Upcoming Seminars and Events

Demand Response Operation of Chemical Plants: Models and Computational Methods

Prof. Michael Baldea. Associate Professor and Frank A. Liddell, Jr. Centennial Fellow in the McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, and a core faculty member in the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at The University of Texas at Austin.

Abstract: deregulation and dynamic market conditions have created significant opportunities for the engagement of industrial entities normally regarded as electricity consumers in the operation of the power grid. Chemical plants (e.g., air separation, ammonia production, chlor-alkali) are particularly promising candidates given their large power demand. Engaging in such activities (either demand response or providing ancillary services) calls for a close coordination between business (planning, scheduling) and process control decisions of a chemical plant. The integration of  business decisions with dynamic information from the control layer is a difficult task owing to the broad range of time scales involved in making the respective decisions, and the corresponding need to balance long-term prediction with real-time execution. In this presentation, I will focus on recent developments that allow for a closer coordination between production scheduling and supervisory control systems. I will introduce a new modeling framework, based on capturing the input-output behavior of the chemical process and its control system (whether multi-loop or MPC) in a low-dimensional model, which is then used in scheduling calculations. I will discuss ways to exploit historical process operating data (which are available in most plants, practically “for free”) in building such models. I will also show that the integrated scheduling-control problem can be cast as a mixed integer linear program that can be solved efficiently for problems of practical interest. An industry-based case study concerning the demand-response operation of an air separation plant will be discussed, along with other industrial applications.

The seminar can also be followed remotely by joining the online Zoom meeting (connection possible 15 minutes before the talk).
In case of problem, you can contact our IT support (37679 - it.vs@epfl.ch )

 
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MEchanics GAthering -MEGA- Seminar: PZE-transduced suspended microchannel resonators for biosensing

Annalisa De PastinaNEMS, EPFL

Abstract Micro- and Nano- mechanical biosensors are mechanical transducers with micro- and nano- sized moving parts, which have demonstrated outstanding sensing capabilities down to single molecules. Even though well-established electrical and optical sensors still dominate the market of biological detection, in the past two decades Micro- and Nano- ElectroMechanical systems (M/NEMS) have been receiving a lot of attention at the research level. The main reason for the development of M/NEMS in life-science applications is the need to address the mechanical nature of many fundamental biological processes. In fact, cell mechanical properties such as stiffness or viscoelasticity, represent a valid diagnostic biomarker for several pathologies like cancer, malaria and sickle cell anemia, among others.
This talk will focus on piezoelectric suspended microchannel resonators (SMRs), which are hollow resonant devices with embedded microfluidic channels and integrated piezoelectric transduction. The device development, from preliminary design considerations until real-time analysis of single cells will be discussed, also providing an insight on SMRs microfabrication and integration in a complex experimental setup.
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PEE104: Surface Mount Reflow Technique and Debugging

Raffael Tschui from Octanis Instruments, Electrical Engineer MSc EPFL.

This is a hands-on workshop teaching you everything you need to know to perform professional PCB assembly.

Optional: Bring your own PCB, components and stencil, if you already have one!

After the official part, you can stay here and continue working on your own board. We will be here to help you (20:00 - 22:00)

Learning Objectives
- Tools and material needed for SMD assembly
- Applying solder paste
- Manual placement of components
- Automatic pick and place machine
- Reflow soldering
- PCB rework and debugging.


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mTOR and Lysosomes in Growth Control

Prof. David Sabatini, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
Our lab is interested in the regulation of growth and metabolism by nutrients and for some time we have focused on the mTOR pathway, particularly the nutrient-sensing network anchored by mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1). I will discuss our latest work on how mTORC1 senses cytosolic and lysosomal amino acids and the role selective autophagy plays. I will highlight our use of a method we developed to profile the metabolite and protein content of organelles to identify proteins that move on and off lysosomes in response to nutrient conditions. I also may present our use of somatic cell genetics to identify new components of metabolic pathways, particularly in mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism.

 
Bio:
David M. Sabatini is an American scientist and Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. He has been an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2008 and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016. He is known for his important contributions in the areas of cell signaling and cancer metabolism, most notably the discovery and study of mTOR, a protein kinase that is an important regulator of cell and organismal growth that is deregulated in cancer, diabetes, as well as the aging process.

Education:
MD/PhD 1997, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Research Summary:
We probe the basic mechanisms that regulate growth — the process whereby cells and organisms accumulate mass and increase in size. The pathways that control growth are often hindered in human diseases like diabetes and cancer. Our long-term goals are to identify and characterize these mechanisms, and to understand their roles in normal and diseased mammals.


Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/157047466
 
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3D Morphological Characterization of Complex Soft Matter Assemblies at the Sub-Unit Cell Level

Prof. Erwin Thomas, Thomas Research Group, Rice University Houston USA

The double gyroid (DG) microdomain structure is a complex 3D tubular network structure found in block copolymers as well as in butterfly wings and amphiphilic phases.   We employ a slice and view electron microscopy technique to directly generate a 3D tomogram of the DG nanoscale structure.  The material studied is a polystyrene (PS) – polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) diblock copolymer that exhibits the DG network morphology with a lattice parameter of ~ 130nm, with feature sizes on the 20 nm scale, typical of many soft matter assemblies.   By alternating between a thin ion beam slice and a secondary electron image using a low voltage incident electron beam, the voxel size is approximately 3 x 3 x 3 nm3 allowing analysis of a comprehensive set of sub-unit cell morphological descriptors and enabling critical comparison to theoretical models of the structure.  We find that the PS-PDMS material does not exhibit cubic symmetry, but rather a range of triclinic shapes, most likely due to distortions of the structure from solvent induced shrinkage during film preparation.  Analysis of the triclinic unit cell determines the magnitudes and directions of the shear and tensile deformations that can be re-expressed as an eigen-matrix of principal compressive/tensile strains (average compressive strain of ~ -20% and tensile strain about + 20%).  Morphological characteristics are analyzed including direct measures of the distributions of the distances between the interface between the two blocks and the skeletal graph and the distance between the interface and the triply periodic gyroid minimal surface, the mean and Gaussian curvatures of the interface, the dihedral angle between adjacent nodes, as well as the node-node strut lengths and directions. These very detailed experimental measures are compared with self consistent field theory calculations of a PS-PDMS melt undergoing the ODT under boundary conditions that are matched to the deformed cubic (i.e. triclinic) unit cell.
 
References:
 
Prasad, I., Jinnai, H., Ho, R-M., Thomas, E. L. and Grason, G. “Anatomy of triply-periodic network assemblies:  Characterizing skeletal and inter-domain surface geometry of block copolymer gyroids,” Soft Matter, 14, 3612-3623 (2018).
 
X. Feng, H. Guo and E. L. Thomas, “Topological Defects in Tubular Network Block Copolymers,” Polymer, (2019) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polymer.2019.01.085

Bio:
Edwin L. “Ned” Thomas served as William and Stephanie Sick Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering at Rice from 2011 to 2017. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Materials Science and NanoEngineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and collaborates with scientists and engineers in the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology at Rice.
 
Thomas is a materials scientist and mechanical engineer and is passionate about promoting engineering leadership and student design competitions. His research is currently focused on using 2D and 3D lithography, direct-write and self-assembly techniques for creating metamaterials with unprecedented mechanical and thermal properties.
 
Thomas is the former head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a position he held from 2006 until his appointment at Rice in July 2011. He was named Morris Cohen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in 1989 and is the founder and former director of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology (2002-2006).
 
Before joining MIT in 1988, Thomas founded and served as co-director of the Institute for Interface Science and was head of the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Massachusetts. He is a recipient of the 1991 High Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society and the 1985 American Chemical Society Creative Polymer Chemist award. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009, Inaugural Fellow of the Materials Society in 2008, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2003 and Fellow of the American Physical Society in 1986. He wrote the undergraduate textbook, The Structure of Materials, and has coauthored more than 450 papers and holds 20 patents.
 
Thomas received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts and his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Cornell University.

 


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Testing General Relativity with Gravitational Waves

Prof. Vitor Cardoso, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon

This year marks the centenary of a pivotal breakthrough: the confirmation that gravity can be described as spacetime curvature. Among the most outrageous predictions of the theory are the existence of black holes and gravitational waves.

