from the experience of our experts during the hands-on sessions.

Please visit https://nmod-workshop.campusbiotech.ch for the complete list of speakers, register online and join us at Campus Biotech in Geneva on April 7th, 2020!
 


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Computational Brain Science: putting computational methods to work for neuroscience

Dr Felix Schürmann, BBP-CORE / FSV-BMI

Abstract:
My research is focussed on bringing the toolbox of computational science to neuroscience, aiming to provide a framework in which the brain’s multi-modal and multi-scale data can be related, completed and explored. For problems such as the building of biophysically detailed neuronal models, we were able to devise advanced optimization algorithms with novel error functions yielding some of the most faithful models. In other cases, such as the microconnectome, we developed first principle computational methods that derive dense parameters from sparse data through constraint resolution and forward computations. In yet other cases, such as the simulation of brain tissue models, our research transformed prior numerical methods and simulation schemes, making it possible to use massively parallel supercomputers efficiently. Lastly, we introduced analytical performance modelling to brain simulations, giving the first quantitative framework in which modelling decisions and computational cost implications can be understood. This research has enabled the Blue Brain Project and other groups to build some of the most detailed models of neurons and brain regions to date.

Short Bio
Felix Schürmann is adjunct professor at the Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), co-director of the Blue Brain Project and affiliated with the Brain Mind Institute. He studied physics at the University of Heidelberg, Germany, supported by the German National Academic Foundation. Later, as a Fulbright Scholar, he obtained his Master’s degree in Physics from SUNY at Buffalo, USA, on simulating quantum computers. He received his Ph.D. at the University of Heidelberg, Germany, under the supervision of the late Karlheinz Meier. For his thesis he co-designed an efficient implementation of a neural network in hardware. Since 2005 he is involved in EPFL’s Blue Brain Project, where he oversees all computer science research and engineering to enable reconstruction and simulation of brain tissue models at unprecedented scale and detail. Since he strongly believes that the futures of neuroscience and computing are entangled, he also directs his own research group to rethink today’s simulation capabilities and leverage neuroscience for future computing.
 
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Perovskite Solar Cells and Modules: Some Challenges and Tools to deal with them

Prof. Dr. Klaus Weber,
Australian National University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/694326308

Abstract: Perovskite Cells are complex devices consisting of several components and interfaces. Understanding the properties and interactions of the different components is very challenging, particularly when there are so many options for each of them. It is important to develop suitable tools to deal with this challenge.
In this talk I will focus on several aspects of perovskite cells. First, I will  make the case that computational modelling is an essential tool for the interpretation of experimental data, by contrasting different possible explanations for measurements obtained by different means, which shows that a less than rigorous interpretation can add to confusion, rather than provide useful information.
Second, I will discuss simulations of perovskite and perovskite – silicon modules, which focus on the potential effects of partial shading. These simulations show that great care must be taken when designing such modules so as to ensure that shading conditions that may typically be encountered during operation does not permanently damage the module.
I will conclude with some suggestions and open questions around how it may be possible to better standardise and verify experimental results , to increase the usefulness of reported results in accelerating the development of practical perovskite solar devices.

Bio: Dr Klaus Weber is Associate Professor in the Research School of Engineering at the Australian National University (ANU). He co-invented and developed several thin film cell technologies including SLIVER technology, for which he was closely involved in the commercial development including the current ARENA project (formerly with Transform Solar). He has authored over over 140 publications. He is a recipient of the Weeks Award by the International Solar Energy Society and the Alan Walsh Medal for Service to Industry by the Australian Institute of Physics. His work on SLIVER technology received numerous other awards including the Banksia Award and the Aichi World Expo Global Eco-Tech 100 award.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Patrick Couvreur, Paris-Sud University, France