Gravitational waves offer a unique glimpse into the unseen universe in different ways, and allow us to test the basic tenets of General Relativity, some of which have been taken for granted without observations: are gravitons massless? Are black holes the simplest possible macroscopic objects? do event horizons and black holes really exist, or is their formation halted by some as-yet unknown mechanism? Do singularities arise in our universe as the outcome of violent collisions? Can gravitational waves carry information about the nature of the elusive dark matter?

In this talk, I will describe the science encoded in a gravitational wave signal and what the upcoming years might have in store regarding fundamental physics and gravitational waves


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IGM Colloquium: The onset of turbulence in shear flows - a matter of life and death

Prof. Björn Hof, IST Austria

Abstract:
Past studies of the transition to turbulence in pipes and related shear flows could neither agree on a critical point nor on the nature of the transition. The main difficulty is that in this class of flows turbulence arises despite the linear stability of the laminar flow and that it results from perturbations of finite amplitude. I will show that under such circumstances the transition is driven by a stochastic spreading process: each turbulent spot will eventually die but it may produce offspring beforehand. This setting precisely corresponds to the rules of a stochastic process called ‘directed percolation’. By introducing periodic boundary conditions in laboratory experiments we demonstrate for Couette and pipe flow that the transition to turbulence indeed falls into the directed percolation universality class. In particular I will also show that insights into the transition process can be exploited to control turbulence. Moreover, if time permits, I will discuss how the transitional regime can be connected to high Reynolds number turbulence.

Bio:
Björn Hof is professor of experimental physics at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria in Klosterneuburg, Austria. He obtained his PhD in physics at the University of Manchester, UK in 2001. After postdocs in Manchester and the TU Delft he was a lecturer in the Physics Department in Manchester and later a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen, Germany. He joined IST Austria in 2013. His main research interests are the transition to turbulence, turbulence control and instabilities in complex fluids.
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APIX: NEMS-based gas chromatograph

Eric Colinet, R&D manager, APIX analytics, Grenoble, France

Abstract: Apix-Analytics, the leader in Nano-Sensor (NEMS) based gas chromatography (GC) system is a start-up company from CEA-LETI and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) founded in December 2011. The presentation will present why NEMS resonators offer a unique breakthrough technology in the GC field and will discuss how the key challenges such as industrialization, multi scale system integration combining mechanical, chemical and electronic sub-systems are addressed.

Bio: Eric Colinet graduated from INSA-Lyon France in 2002 and received a PhD from SUPELEC PARIS in 2005 and a HDR from INP- GRENOBLE in 2010. In 2011, he cofounded Apix-Analytics, a start-up company from CEA-LETI/CALTECH specialized in Nano-Sensor based gas analysis systems, where he is now managing the research and development activities. His field of expertise covers micro & nano electromechanical systems (MEMS-NEMS), sensors & actuators, control theory & signal processing, solid-state electronics & IC, MEMS-CMOS Integration. He is the author of more than 100 scientific papers and holds over 20 patents.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.

Apix Analytics - Company Website


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Animal Exploitation and Sustainability: a talk by Seb Alex



85.000 animals are killed every second for food, clothing, medicine and many other industries.
Exactly how much of this is necessary? What are the ethical arguments for and against? What do we as a society think and feel about it? How does it affect the environment and how can we move forward from here?

Join us on April 30, at 6:30pm in Internef 273 auditorium (Université de Lausanne) to find out more. A free buffet will be served after the talk.

Born and raised in Lebanon, Seb Alex moved to Europe in 2011 to pursue his career in Sustainable Architecture. Having worked with the UNHCR’s refugee program for a year, then took the opportunity to enter the corporate world and work as an international coordinator of projects for an architecture company in Barcelona.

A year after, he decided to leave his corporate life behind and dedicate all his time to what really speaks to his heart: animal rights advocacy. 

During 2018, he gave talks on Vegan Advocacy, Why Veganism, Why Activism and Learning From Previous Struggles to over 950+ people across Europe (such as but not limited to: Germany, Sweden, Turkey, Poland, Switzerland) and Australia.

He is now returning to Europe present his talk on Animal Exploitation and Sustainability.

Seb Alex on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seb.alex
Seb Alex on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/sebalex


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Valais/Wallis AI Workshop 5th edition - INTERPRETING MACHINE LEARNING



Machine learning has become an integral part of many fields of research and has achieved considerable success. Despite continued advancements made, it is not always explainable: (a) what information is the machine learning from the data? and (b) how is the machine making the decisions? The 5th edition of Valais/Wallis AI workshop focuses on these questions by engaging researchers from various fields through presentations and discussions.


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The Science of Science: What makes science effective?

Prof. James A. Evans, University of Chicago

The College of Management of Technology, in collaboration with IC, is launching a new EPFL Seminar series on “Computational Social Sciences & Economics.” The seminar will bring in leading guest speakers to examine questions that are of great importance for EPFL and society more broadly.
 
Our first high-level guest speaker will be Prof. James A. Evans, from the University of Chicago. His research on the Science of Science provides insights into the conditions that drive creativity and the genesis of scientific breakthroughs.  Ultimately, these insights help to develop tools and policies with the potential to accelerate discoveries and advance science.
 
His research, published in Science and Nature, has analyzed more than 110 million articles, patents, and software packages from 1954 to 2016, and examined questions related to collaboration, team composition, and scientific impact factor. His results shed light on how to balance the demands of multi-expert teams with goals of fostering innovative, breakthrough results.
 
Professor Evans’ research is of major interest for all researchers across EPFL seeking to have greater scientific impact and meaningful results.  We warmly encourage you to come to the opening talk for the seminar series on May 3rd.
 
Hosts:


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CESS Seminar: An MINLP and a continuous-optimization approaches for aircraft conflict avoidance via speed and heading angle deviations

Prof. Marcel Mongeau, Professor in Operations Research at ENAC (École Nationale de l'Aviation Civile) in Toulouse, France

Abstract:
We propose two approaches to address a challenging problem arising in Air Traffic Management, that of keeping at all times a distance between any pair of aircraft throughout their flight trajectory above a threshold value. We address the problem by adjusting both aircraft speeds and heading angles simultaneously. Both the mixed-integer nonlinear programming model and the penalty continuous optimization model we are introducing deal with the complex aircraft separation constraints through reformulations. Numerical results validate the proposed approaches.

Bio:
Marcel Mongeau received his BSc (1985) and MSc (1987) degrees in Mathematics from Universite de Montreal, and his PhD (1991) in Combinatorics & Optimization from the University of Waterloo (Canada). He was then a post-doctoral researcher at CRM (Universite de Montreal), at INRIA (France) and at the University of Edinburgh. From 1994 to 2011, he was at IMT, Universite Paul Sabatier (France), where he received a Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches in 2003. He is currently Professor in Operations Research at ENAC in Toulouse (France). His research interests include Global Optimization, Numerical Optimization, and Operations Research with applications to aeronautics.

 
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EE Distinguished Lecturer Seminar: Internet of Things — The Quest for Trust

Lothar Thiele was born in Aachen, Germany on April 7, 1957. He received his Diplom-Ingenieur and Dr.-Ing. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Technical University of Munich in 1981 and 1985 respectively. After completing his Habilitation thesis from the Institute of Network Theory and Circuit Design of the Technical University Munich, he joined the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University in 1987. In 1988, he took up the chair of microelectronics at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Saarland, Saarbrucken, Germany. He joined ETH Zurich, Switzerland, as a full Professor of Computer Engineering, in 1994. His research interests include models, methods and software tools for the design of embedded systems, internet of things, cyberphysical systems, sensor networks, embedded software and bioinspired optimization techniques. Lothar Thiele is associate editor of INTEGRATION - the VLSI Journal, Journal of Signal Processing Systems, IEEE Transaction on Industrial Informatics, Journal of Systems Architecture, IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation, Journal of Real-Time Systems, ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, ACM Transactions on Cyberphysical Systems, and ACM Transaction on Internet of Things. In 1986 he received the "Dissertation Award" of the Technical University of Munich, in 1987, the "Outstanding Young Author Award" of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society, in 1988, the Browder J. Thompson Memorial Award of the IEEE, and in 2000-2001, the "IBM Faculty Partnership Award". In 2004, he joined the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. In 2005, he was the recipient of the Honorary Blaise Pascal Chair of University Leiden, The Netherlands. Since 2009 he is a member of the Foundation Board of Hasler Foundation, Switzerland. Since 2010, he is a member of the Academia Europaea. In 2013, he joined the National Research Council of the Swiss National Science Foundation. 

Abstract: If visions and forecasts of industry come true then we will be soonsurrounded by billions of interconnected embedded devices. We willinteract with them in a cyber-human symbiosis, they will not onlyobserve us but also our environment, and they will be part of manyvisible and ubiquitous objects around us. We have the legitimateexpectation that the individual devices as well as the overallsystem behaves in a reliable, predictable and trustworthy manner.
 
Besides, there are many application domains where we rely on acorrect and fault-free system behavior. We expect trustworthyresults from sensing, computation, communication and actuation dueto economic importance or even catastrophic consequences if theoverall system is not working correctly, e.g., in industrialautomation, distributed control of energy systems, surveillance,medical applications, or early warning scenarios in the context ofbuilding safety or environmental catastrophes. Finally,trustworthiness and reliability are mandatory for the societalacceptance of human-cyber interaction and cooperation.
 
It will be argued that we need novel architectural concepts, anassociated design process and validations strategies to satisfy thestrongly conflicting requirements and associated design challengesof platforms for the Internet of Things: Handle at the same timelimited available resources, adaptive run-time behavior, andpredictability. These challenges concern all components andfunctions of an IoT system, e.g., information extraction fromglobal data, local decision making, computation, storage, wirelesscommunication, energy management, energy harvesting, sensors,sensor interfaces, and actuation. The focus of the presentation ison new models and methods as well as examples from various fieldsin environmental monitoring.
 
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A New Flexible Photoplethysmography (PPG) Sensor Patch for Continuous Measurement of Blood Flow Volume and Pressure based on AI algorithms

Prof. Dr. Paul Chao
National Chiao Tung University Taiwan

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/997034286

Abstract: A new flexible hotoplethysmography (PPG) sensor patch measuring blood-flow volume (BFV) and blood pressure (BP) based on AI algorithms is successfully designed and prototyped. With this patch, the measurement on BFV and BP is non-invasively, and can be continuously collected over more than 24 hours, resulting in valuable long-time monitoring data for medical diagnosis. These long-time, continuous BVF measurements are particularly important for monitoring the quality of an arteriovenous fistula of a hemodialysis patient for prognosis. As opposed to the developed patch, an expensive and bulky BFV monitor is commonly adopted in clinic practice as a gold standard for BFV measurement once per months. The instrument needs to be operated by professional, well-trained medical personnel. The PPG sensor patch developed is instead a low-cost, small-sized, wearable, and easy-to-use sensor that is capable of continuously measuring BFV and BP via AI algorithm. New designs of front-end analog circuit, signal processing, and an intelligent neural network calibration method are employed to achieve high correlations of R2 = 0.88 for BFV and R2 = 0.85 for BP, as opposed to their gold standard counterpart monitors.

Bio: Dr. Paul C.-P. Chao received his Ph.D. degree from Michigan State University, USA, and then with Chrysler Corp in Auburn Hill, Detroit, USA before joined National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Taiwan. He is currently University Distinguished Professor of the electrical engineering department at NCTU, and Distinguished Lecturer for IEEE Sensors Council, 2018 – 2010. His research interests focus on sensors, actuators and their interface circuitry. Dr. Chao has published more than 280 peer-reviewed papers (books, journal papers, conferences, reports) and 38 patents.
Dr. Chao was the recipient of the 1999 Arch T. Colwell Merit Award from Society of Automotive Engineering, Detroit, USA; the 2004 Long-Wen Tsai Best Paper Award from National Society of Machine Theory and Mechanism, Taiwan; the 2005 Best Paper Award from National Society of Engineers, Taiwan; the 2007 Acer Long-Term Award; the 2009 Best Paper Award from the Symposium on Nano-Device Technology; the 2010/2014 Best Paper Award from the Annual ASME Conference on Information Storage and Processing Systems (ISPS); the second most downloaded paper in IEEE Sensors Journal in 2011; the Best Poster Paper award of IDMC 2015; the prestigious Outstanding Research Award from National Association of Automatic Control in Taiwan in 2015; the prestigious National Innovation Award of Taiwan government 2016; The 2017 Best Industrial Project Award by Ministry of Science and technology, Taiwan government; The 2017 Presidential Outstanding Professor of Engineering in Nation (Taiwan) (awarded by the president of the nation in the Presidential House of Taiwan, ROC); Two 2017 Future Technology Awards (Taiwan Oscar Invention Award) from Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Taiwan Government; The 2018 Outstanding Professor of Electrical Engineering in Nation (Taiwan), National Association of Electrical Engineering, Taiwan; The second National Innovation Award of Taiwan Government in 2018.
Dr. Chao has served as University Associate Vice Presidents of NCTU for academic affairs (2009-2010) and research and development (2015); the Secretary General, IEEE Taipei Section, 2009-2010; the founding chair of Taipei chapter for the IEEE Sensor Council; Member-at-Large for IEEE Sensors Council, 2012-2014. Dr. Chao received major IEEE awards for this service: The IEEE Large Section Award from IEEE Head Quarter for the outstanding service as the Secretary for 2009-2010, and The IEEE MGA Award from IEEE Region 10 for outstanding service as the Secretary for IEEE Taipei Section, 2009-2010. He was the General Chair of the 2016 ASME ISPS and IoT conference in Santa Clara, CA, USA; chairs and co-chairs of major conferences. For editorial services, he is currently Topical Editors of IEEE Sensors Journal and IEEE IoT Journal. He was the Associate Editors of ASME Journal of Vibration and Acoustics and Journal of Circuit, System and Computer; guest editors of special journal issues. Dr. Chao received the award of the 2017 Best Topical Editor, Runner up, IEEE Sensors Journal. He is a senior member of IEEE and ASME Fellow.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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title to be announced

Prof. Cheng Zhu, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Hybrid Additive Manufacturing of metal parts with 3D control of internal stresses and microstructures

Prof. Roland Logé, Laboratory of Thermomechanical Metallurgy, EPFL

A new hybrid additive manufacturing process is introduced, combining Laser Shock Peening (LSP) with Selective Laser Melting (SLM), and called 3D LSP. LSP is a well-known surface treatment introducing plastic deformation and Compressive Residual Stresses (CRS) over a certain penetration depth into the material. By repeatedly applying LSP during the part fabrication, 3D LSP can efficiently strain harden a metal and convert SLM induced Tensile Residual Stresses (TRS) into CRS, in the bulk of the part. This strategy opens a range of new possibilities such as increased fatigue life or geometrical accuracy, 3D design of grain structures, and improved processability. Examples are provided for each of these effects, looking at fatigue life and grain structure design of 316L steel samples, geometrical accuracy of Ti-6Al-4V samples, and processability of a Ni-based superalloy. In the latter case, 3D LSP brings a new efficient crack healing mechanism.   ·        References :   -        N. Kalentics, E. Boillat, P. Peyre, S. Ćirić-Kostić, N. Bogojević, R.E. Logé (2017), “Tailoring residual stress profile of Selective Laser Melted parts by Laser Shock Peening”, Additive Manufacturing 16, 90-97. -        N. Kalentics, E. Boillat, P. Peyre, C. Gorny, C. Kenel, C. Leinenbach, J. Jhabvala, R. E. Logé (2017), 3D Laser Shock Peening – a new method for the 3D control of residual stresses in Selective Laser Melting, Materials & Design 130, 350–356. -        N. Kalentics, A. Burn, M. Cloots and R.E. Logé (2018), “3D laser shock peening as a way to improve geometrical accuracy in selective laser melting“, Int. J. Advanced Manufacturing Technology, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-018-3033-3. -        N. Kalentics, K. Huang, M. Ortega Varela de Seijas, A. Burn, V. Romano and R.E. Logé (2019), “Laser shock peening: A promising tool for tailoring metallic microstructures in selective laser melting”, J. Materials Processing Tech. 266, 612–618.