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:
Patrick COUVREUR is Full Professor of Pharmacy at the Paris-Sud University and holder of the chair of “Innovation Technologique” (2009-2010) at the prestigious « Collège de France ». He is appointed as a Senior Member of the “Institut Universitaire de France” since 2009. He is also the recipient of an “ERC Advanced Grant” (2010-2015) and of an “ERC Proof of Concept” (2015-2016). He has hold many important national and international academic positions as Director of the UMR CNRS 8612 (a CNRS associated department gathering together more than 120 researchers in the drug delivery field), Director of the Doctoral School “Therapeutic Innovation” (over 300 PhD students at Paris-Sud University), founder member of the pole of competitivity MEDICEN, Extraordinary Professor at the University of Louvain (Belgium), member of the board of governors of many international scientific organizations (ie. The International Pharmaceutical Federation FIP, the Controlled Release Society CRS, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Scientists, APGI etc.). He is the chair of the LS-7 panel of the European Research Council (ERC consolidator grant) and has served in many scientific committees (Institut Pasteur, ENS Cachan, Academic Council of Paris-Saclay University, Scientific Committee of the Région Centre, Comité National of the CNRS, Conseil National des Universités CNU etc.). Prof Patrick COUVREUR’s contributions in the field of drug delivery, nanomedicine and drug targeting are highly recognized around the world with more than 500 peer review research publications (Google Scholar H-index 119 and Thomson Reuters H-index 88), some of them in prestigious journals (Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Materials, Nature Communications, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Angewandte Chemie, Cancer Research, Journal of the American Chemical Society etc.). His research is interdisciplinary, aiming at developing new nanomedicines for the treatment of severe diseases. This research is at the interface between Physico-Chemistry of Colloids, Polymer Chemistry, Material Science, Cellular and Molecular Biology and Experimental Pharmacology. Patrick COUVREUR’s research has led to the funding of two start-up companies (Bioalliance and Medsqual). Bioalliance (now ONXEO) entered the stock market in 2005 and a nanomedicine invented in Couvreur’s lab is currently finishing phase III clinical trial for the treatment of the hepatocarcinoma. The major scientific contribution of Patrick COUVREUR to the Pharmaceutical Sciences is also recognized by numerous international (the “2004 Pharmaceutical Sciences World Congress Award”, the prestigious “Host Madsen Medal”, the “European Pharmaceutical Scientist Award” of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Sciences, the European Inventor Award 2013 given by the European Patent Office and the Higuchi Award 2015, Japan) and national awards (The Grand Prix de l’Innovation of « L’USINE NOUVELLE » 2008the “Prix Galien 2009” and the “Médaille de l’Innovation 2012 of the CNRS). His appointment as a member of eight academies (Académie des Sciences, Académie des Technologies, Académie Nationale de Médecine and Académie Nationale de Pharmacie in France, as well as the Académie Royale de Médecine in Belgium, the Royal Academy of Pharmacy in Spain, the United States National Academy of Medicine and the United States National Academy of Engineering) is another recognition of major scientific and scholarly contributions of Patrick COUVREUR.
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IMX Seminar Series - Co-continuous Nanostructures in Charged Polymer Materials

Prof. Timothy P. Lodge, University of Minnesota, USA

Nanostructured materials with co-continuous structures, in which each discrete domain is independently interconnected, can simultaneously optimize “orthogonal” properties such as ion transport and mechanical strength. Potential applications include porous membranes, fuel cells, and rechargeable metal batteries. Block polymers have been exploited as templating agents to access such morphologies, for example via ordered periodic phases such as the double gyroid, or by polymerization-induced microphase separation. In such cases the conducting domains are typically ≤ 20 nm in size, which can compromise both mobility and strength. An alternate route involves blending an A–B diblock copolymer with the constituent A and B homopolymers, leading to a disordered bicontinuous microemulsion (BmE) state. We have shown that charge-free ternary A–B/A/B polymer blends universally self-assemble into the thermodynamically stable BmE phase, albeit with carefully designed molecular weights and compositions. The BmE displays globally disordered but locally correlated domains, with tunable characteristic length scales in the range of ca. 20–100 nm, well beyond the domain sizes typically associated with pure diblocks. The interesting question that arises is whether this phase can also be accessed in blends containing charge, where in general the intermolecular interactions are stronger and more long-ranged. We are exploring this issue in two cases: an A–B/A/B ternary system with added salt, and an A–B/A/B system in which one of the polymers is ionomeric.
Bio: Tim Lodge graduated from Harvard in 1975 with a B.A. cum laude in Applied Mathematics. He completed his PhD in Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin in 1980, and then spent 20 months as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at NIST. Since 1982 he has been on the Chemistry faculty at Minnesota, and in 1995 he also became a Professor of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science. In 2013 he was named a Regents Professor, the University’s highest academic rank.
He has been recognized with the American Physical Society (APS) Polymer Physics Prize (2004), the International Scientist Award from the Society of Polymer Science, Japan, (2009), the 2010 Prize in Polymer Chemistry from the American Chemical Society (ACS), and the Hermann Mark Award (2015) and the Paul Flory Education Award (2018) of the ACS Division of Polymer Chemistry. He has been elected to Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the APS, the ACS, and the Neutron Scattering Society of America. In 2016 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
From 2001–2017 Tim served as the Editor-in-Chief of the ACS journal Macromolecules. In 2011 he became the founding Editor for ACS Macro Letters. He has served as Chair of the Division of Polymer Physics, APS (1997–8), and as Chair of the Gordon Research Conferences on Colloidal, Macromolecular and Polyelectrolyte Solutions (1998) and Polymer Physics (2000). Since 2005 he has been Director of the NSF-supported Materials Research Science & Engineering Center at Minnesota. He has authored or co-authored over 450 papers in the field of polymer science, and advised or co-advised over 80 PhD students. His research interests center on the structure and dynamics of polymer liquids, including solutions, melts, blends, and block copolymers, with particular emphases on self-assembling systems using rheological, scattering and microscopy techniques.
 


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Josué Sznitman, Technion, Israel

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

CV:

Education: Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), 2007 M.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), 2003 B.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, MIT, 2002 Academic appointments: Aug 2010 - present: Senior Lecturer Dept. Biomedical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology Jan 2009 - Jul 2010: Lecturer / Research Associate Dept. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University Jan 2008 - Dec 2008: Postdoctoral Research Fellow Dept. Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics, University of Pennsylvania Sept 2003 - Dec 2007: Teaching & Research Assistant Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich
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Roll Out Swiss Solar Boat's boat



The association Swiss Solar Boat (member of the MAKE fund) aiming to participate to the Monaco Solar & Energy Boat Challenge is proud to present its first boat created by students. The unveiling will consist in a presentation of the project and the path taken, some interventions by our partners, the unveiling and an aperitif to talk about the adventure.


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Non-invasive neural inferfacing with high-information transfer with the human spinal cord

Dario Farina, Professor and Chair in Neurorehabilitation Engineering, Imperial College London, UK.

Alpha motor neurons receive synaptic input that they convert into the ultimate neural code of movement -- the neural drive to muscles. The study of the behaviour of motor neurons provides a window into the neural processing of movement. Recently, the interfacing (bioelectrodes) and processing methods for identifying the output of motor neuron pools from interference electromyogram (EMG) signals have been advanced substantially. In the past decade, these methods have indeed allowed the monitoring of the behaviour of tens to hundreds of motor neurons concurrently, with minimally invasive or non-invasive methods. This new population analysis has opened new perspectives in the study of neural control of movement. The talk will overview the technology for motor neuron interfacing as well as the potential of motor neuron recording technology for man-machine interfacing. Examples of closed-loop neural interfacing based on non-invasive decoding of spinal motor neuron behaviour will be discussed in relation to assistive and rehabilitation devices.