Bio: Roland Logé is an associate professor at EPFL, with a primary affiliation to the Materials Institute, and a secondary affiliation to the Microengineering Institute. He is the head of the Laboratory of Thermomechanical Metallurgy, and active in the field of processing of metals and alloys in the solid state, focusing on the ability to tailor microstructures, and the associated material properties. Thermal and mechanical paths and the resulting microstructures are analyzed and simulated both experimentally and numerically. While most of the activities were so far related to recrystallization, precipitation, grain growth, textures and grain boundary engineering,  extensions of the microstructure design approach progressively include phase transformations, internal stresses and cracking phenomena, with applications to bulk metal forming and additive manufacturing.


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EPFL - MicroNanoFabrication Annual Review Meeting

This event presents research achievements of the past year and encourage interaction among professors, researchers, students, and industry partners. For this 20th edition, 10 invited speakers will be present and 219 posters will be presented. 

The scope of the forum is Micro & Nano Fabrication Techniques used in the following fields:
 
- Micro and Nanoelectronics (Soft Bioelectronic, 3D Integration, Nanowires, High-Q Resonators, New materials, ...)
- Biomedical Applications (Microfluidics, Microelectrodes, Lab on a Chip, Probes, Neuroprosthetics,  ...)
- MEMS, NEMS (Sensors and Actuators, Motors, Tweezers,  Artificial  Muscles, Micro and Nanomechanics, ...) 
- Optics (Nanophotonics, Optomechanics, Photonic Crystals, MOEMS, Optofluidics, Fibers, ...)
- Nanostructure Physics (VCSELs, Quantum Opto-Electronics, III/V Devices, Nanotubes, Nanowires, Nanomechanics, ...)
- Material Sciences (Photovoltaic Materials, Piezoelectric materials, Nanoparticles, Energy Harvesting, Micro Fuel Cells, ...)
- Fabrication Technologies (Lithography, Etching, Thin Films, ALD, EBEAM, CMP, Self assembly, Inkjet Printing, PDMS, ...)
- Metrology and Defect Analysis (SEM, FIB, Ellipsometry, Reflectometry, AFM, EDX, Stress, Conductivity, ...)
- Packaging and Assembly (Grinding, Wire Bonding, Encapsulation, ...)

Click here for the full program
Click here for the list of posters

Registration is mandatory, by sending an email to secretaries.cmi@epfl.ch, including your name and first name, organization and email address.


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Repurposing Ribosomes for Synthetic Biology

Prof. Michael Jewett, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (USA)

BIOENGINEERING SEMINAR

Abstract:
Imagine a world in which we could adapt biology to manufacture any therapeutic, material, or chemical from renewable resources, both quickly and on demand. Industrial biotechnology is one of the most attractive approaches for addressing this need, particularly when large-scale chemical synthesis is untenable. Unfortunately, current approaches to engineering organisms remain costly and slow. This is because cells themselves impose limitations on biobased product synthesis. It is difficult to balance intracellular fluxes to optimally satisfy a very active synthetic pathway while the machinery of the cell is functioning to maintain reproductive viability. Further, chemical reactions take place behind a selective barrier, the cell wall, which limits sample acquisition, monitoring, and direct control. In addition, cells are adapted to a relatively simple chemical operating system (i.e., a few common sugars, 20 amino acids), which presents researchers a limited set of accessible molecules with which to work. In this presentation, I will discuss my group's efforts to overcome these limitations and widen the aperture of the traditional model of biotechnology.  In one direction, we seek to create a new paradigm for engineering biocatalytic systems using cell-free biology. In another area, we are catalyzing new directions to repurpose the translation apparatus for synthetic biology. Our new paradigms for biochemical engineering are enabling a deeper understanding of why nature’s designs work the way they do, as well as opening the way to novel biobased products that have been impractical, if not impossible, to produce by other means. 

Bio:
Michael Jewett is the Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence, a Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and co-director of the Center for Synthetic Biology at Northwestern University. He is also an Institute Fellow at the Northwestern Argonne Institute for Science & Engineering. Dr. Jewett’s lab seeks to re-conceptualize the way we engineer complex biological systems for compelling applications in medicine, materials, and energy by transforming biochemical engineering with synthetic biology. Dr. Jewett is the recipient of the NIH Pathway to Independence Award in 2009, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering in 2011, the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2011, the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2011, the 3M non-tenured faculty grant in 2012, the Camille-Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award in 2015, the ACS Biochemical Technologies Division Young Investigator Award in 2017, and the Biochemical Engineering Young Investigator Award in 2018. He received his PhD in 2005 at Stanford University and completed postdoctoral studies at the Center for Microbial Biotechnology in Denmark and the Harvard Medical School.
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Towards Platinum-Free Fuel Cells for Affordable Zero-Emission Cars

Prof. Yushan YAN
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,
University of Delaware, USA

ChE-605 - Highlights in Energy Research seminar series
One of the grand challenges facing humanity today is the development of an alternative energy system that is safe, clean, and sustainable. A distributed renewable electrochemical energy and mobility system (DREEMS) can meet this challenge. At the foundation of this new energy system, we have chosen to study fuel cells, electrolyzers, and flow batteries. For all these devices polymer electrolytes and electrocatalysis play a critical role in controlling their performance, cost, and durability, and thus their economic viability. In this presentation, I will focus on our recent work on hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs) for which we have developed inexpensive hydrocarbon polymer membranes and nonprecious metal catalysts. More specifically I will show the roadmap we have developed for this technology, the progress we have made in developing the most stable membranes and the most active nonprecious metal catalysts. I will also try to answer the fundamental question: why are hydrogen oxidation reactions are slower in base than in acid for precious metal catalysts?
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CESS Seminar: Earthquake vulnerability assessment of soil - foundation - structure systems

Prof. Dimitris Pitilakis, Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Abstract
Earthquake vulnerability is a major contributor to seismic risk, while vulnerability assessment is an essential tool for the identification and mitigation of earthquake losses. Over the last years, significant research work has been made towards the development of a comprehensive methodology regarding the estimation of the expected earthquake losses and the resilience of man-made structures, while researchers have developed analytical, empirical, judgment-based and hybrid fragility curves covering a wide variety of structural typologies. To date, fragility curves are derived assuming fixed-base conditions, ignoring soil-structure interaction (SSI) and local site effects, yet these effects may play either a beneficial or a detrimental role to the seismic response of the structures. In this context, the influence of (i) SSI and (ii) nonlinear soil behavior on earthquake vulnerability assessment of structures needs further investigation. This lecture is built upon this scientific shortage, discussing efficient approaches to tackle the ever-emerging problem of the earthquake vulnerability assessment of civil engineering soil - foundation - structure systems.

Bio
Dimitris Pitilakis is Associate Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (M.Sc. University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D. in earthquake engineering from Ecole Centrale Paris, France). He is an expert in geotechnical earthquake engineering, with emphasis on soil – foundation – structure interaction, dynamics of foundations and performance-based design. Lately, he has been working on the earthquake vulnerability assessment of soil-foundation-structure systems, in local and in city scale. He is a member of national and international scientific societies on Earthquake Engineering and reviewer of international scientific journals. He has developed software for the simulation of the soil- foundation- structure interaction, with emphasis on nonlinear soil behavior, as well as software for foundation design and analysis. He has significant experience in experimental soil-foundation-structure interaction in small-scale (shaking table and centrifuge) and full-scale (EuroProteas in Euroseistest http://euroseisdb.civil.auth.gr/sfsis) facilities. He is currently in charge of the shaking table facility of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, and of the full-scale EuroProteas facility.
 
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Summer school: Shaping the future of (bio)Medicine 2019



The future of biomedical research will most certainly consist of the integration of molecular biology, bioengineering, and computational biology into healthcare in a coherent and seamless effort to generate new technologies and therapies for patients. PhD and MD-PhD students involved in research oriented towards translational applications will play an essential role not only in increasing knowledge and developing new technologies but also in coordinating highly collaborative and interconnected initiatives.
In this summer school, we will explore a number of topics that we believe will provide a broad overview of the challenges that life science research and its translational opportunities are and will be facing in the next decades. Furthermore, by promoting and encouraging interdisciplinary discussions we hope to emphasize how impelling is the need for collaboration among different fields to make the bridge between research and its application to healthcare.