Bio
Dario Farina received Ph.D. degrees in automatic control and computer science and in electronics and communications engineering from the Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Nantes, France, and Politecnico di Torino, Italy, in 2001 and 2002, respectively, and an Honorary Doctorate degree in Medicine from Aalborg University, Denmark, in 2018. He is currently Full Professor and Chair in Neurorehabilitation Engineering at the Department of Bioengineering of Imperial College London, UK. He has previously been Full Professor at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, (until 2010) and at the University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Germany, where he founded and directed the Department of Neurorehabilitation Systems (2010-2016). Among other awards, he has been the recipient of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Early Career Achievement Award (2010), The Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2016), and has been elected Distinguished Lecturer IEEE (2014). He has also received continuous funding by the European Research Council since 2011. His research focuses on biomedical signal processing, neurorehabilitation technology, and neural control of movement. Within these areas, he has (co)-authored >450 papers in peer-reviewed Journals, which have currently received >27,000 citations. Professor Farina has been the President of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK) (2012-2014) and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the official Journal of this Society, the Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. He is also currently an Editor for Science Advances, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on Medical Robotics and Bionics, Wearable Technologies, and the Journal of Physiology. Professor Farina has been elected Fellow IEEE, AIMBE, ISEK, EAMBES.


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Exploring interfacial physics to inspire disrupting technologies

Prof. Dr. Dimos Poulikakos,
ETH Zürich


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/440644837

Abstract: Interfaces separating different kinds of matter, or different phases of the same matter, abandon in nature and technology. What is more, they invariably play a critical role in all systems where they occur, from regulating transport of energy and species, to dictating system shape and form. Interfaces differ in their structure and properties from the bulk matter they surround. I note here the famous quote of Wolfgang Pauli that “God made bulk (materials) but surfaces are the work of the devil”. Interfaces are of course of critical importance in small scale systems and even more so as we move toward nanoscales, where their proportion in a given system increases dramatically and their effect dominates system behaviour.

In this lecture I will primarily focus on liquid/gas and liquid/solid interfaces as they manifest themselves in simple systems, such as small droplets and nanoparticles, in particular when they are at a metastable thermodynamic state or under the regulated influence of an external field (gravitational, acoustic, electric or electromagnetic), showing in parallel novel applications deriving from understanding their physics.  

First, I will address the spontaneous removal of discrete condensed matter from surfaces, of importance in nature and in a broad range of technologies, e.g. self-cleaning, anti-icing, and condensation. The understanding of phenomena leading to such behavior, combined with rational micro/nano surface texture design promoting their manifestation, remain a challenge. I will show how water droplets resting on superhydrophobic surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behavior, i.e. sequential droplet-substrate collisions with restitution coefficients greater than unity, despite complete surface rigidity, seemingly violating the second law of thermodynamics. Due to the high-vaporization rates experienced by droplets, and the inherently associated significant cooling, freezing from a metastable state can occur. I will show how increasing vaporization —triggered suddenly by metastable state freezing— has a strong boosting effect and can spontaneously remove surface icing (by levitating or even launching away generated icy drops/particles) the moment they freeze. This work exemplifies how surface texturing aware of such interfacial phenomena alone, can prohibit water droplet retention on surfaces, also when they freeze.

Next, a remarkably simple process for the maskless direct printing of nanoparticles of all kinds, through electrohydrodynamic “NanoDrip” printing of colloidal nanodroplets will be presented and the related interfacial physics and transport phenomena leading to the tunable formation of in- and out-of-plane functional nanostructures as single entities or large arrays will be explained.  A host of applications enabled by NanoDrip printing will be discussed, ranging from plasmonics, driven by single photon emitters (quantum dots, or even precisely printed single organic molecules) to the printing of transparent conductive grids and to tracking force microscopy (TFM) methods for cells with unprecedented facility and resolution.

Finally, I will discuss the controllable manipulation of biological and synthetic nanoscopic species in liquids at the ultimate single object resolution (biological quantum level), important to many fields such as biology, medicine, physics, chemistry and nanoengineering. I will present the concept of electrokinetic nanovalving, with which we confine and guide single biological nano-objects in a liquid, solely based on spatiotemporal tailoring of the free energy landscape guiding the motion. The electric field generating this energy landscape is readily modulated collaboratively by wall nanotopography and by addressable embedded nanoelectrodes in a nanochannel. I will demonstrate guiding, confining, releasing and sorting of biological nano-objects, ranging from macromolecules to adenoviruses, but also a broad palette of other nano-objects such as lipid vesicles, dielectric and metallic particles, of various sizes and inherent charges, suspended in electrolytes with to biological buffer solution levels. Such systems can enable individual handling of multiple entities as well as simultaneously obtaining accurate information of the properties of their such as electrical conductivity and permittivity, in applications ranging from chemical or biochemical synthesis to precise drug delivery, in a continuous lab-on-chip environment with biological quantum level resolution.


Bio: Professor Dimos Poulikakos holds the Chair of Thermodynamics at ETH Zurich, where in 1996 he founded the Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies in the Institute of Energy Technology. He served as the Vice President of Research of ETH Zurich in the period 2005-2007. Professor Poulikakos was the ETH director of the IBM-ETH Binnig-Rohrer Nanotechnology center, a unique private-public partnership in nanotechnology at the interface of basic research and future oriented applications (2008-2011). He served as the Head of the Mechanical and Process Engineering Department at ETH Zurich (2011-2014). He is currently the Chairperson of the Energy Science Center of ETH Zurich and a member of CORE, the advisory board of the Swiss government on issues related to energy. As of January 2020, he is also the president of Division IV the of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) and member of the presiding board of SNF.

His research is in the area of interfacial transport phenomena, thermodynamics and related materials nanoengineering, with a host of related applications. The focus is on understanding the related physics, in particular at the micro- and nanoscales and employing this knowledge to the development of novel technologies. Specific current examples of application areas are the direct 2D and 3D printing of complex liquids and colloids with nanoscale feature size and resolution, the science-based design of supericephobic and omniphobic surfaces, the chip/transistor-level, bio-inspired 3D integrated cooling of supercomputer electronics, the development of facile methods based on plasmonics for sunlight management and the development of nanofluidic technologies and surface textures for biological applications under realistic fluidic environments (accelerated and guided cell adhesion, re-endothelialization, antifibrotic surface textures and materials, single virus trapping and transport).

Among the awards and recognitions he has received for his contributions are the White House/NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, the Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal in 1986, the Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Award in 1986, the University of Illinois Scholar Award in 1986 and the Reviewer of the Year Award for the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer in 1995. He is the recipient of the 2000 James Harry Potter Gold Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was a Russell S. Springer Professor of the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of California at Berkeley (2003) and the Hawkins Memorial Lecturer of Purdue University in 2004. He received the Heat Transfer Memorial Award for Science in 2003 from ASME. In 2008 he was a visiting Fellow at Oxford University and a distinguished visitor at the University of Tokyo.  He is the recipient of the 2009 Nusselt-Reynolds Prize of the World Assembly of Heat Transfer and Thermodynamics conferences (awarded every four years), for his scientific contributions. He is the 2012 recipient of the Max Jacob Award, for eminent scholarly achievement and distinguished leadership in the field of fluidics and heat transfer. Awarded annually to a scholar jointly by (ASME) and (AIChE), the Max Jacob Award is the highest honor in the field of thermofluidics these professional organizations bestow. He was presented with the Outstanding Engineering Alumnus Award of the University of Colorado in Boulder in 2012. He received the Dr.h.c. of the National Technical University of Athens in 2006. In 2008 he was elected to the Swiss National Academy of Engineering (SATW), where from 2012 to 2015 he also served as president of its science board.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Nathan Swami, University of Virginia, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:

Nathan Swami is a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. His group seeks to develop electrically functional microfluidic devices and instrumentation for label-free manipulation, sorting and cytometry of biosystems, for applications in biomolecular sensing, in vitro disease modeling and integrative tissue regeneration. Some of the chief enablers in his group include: (1) soft imprint lithography for 3D patterning of biodegradable scaffolds towards patterning cellular interactions for enabling tissue regeneration; (2) electrochemical analysis in microfluidic and droplet systems for biomolecular sensing; and (3) label-free impedance and deformability-based sorting and cytometry of biosystems. Prior to University of Virginia, he served on the scientific staff of the MEMS & Microfluidics group at Motorola Labs and prior to that, he served as a Scientist at Clinical Microsensors, Inc., a Caltech start-up interfacing microelectronics to bio-analysis. He seeks to impact emerging biomanufacturing approaches, as well as detection systems within point-of-care and resource-poor settings for personalizing medical decisions
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Assessment Matters

Roland Tormey

To develop assessment techniques which are valid and objective, notably to test if students have met the required learning outcomes.