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title to be announced

Prof. Gilad Haran, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (IL)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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From a Moore’s Law for Fibers To Fabrics as a Service

Prof. Yoel Fink, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT USA

Fibers and fabrics are among the earliest forms of human expression, and yet they haven’t changed much from a functional standpoint over the entire course of human experience. Recently, a new family of fibers composed of conductors, semiconductors and insulators has emerged. These fibers can achieve device attributes, yet are fabricated using scalable preform-based fiber-processing methods, yielding kilometers of functional fiber devices. Moreover, it is expected that the functions of fibers will increase dramatically over the next years creating a fiber equivalent of the “Moore’s law”. In this talk I will describe the underlying context for this “law” and discuss paths to achieving system level behavior on the fabric level. I will also outline progress to date in AFFOA, a US based advanced fabric non-profit dedicated to transforming traditional fibers, yarns, and fabrics into highly sophisticated, integrated and networked devices and systems that will see, hear, sense and communicate, store and convert energy, and change color heralding the transition of fabrics from a goods based industry to one that provides value added services.
 
Bio: Yoel Fink is Professor of Materials Science and Electrical Engineering at MIT. His research group has pioneered the field of multimaterial multifunctional fiber devices, and is focused on extending the frontiers of fiber materials to encompass electronic, optoelectronic and even acoustic properties for textile and composite applications.
 
Yoel is also the CEO of AFFOA (Advanced Functional Fabrics of America) and former Director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). RLE is MIT’s first interdisciplinary lab, with over 700 researchers and $60M a year budget.
 
Professor Fink holds a B.A. in Physics and a B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from the Technion, and a PhD from MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering. He is the recipient of multiple awards, among them the National Academies Initiatives in Research (2004), the MacVicar Fellowship (2007) for outstanding teaching and the Collier Medal (2016). Professor Fink is a co-founder of OmniGuide Inc. (2000) and served as its chief executive officer from 2007–2010. He presided over its commercial launch, established an 80% gross margin business and grew it to $20M. He is the coauthor of over ninety scientific journal articles and holds over fifty issued U.S. patents on multimaterial fibers and devices. As RLE Director, he initiated the Translational Fellows Program, a postdoc initiative that facilitates research-derived ventures, and the Low Cost Renovation effort.
 


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Workshop on State-of-the-Art Technologies for Protein Sciences



SV core facilities are happy to announce a workshop on State-of-the-Art Technologies for Protein Sciences
 
TOPICS include:
Protein Production (mammalian, insect and bacterial cells): David Hacker
Protein Purification: David Hacker
Mass Spectrometry: Adrian Schmid
Biophysical  Techniques (ITC, SPR, CD and Thermal shift): Kelvin Lau
Crystallography: Florence Pojer
Bio-NMR: Luciano Abriata
Cryo-EM: Davide Demurtas and Sergey Nazarov
 
We will be there to answer your questions and discuss your projects.

At the end of the workshop, you will have the opportunity to sign up for practical sessions.
 
Coffee & Croissants will be served.
 
We look forward to seeing you on the 14th of May.


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IGM Colloquium: Mechanobiology of epithelial growth and folding

Prof. Xavier Trepat, Institute of Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC)

Abstract:
Biological processes such as morphogenesis, tissue regeneration, and cancer invasion are driven by collective migration, division, and folding of epithelial tissues. Each of these functions is tightly regulated by mechanochemical networks and ultimately driven by physical forces. I will present maps of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) forces during cell migration and division in a variety of epithelial models, from the expanding MDCK cluster to the regenerating zebrafish epicardium. These maps revealed that migration and division in growing tissues are jointly regulated. I will also present direct measurements of epithelial traction, tension, and luminal pressure in three-dimensional epithelia of controlled size and shape. By examining epithelial tension over time-scales of hours and for nominal strains reaching 1000%, we establish a remarkable degree of tensional homeostasis mediated by superelastic behavior.

Bio:
Xavier Trepat received a BSc in Physics in 2000 and a BSc in Engineering in 2001. In 2004 he obtained his PhD from the Medical School at the University of Barcelona. He then joined the Program in Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences at Harvard University as a postdoctoral researcher. In 2008 he became a "Ramón y Cajal" researcher at the University of Barcelona and in January 2011 an ICREA Research Professor at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC). He is Group Leader of the Integrative Cell and Tissue Dynamics research line at IBEC. In 2015 he won the Banc de Sabadell Award for Biomedical Research.
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Packaging and Hybridization: the Valorization of MEMS Technologies

Dr. Michel Despont

Abstract: The integration of microsystems and, in particular, of MEMS devices continues to be a key element of many high technology application areas. If the devices themselves are crucial elements for innovation, their integration in a complete microsystem are essential for their successful commercialization. Hence development of 3D integration and packaging technologies are of the upmost importance. At CSEM we develop new solutions for wafer level hybridization and packaging solutions to respond to the demand of the industry active in microsystem technology. An overview of the packaging and hybridization technology will be presented along with some concrete examples such are biocompatible hermetic packaging for active implant, wafer level gas cell for atomic clock, wafer level hybridization for complex micromechanical components, heterogeneous integration of microdevices at wafer level, MEMS integration on soft micromodule.

Bio: Dr. Michel Despont received a Ph.D. in physics from the Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Switzerland, in 1996. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the IBM Research - Zurich laboratory in 1996, he spent one year as a visiting scientist at the Seiko Instrument Research Laboratory in Japan. In 2005, he was appointed manager and led the nanofabrication group at IBM Research – Zurich Laboratory. Since 2013, Dr Despont is currently employed by the Swiss Centre of Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) as Vice-President of the MEMS program and manager of the Emerging Micro&Nano Technologies section in the Micro&Nano Systems division.

CSEM Website.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.


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Leveraging Labs for Learning

Siara Isaac & Cécile Hardebolle

Explore ways to design lab experiments that help students develop a scientific approach which is transferable to real world complexity.


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I M P R O G I N E E R I N G - Création collective : arts improvisés et ingénierie

Présentations publiques des étudiants du cours EPFL-ARSENIC “Création collective : arts improvisés et ingénierie”

Présentation générale: mercredi 15 mai 2019 de 19h30 à 21h15
Présentation finale: mercredi 22 mai 2019, performances de 19h30 à 21h15, table ronde avec le jury de 21h30 à 22h00

Le cours «Création collective: arts improvisés et ingénierie», intégré au programme Sciences Humaines et Sociales (SHS) de l’EPFL, a été élaboré par le Prof. Simon Henein, en collaboration avec le Centre d’art scénique contemporain de Lausanne (Arsenic).
L’enseignement initie les étudiants aux techniques d’improvisation développées dans les arts vivants (théâtre, musique, danse, performance) et interroge leur possible transposition aux pratiques de conception de l’ingénierie. Les processus créatifs collectifs étudiés sont mis en oeuvre au travers d’un projet qui aboutit à une présentation publique sur la scène de l’Arsenic. Les performances improvisées par les étudiants intègrent leurs réalisations techniques, révélant ainsi les polarités et articulations entre leur présence physique et celle de leurs artefacts.
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Metrology with Light: Bright Perspectives!

Karsten Buse, director of Fraunhofer Institute of Physical Measurement Techniques IPM and Professor at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg, heading the group “Optical Systems”. He obtained his PhD at the University of Osnabrück in 1993 in the field of photorefractive materials and effects and received his postdoctoral lecturer qualification (habilitation) at the same place in 1997. He was first a post-doc and then visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology CalTech for more than then 10 years. In 2000, he co-founded the Ondax Inc., Monrovia CA, a company producing Bragg gratings for laser applications. From 2000 to 2010, Karsten Buse was Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Bonn. For his research, he has received several awards, including a NASA Technical Briefs Award and the Karl Heinz Beckurts Award for volume Bragg filters. Moreover, for his work on the optical properties and device applications of lithium niobate, the OSA just recently appointed him as a new Fellow Member (2019). His interests are optical materials, nonlinear optics and whispering gallery resonators. He is the author and co-author of more than 400 publications and patents.  

The measurement of physical parameters with light is contact-free, parallel, of high precision and with excellent temporal resolution. Physicists employ these outstanding properties of light since centuries. Microelectronics and advanced data processing plus innovations in photonics are now making optical metrology fast, robust, compact and cheap, revolutionizing industrial fields like quality control of parts, object- and shape recognition, as well as gas- and process technology. The presentation will visualize this evolution, up to cutting-edge technologies including frequency combs and quantum metrology. Special emphasis will be here on solutions based on second-order nonlinearities and whispering-gallery resonators, with wide spectral coverage.
 


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Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics

Keynote and Invited Speakers on www.diamondphotonics.org

The Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics at EPFL will be a unique event bringing together for the first time the worldwide leaders in diamond photonics. It will gather on EPFL campus the key international players of academic research in physics and photonics, in growth and fabrication technologies, together with companies engaged in bringing the applications of diamond photonics to the market. As a meeting point for physicists, engineers, materials scientists, and entrepreneurs, the symposium will decisively contribute to the emergence of novel quantum technologies in photonics, such as quantum-enhanced sensors and secure communication devices, and of novel industrial photonic components such as cavities for high power lasers.
 


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Shine on, you Nanostructured Diamond (Public Lecture)

Prof. Dr. Marko Lončar,
Harvard University

Public Lecture as part of the Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics

The lecture is open to the large public and introduces the topic of Diamond Photonics in general terms. We welcome in particular also young participants with an interest in science and engineering to join. The event is free of charge, but registration is required. Register here. The lecture will be followed by an apéro. The event receives generous financial support by by the Latsis Foundation. The event is supported by the International Day of Light and has received endorsment by the Optical Society of America.

Abstract: Diamond possesses remarkable physical properties, and in many ways is the ultimate engineering material! For example, diamond is transparent in ultra-violet, visible and infra-red wavelength range, and has a high refractive index, nearly twice that of water. As a result, light that enters diamond crystal is bent, twisted and reflected in exciting ways, resulting in sparklines of the diamond gemstones. Diamond is also the best thermal conductor and therefore can survive exposures to high power laser beams, even. Finally, diamond can be a host to wide variety of atomic impurities that in turn can change its color: from transparent to yellow, pink, even blue. Importantly, these impurities can also emit light, which makes them precious to scientists and engineers.  One particularly exciting application of diamond’s impurities is in the field of quantum information science and technology, which promises realization of powerful quantum computers capable of tackling problems that cannot be solved using classical approaches, as well as realization of secure communication channels. Other applications include detection of weak magnetic fields which is of importance in bio-medicine, navigation and timing, and so on.
I will first review advances in nanotechnology that have enabled fabrication of nanoscale optical devices in diamond – the hardest material on earth. I will then discuss how these devices can be used to generate, manipulate, and store quantum information, one photon at the time, and thus enable realization of secure communication networks. Finally, I will show how nanostructuring of diamond surface can be used to make it completely transparent (a perfect window) or completely reflective (a perfect mirror) to optical beams. Importantly, these windows and mirrors can withstand MegaWatts of laser power.

Biography: Marko Lončar is Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering at Harvard's John A Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), as well as Harvard College Professor. Loncar received his Diploma from University of Belgrade (R. Serbia) in 1997, and his PhD from Caltech in 2003 (with Axel Scherer), both in Electrical Engineering. After completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard (with Federico Capasso), he joined SEAS faculty in 2006. Loncar is expert in nanophotonics and nanofabrication, and his current research interests include quantum and nonlinear nanophotonics, quantum optomechanics, high-power optics, and nanofabrication. He has received NSF CAREER Award in 2009 and Sloan Fellowship in 2010. In recognition of his teaching activities, Loncar has been awarded Levenson Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (2012), and has been named Harvard College Professor in 2017. Loncar is fellow of Optical Society of America, and Senior Member of IEEE and SPIE.
 
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title to be announced

Prof. Claire Hivroz, Institut Curie, Paris (F)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Versatile and scalable approaches to chemical processing of nanocarbons

Prof. Milo Shaffer, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London

Individual perfect nanocarbon structures have exceptional properties; the challenge is often how to exploit their potential in real macroscopic systems. Chemical functionalisation is critical to a wide range of nanocarbon technologies, but needs to be versatile and applicable at scale. Existing approaches tend to rely on liquid phase reactions, often requiring damaging sonication or lengthy work up through filtration or centrifugation. The formation of individualized functionalised single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphenes is a particular challenge.
One approach is to shift the modification reaction into the gas phase. We have developed a generic, scalable furnace treatment, based on the thermochemical activation of CNTs, followed by reaction with functional organic monomers. This approach allows the introduction of a wide variety of functional groups onto the CNT surface whilst maintaining the excellent properties of the untreated materials. The reaction is extremely versatile and can be carried out with a variety of monomers and carbon-based materials, and follows an unusual radical-based mechanism. 
A different approach to nanotube processing, relies on reductive charging to form pure nanotubides (nanotube anions) which can be redissolved, purified, or optionally functionalised, whist avoiding the damage typically associated with sonication and oxidation based processing. This simple system is effective for a host of nanocarbon materials including MWCNTs, ultralong SWCNTs, carbon blacks, and graphenes. The resulting nanocarbon ions can be readily chemically grafted for a variety of applications. Dispersed nanocarbon related materials can be assembled, by electrophoresis, cryogel formation, or direct cross-linking to form Joule heatable networks, protein nucleants, supercapacitor electrodes, and catalyst supports, particularly suited to combination with other 2d materials, such as layered double hydroxides. Comparative studies allow the response of nanocarbons with different dimensionalities to be assessed to identify fundamental trends and the most appropriate form for specific situations.   Charged Carbon Nanomaterials: Redox Chemistries of Fullerenes, Carbon Nanotubes, and GraphenesCHEMICAL REVIEWS, Vol: 118, Pages: 7363-7408, 2018   Fast Exfoliation and Functionalisation of Two-Dimensional Crystalline Carbon Nitride by Framework ChargingANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, Vol: 57, Pages: 12656-12660, 2018   Thermochemical functionalisation of graphenes with minimal framework damageCHEMICAL SCIENCE, Vol: 8, Pages: 6149-6154, 2017
Bio: Milo Shaffer is Professor of Materials Chemistry at Imperial College London, and co-Director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology. He has extensive experience of carbon and inorganic nanomaterials synthesis, modification, characterization, and application, particularly for nanocomposite and hierarchical systems. Key applications are structural composites, electrochemical electrodes, and functional thin films. MS completed his PhD and a Research Fellowship at the University of Cambridge, and has previously worked as a materials technology consultant in the areas of new technology development and exploitation, and has filed around 30 patents/applications, eight of which have been licensed commercially. He has published well nearly 200 peer-reviewed papers with a total of over 15,000 citations, h-Index 57. He was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Meldola medal in 2005, a prestigious EPSRC Leadership Fellowship in 2008, and RSC Corday-Morgan medal in 2014. He sits editorial boards of Nanocomposites & International Materials Reviews, and has helped to organise a number of international nano-related meetings, including several of the Nanotube series, CNP-COMP, and a Faraday Discussion on Advanced Carbon.


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IGM Colloquium: Undulatory swimmers in nature and in the laboratory

Prof. Ramiro Godoy-Diana, ESPCI

Abstract:
Swimmers in nature use body undulations to generate propulsive and manoeuvring forces. The body shape of the swimmer and its motion kinematics act in concert to determine these forces and the associated energy expenditure. I will present our recent work on the fluid-structure interaction problem that underlies these questions, using a flexible thin plate as a minimal model of bio-inspired undulatory swimmer. In a second part of the talk I will discuss the problem of collective dynamics that we have explored using experiments with real fish.
 
Bio:
Dr. Godoy-Diana is a CNRS research scientist at the Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes laboratory (PMMH) at ESPCI in Paris, France. Physical engineer from the Tec de Monterrey (México, 1994), he holds a Master in Physics from the UNAM (México, 1999) and a PhD in fluid dynamics from École Polytechnique (France, 2004). His experimental fluid dynamics work has included research on ocean wave energy, geophysical fluid dynamics, wake instabilities, fluid-structure interaction and bio-inspired propulsion. He co-heads the Biomimetics and fluid-structure interaction group at PMMH.
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Understanding biocompatibility in the performance of Brain Computer Interfaces

Prof Jeff Capadona, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, USA.