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IMX Seminar Series - To be defined

Prof. Bert Meijer, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Kam Leong, Columbia University, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:


Bio:
Prof. Leong received a BS in chemical engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara and a PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Editor-in-Chief of Biomaterials
 
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Leveraging Labs for Learning

Siara Isaac

Explore ways to design lab experiments that help students develop a scientific approach which is transferable to real world complexity.


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Roll-Out EPFL Racing Team



The EPFL Racing Team, member of MAKE projects, is proud to present to you its new electric car which will take part to Formula Student competitions 2020. This second car is more performant, and we are glad to show you the technical pathway taken for the project through various interventions by partners and team members.
The presentation will be followed by an aperitif during which we’ll be happy to talk about the car conception more in details and answer any questions you might have.

Please, have a look at our social medias and our official website https://lausanneracingteam.ch/
 


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Yvonne Y. Chen, UCLA, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:
Yvonne earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology. She received postdoctoral training at the Center for Childhood Cancer Research within the Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and at the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School. Yvonne was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows prior to joining the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2013. Dr. Chen has been a recipient of the NIH Director’s Early Independence Award, the ACGT Young Investigator Award in Cell and Gene Therapy for Cancer, the NSF CAREER Award, the Mark Foundation Emerging Leader Award, and the Cancer Research Institute’s Lloyd J. Old STAR Award. Yvonne is also a Member Researcher in the Parker Institute for Cancer
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Towards elevated-temperature (>2 K) monolithic quantum computing processors in production FDSOI CMOS technology

Prof. Dr. Sorin Voinigescu
University of Toronto


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/682338354

Abstract: Universal quantum processors (QPs) “can now perform computations in a Hilbert space of dimension 253 ≈ 9 × 1015, beyond the reach of the fastest classical supercomputers available today.” Despite reaching this crucial milestone, they remain expensive, difficult-to-scale, room-size, laboratory devices that operate at extremely low temperature, require many hours of tweaking before use, and can only run simple quantum algorithms of limited practical use. Their core building block, the qubit, is based on exotic superconducting Josephson-junction technology and is controlled by racks of electronic equipment connected through long coaxial cables. For the next phase of QP development where real-world problems can be solved, solutions must be found to ensure QP (i) scalability to millions of qubits, (ii) high fidelity (accuracy), (iii) reliability, (iv) low-cost, low-variability, high-yield volume manufacturing, and (v) ease and speed of testability.
To address the scalability, reliability, and manufacturing challenges, we propose to use the minimum-size transistor of production CMOS technology as the quantum processor qubit. This was not possible in the past due to large transistor dimensions but has become feasible in 22nm (Fully-Depleted Silicon on Insulator) FDSOI CMOS. The prospect of cheap quantum information processing in “plain old CMOS” is potentially revolutionary, since most other alternative proposals require fairly exotic technologies that lack scalability, high yield, reliability and low variability, and are difficult to interface with classical processors. It takes advantage of the the natural progression of Moore's law to nanoscale dimensions and the transition from classical to quantum MOSFET behaviour.
This presentation will discuss the fundamental concepts and the feasibility of high-temperature (2-12 K) quantum processors, based on heterostructure Si1-xGex/Si1-yGey hole-spin qubits, monolithically integrated with control and readout electronics in commercial 22nm FDSOI CMOS technology. These temperatures, while still low, are 100 times higher than those of current competing quantum processors. Operation temperature is important because the QP is placed in a cryostat whose thermal lift (capacity to remove heat) increases exponentially with temperature.  Monolithic integration improves quantum processor fidelity, allows for scalability and ease of testability, reduces power consumption and cost, and improves manufacturability, yield and reliability.
The beneficial aspects of the SiGe channel hole-spin qubit will be emphasized in comparison with its silicon-only electron-spin counterpart. It will also be shown that, at 2-12 K, MOSFETs and cascodes can be operated as quantum dots in the subthreshold region, while behaving as classical MOSFETs and cascodes in the saturation region, suitable for qubits and mm-wave mixed-signal processing circuits, respectively.
Irrespective of the qubit technology, the development of large quantum processors is limited by the power consumption and associated heat dissipation of the analog-mixed-signal control and readout electronics and by the challenge of interconnecting such a large number of qubits with the control electronics. By developing elevated-temperature qubits, the heat dissipation constraints on the co-integrated or co-located control electronics and on the cryostat thermal lift are relieved, thus allowing for the integration of more complex quantum processors.
However, elevated-temperature qubits require higher-frequency spin control electronics, in the upper millimetre-wave and even THz frequency range. The design of low-power millimetre-wave spin manipulation electronic circuits will also be covered.  Finally, I will present measurements for full technology characterization at cryogenic temperatures up to 67 GHz and describe a methodology for cryogenic mm-wave control electronics design based on room-temperature transistor models.

Bio: Sorin P. Voinigescu is a Professor  in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Toronto where he holds the Stanley Ho Chair in Microelectronics and is the Director of the VLSI Research Group. He is an IEEE Fellow and an expert on millimeter-wave and 100+Gb/s integrated circuits and atomic-scale semiconductor device technologies. He obtained his  PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Toronto in 1994 and his  M.Sc Degree in Electronics and Telecommunications from the Politechnical Institute of Bucharest in 1984.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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BioE COLLOQUIA SERIES: Title to be advised

Prof. Karla Neugebauer, Yale School of Medicine, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)


Abstract:

Bio:
  • 2001 – 2013 Research Group Leader, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany
  • 1999-2001 Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA
  • 1998-1999 Staff Scientist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle WA
  • 1996-1997 Postdoc at EMBL in Heidelberg Germany
  • 1991-1996 Postdoc at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle WA

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Towards softer and more tissue-resembling elastomers

Prof. Dr. Anne Ladegaard Skov,
Technical University of Denmark, DTU


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/927149523

Abstract: Soft robotics put a demand forward for softer and softer materials with mechanical integrity and stability over time. Hydrogels are natural candidates with respect to the softness and to some extent with respect to the mechanical integrity, but over time, hydrogels change properties due to the change of water content. Silicone elastomers are the excellent for soft robotics due to their inherent softness, mechanical integrity and stability both with respect to temperature (between -100 and 300◦C) and deformation (mechanical stability for more than 100 mio cycles is not uncommon). However, silicone elastomers are challenged with demands of elastic moduli below ~500 kPa. Various network structures have been made to decrease the elastic moduli beyond the natural lower limit arising from the elastic response from entanglements. Amongst these structures are slide-ring elastomers, bottlebrush elastomers, and a completely novel type of elastomer where the origin of elasticity is currently not understood. The pros and cons of these network synthesis methods and the resulting properties will be discussed in this talk.

Bio: Anne Ladegaard Skov is a professor of polymer science and engineering specialising in design and utilization of silicone elastomers in the Danish Polymer Centre at Department of Chemical Engineering, DTU. She holds a PhD in polymer physics from DTU. She was a research fellow at Cambridge University, UK, before taking up a position as assistant professor at DTU. She has headed the Danish Polymer Centre sinde 2016. In 2018 she was promoted to full professor. She has worked with functionalisation and formulation of silicone elastomers with main focus on silicone elastomers used and optimised for dielectric elastomers and more recently for flexible electronics and drug delivery amongst others.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Donhee Ham

Prof. Dr. Donhee Ham,
Harvard University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/934241343

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Alard Mosk

Prof. Dr. Alard Mosk,
Utrecht University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/119888136

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Alberto Salleo

Prof. Dr. Alberto Salleo,
Stanford University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/843927942

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenbrunner

Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenbrunner
Johannes Kepler University Linz


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream:

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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