Prof. Capadona's laboratory is dedicated to understanding and mitigating the neuroinflammatory response to implanted devices within the central nervous system.  Such devices range from ventricular shunts to various types of stimulating and recording electrodes. Neural devices range in material type, size, architecture, function, and placement. Regardless of any of these variables, the neuroinflammatory response to the implant plays a significant role on the integrity of the healthy tissue and the longevity of device performance. A progressive decline in recordings quality after implantation has been known for over 40 years. Unfortunately, recording instability is still a commonly documented problem. A major portion of Prof. Capadona's work has focused on studying various aspects of intracortical microelectrode performance, and pursuing both materials-based and therapeutic-based methods to mitigate the inflammatory-mediated intracortical microelectrode failure mechanisms. He utilizes basic science techniques to provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the molecular and biological-mediated failure modes for intracortical microelectrodes. This increased understanding provides the framework for the development of targeted materials-based and therapeutic attempts to impact intracortical microelectrode performance. This seminar will provide an overview of the recent highlights and promising strategies to enable long-term clinical successes of intracortical microelectrodes.

Bio
I attended Saint Joseph’s College in Indiana, and started as a Chemistry/Biology major, with aspirations for medical school.  One of the most impactful moments in my life occurred during my junior year of college.  I herniating two discs in my back while training for baseball.  That injury taught me that medical treatment possibilities are limited by scientific innovations.  So, I decided to attend graduate school in a research environment where I could apply my chemistry background towards improving orthopedic implant development.  After graduating with a PhD in Chemistry (Biomedical Engineering minor) from the Georgia Institute of Technology, I moved to Cleveland and took a position with the Advanced Platform Technology Center (APTC).  The APTC is a research center of excellence at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center.  There, I was introduced to the world of medical devices that interface with the nervous system, especially the brain.  I instantly fell in love with the potential life-saving / life-changing impact that developing more stable materials and devices could enable.  In August 2010, I began a tenure track appointment in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. I received tenure and promotion to Associate Professor in 2015. My research has focused on developing strategies to prevent the body from rejecting various type of brain implants.  The implants we work on range from ventricular shunts to drain excess fluid in the brain to electrodes that record brain activity to enable patients to regain movement of damaged limbs or use computers by thinking about the activity.  My research has so far resulted in over 70 peer reviewed scientific manuscripts and ~250 international scientific presentations. However, the most rewarding achievements in are mentoring students to the completion of their own PhD degrees, based on research in my laboratory.


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Logistic and economic challenges to realize a Martian village

Pierre Brisson (Mars Society Switzerland)

The constraints that must be taken into account for the establishment of a Martian Village are well known and solutions to the challenges they put, are theoretically possible. All that is missing is the will to implement them.
 
The constraints are inherent to Mars' specificities and our technological ability to deal with them.
 
Two phases of preparation should be considered. The first is to substantiate on the theoretical level (feasibility studies) what we know and what we have designed, to carry up the necessary technologies to an acceptable Technology Readiness Level, and to structure the financial framework that will allow this concretization and the continuation of the project towards completion. The second is to build the necessary infrastructure for transport, accommodation and services on Mars, and the human operational capacity of the Martian village.
 
Beyond, the problem, more difficult to solve than the establishment of the Martian village, will be to achieve creating the conditions of its sustainability. Success will depend on the dedication of private entrepreneurs who should be leading the project, on maintaining the support of the State agencies (NASA!) throughout the preparation and realization periods, and on getting a positive response of the Public among which the clients will arise. This response will be conditioned on the one hand by the affordability of the prices that the promoters of the Village will be able to offer and on the other hand, by the strength of the clients motivations in the field either of scientific research, or satisfaction of engineering feat or, plainly, adventure spirit. A lasting response will be conditioned by the ability of the Mars residents to make enough money individually and collectively, not to impose a seemingly everlasting burden onto their Earth promoters.

Pierre Brisson was one of the founding members of the US Mars Society in 1998. He became member of the board of its French branch (“ Association Planète Mars”) in 2003 and re-founded its Swiss branch (“Mars Society Switzerland”) in 2009. He graduated as an economist (Master of Arts of the University of Virginia) and worked worldwide as a corporate banker in a major French institution but has always been an “amateur” planetologist. He is regularly organizing or giving conferences in Switzerland and France to spread the idea that Mankind must intensify its robotic and inhabited missions to Mars. He is also contributing one post each week in his blog “exploration spatiale” hosted by Swiss French speaking newspaper Le Temps.


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Neuromodulation of Neural Microcircuits NM² conference



The Blue Brain Project is delighted to announce that it will be hosting the second Neuromodulation of Neural Microcircuits NM² conference led by Srikanth Ramaswamy and Henry Markram. It will take place on May 24 – 26, in Champéry, Valais.

The overarching goal of the second NM² Conference is to provide a unifying and mechanistic view by which an ever-increasing number of neuromodulators, including monoamines, and peptides – the master switches – control genes, proteins, neurons and glia, dendrites, synapses, and emergent states in neural microcircuits across different brain regions in health and disease.
 
Building such a mechanistic view of neuromodulation encounters several fundamental challenges to consider:

  1. How do sensory signals, internal brain states, and computations in microcircuits, trigger the release of specific neuromodulators?
  2. How do neuronal assemblies and larger brain circuits respond to neuromodulators?
  3. How do neuromodulators shape synaptic plasticity and brain states?
To this end, the NM² Conference will bring together researchers to bridge a variety of disciplines using state-of-the-art techniques in different brain regions, towards the common goal of understanding the mechanisms and principles of neuromodulation and addressing the challenges above.
 
Our fundamental objective is to organize a dynamic conference that will highlight an up-to-date view of the neuromodulation of brain states, establish future directions, and attract new talent to drive forward this important field.
 
REGISTRATION
 
To register for the Conference, please click here
 
Please register as soon as possible; only a limited number of seats are available.
 
POSTER ABSTRACTS
 
When submitting an abstract PhD students and Postdocs are encouraged to apply for Blue Brain travel awards to participate in the NM2 Conference. Awards, which are only open to those who submit abstracts, include registration for the Conference (including accommodation and full board), and travel support. Some of the submitted abstracts will be selected for flash talks.
 
 
Please feel free to contact Dace Stiebrina should you have any questions concerning the conference.
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title to be announced

Prof. Fabian Theis, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich (D)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Deep Neural Networks in Electron Microscopy of Quantum Materials: From Learning Physics to Atomic Manipulation

Prof Sergei Kalinin, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory USA

Atomically-resolved imaging of materials has become the mainstay of modern materials science, as enabled by advent of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). However, the wealth of quantitative information contained in the fine details of atomic structure or spectra remains largely unexplored. In this talk, I will present the new opportunities enabled by physics-informed big data and machine learning technologies to extract physical information from static and dynamic STEM images. The deep learning models trained on theoretically simulated images or labeled library data demonstrate extremely high efficiency in extracting atomic coordinates and trajectories, converting massive volumes of statistical and dynamic data into structural descriptors. I further present a method to take advantage of atomic-scale observations of chemical and structural fluctuations and use them to build a generative model (including near-neighbor interactions) that can be used to predict the phase diagram of the system in a finite temperature and composition space. Similar approach is applied to probe the kinetics of solid-state reactions on a single defect level and defect formation in solids via atomic-scale observations. Finally, synergy of deep learning image analytics and real-time feedback further allows harnessing beam-induced atomic and bond dynamics to enable direct atom-by-atom fabrication. Examples of direct atomic motion over mesoscopic distances, engineered doping at selected lattice site, and assembly of multiatomic structures will be demonstrated. These advances position STEM towards transition from purely imaging tool for atomic-scale laboratory of electronic, phonon, and quantum phenomena in atomically-engineered structures.
This research was sponsored by the Division of Basic Energy Sciences, BES, DOE, and was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division.
Bio: Sergei V. Kalinin is the director of the ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials and distinguished research staff member at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as a theme leader for Electronic and Ionic Functionality on the Nanoscale (at ORNL since 2002). He also holds a Joint Associate Professor position at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and an Adjunct Faculty position at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include application of big data, deep data, and smart data approaches in atomically resolved and mesoscopic imaging to guide the development of advanced materials for energy and information technologies, as well as coupling between electromechanical, electrical, and transport phenomena on the nanoscale. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002, followed by a Wigner fellowship at ORNL (2002-2004). He is a recipient of the Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists (2018); RMS medal for Scanning Probe Microscopy (2015); Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) (2009); IEEE-UFFC Ferroelectrics Young Investigator Award (2010); Burton medal of Microscopy Society of America (2010); ISIF Young Investigator Award (2009); American Vacuum Society Peter Mark Memorial Award (2008); R&D100 Awards (2008 and 2010); Ross Coffin Award (2003); Robert L. Coble Award of American Ceramics Society (2009); and a number of other distinctions. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed journal papers, edited 3 books, and holds more than 10 patents. He has organized numerous symposia (including symposia on Scanning Probe Microscopy on Materials Research Society Fall meeting in 2004, 2007, and 2009) and workshops (including International workshop series on PFM and Nanoferroelectrics), and acted as consultant for companies such as Intel and several Scanning Probe Microscopy manufacturers. He is also a member of editorial boards for several international journals, including Nanotechnology, Journal of Applied Physics/Applied Physics Letters, and recently established Nature Partner Journal Computational Materials.


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Bringing Orthogonality in the Tetrazine Ligation with (strained) alkenes

Dr. Kimberley Bonger, Radboud University, Netherlands

The development of bioorthogonal reactions made it possible to visualize and study biomolecules in their native cellular context and contributed to advanced targeted drug delivery strategies. Bonger's research group is interested in developing novel bioorthogonal chemistry and apply this in the targeting of specific cell types. They recently added non-strained, highly soluble and stable vinylboronic acids (VBA) as reactants to the bioorthogonal toolbox which react with tetrazines in an inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder reaction. They have observed exceptional high reaction rates between non-strained vinylboronic acids (VBAs) and dipyridyl tetrazines relative to that of tetrazines lacking such dative coordinating ligand. As VBAs are mild Lewis acids, they hypothesize that coordination of the pyridyl to the boronic acid promotes the tetrazine ligation. In the current presentation, they explore the scope and molecular origins of the observed VBA reactivity in more detail and benefit from its unique properties in the simultaneous orthogonal tetrazine labelling of proteins. In addition, they further extended the VBA toolbox as chemically-triggered cleavable linkers for targeted drug delivery with the specific focus on autoreactive B-cells.
 
References:
1) Selma Eising, Francis Lelivelt, Kimberly M. Bonger*. Vinylboronic Acids as Fast Reacting, Synthetically Accessible, and Stable Bioorthogonal Reactants in the Carboni–Lindsey Reaction. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, 55, 12243.
2) Selma Eising, Nicole van der Linden, Fleur Kleinpenning, Kimberly M. Bonger. Vinylboronic Acids as Efficient Bioorthogonal Reactants for Tetrazine Labeling in Living Cells. Bioconjug. Chem. 2018, 29, 982.
3) Selma Eising, Bo-Tao Xin, Fleur Kleinpenning, Jurriaan J. A. Heming, Bogdan I. Florea, Herman S. Overkleeft and Kimberly M. Bonger* Coordination-Assisted Bioorthogonal Chemistry: Orthogonal Tetrazine Ligation with Vinylboronic Acid and a Strained Alkene, ChemBioChem 2018, 15, 1648.

Biosketch :
Kimberly Bonger obtained her M.Sc degree in Organic Chemistry from the Free University in Amsterdam in 2002. In 2008 she received her PhD from Leiden University working under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Gijs van der Marel and Prof. Dr. Hermen Overkleeft on the design and synthesis of dimeric ligands for G-protein coupled receptors involved in human reproduction. After spending almost four years as a postdoc at Stanford University in the laboratory of Thomas Wandless working on molecular tools to control protein stability, she returned to the Netherlands as an assistant professor in Chemical Biology at the Radboud University in Nijmegen. Her research focusses on the development of novel bioorthogonal reactions and targeted drug delivery strategies as well as the fundamental understanding of cellular mechanisms involved in autoimmunity.
 


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Dynamic optics for laser microfabrication and high-resolution microscopy

Prof. Dr. Martin Booth
University of Oxford

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/351365168

Abstract: I will review recent work on using dynamic optical elements, such as deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators, to increase the capabilities of laser micro fabrication and optical microscopy.  In particular, I will show how adaptive aberration correction and dynamic parallelisation can improve precision and reliability and increase the accessible volume and speed of these systems. Applications of our laser writing technology range from quantum optics, through radiation sensing to security marking of diamond gemstones. Our imaging methods include applications in cell biology, neuroscience and super-resolution microscopy. 

Bio: Prof Booth is Professor of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford. His research group is based in the Department of Engineering Science and has many collaborations in other departments across Oxford. His research involves the development and application of adaptive optical methods in microscopy, laser-based materials processing and biomedical science.  In 2012 Prof Booth was awarded the “Young Researcher Award in Optical Technologies” from the Erlangen School of Advanced Optical Technologies at the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, and a visiting professorship at the university. In 2014 he was awarded the International Commission for Optics Prize. He was appointed Professor of Engineering Science in 2014. He has over one hundred publications in peer-reviewed journals, over fifteen patents, and has co-founded two spin-off companies, Aurox Ltd and Opsydia Ltd

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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IC Research Day - Digital Trust



Trust is indispensable to the prosperity and well-being of societies. For millennia, we developed trust-building mechanisms to facilitate interactions. But as they become increasingly digital, many traditional mechanisms no longer function well, hence trust breaks down. As a result, low levels of trust discourage us from engaging in new forms of interactions and constrain business opportunities. We must therefore re-invent trust mechanisms that will contribute to prosperous and peaceful societies in the digital age.
    
At this year's IC Research Day, world-leading experts will present and discuss their work toward achieving these goals. EPFL researchers will showcase ongoing research projects and engage with the audience.

Date: jeudi, 6 juin, 2019
Lieu: SwissTech Convention Center 
Inscrivez-vous : https://icservices.epfl.ch/m/form.asp?camp=ResearchDay19


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25th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations – ICNF 2019



The International Conference on Fluctuation Phenomena started in 1968 and moved all over the world.  For the first time the conference will take place in Switzerland: the 25th edition (ICNF 2019) will be held at EPFL Microcity in Neuchâtel, from June 18 to June 21, 2019.

The International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations (ICNF) is a biennial event that brings together researchers interested in theoretical and experimental aspects of fluctuations across a wide spectrum of scientific and technological fields.


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High-Resolution Brain Machine Interfaces using Flexible Silicon Electronics

Prof Jonathan Viventi, Duke University, Durham, USA.

Right now, all of the tools that interface with our brains face a fundamental trade-off. We can either sample with low resolution, over large areas of the brain, or we can sample with fine resolution, over very small areas of the brain. This doesn’t fit with the way our brains are structured. With over 12 million neurons in each square cm of brain surface, we need to sample with high resolution over large areas in order to understand the way the brain works. The limitation is wiring. Every contact we put in the brain requires an individual wire and we can’t fit more than about 100 wires inside our heads. Using the same electronics that enable a digital camera to have millions of pixels without millions of wires, we can move some of the signal processing right to the sensors, allowing us to overcome the wiring bottleneck. The challenge is that traditional electronics are rigid and brittle. They are not compatible with the soft, curved surfaces of the brain. The solution is to make electronics that are flexible. Think of a piece of 2x4 lumber and a sheet of paper, they’re both made out of the same material, but have dramatically different physical properties. Leveraging that idea, we can make electronics that are extremely flexible, by making them very thin. Using these flexible electronics, I have developed high-density electrode arrays with thousands of electrodes that do not require thousands of external wires.
This technology has enabled extremely flexible arrays of 1,024 electrodes and soon, thousands of multiplexed and amplified sensors spaced as closely as 25 µm apart, which are connected using just a few wires.  These devices yield an unprecedented level of spatial and temporal micro-electrocorticographic (µECoG) resolution for recording and stimulating distributed neural networks.  I will present the development of this technology and data from in vivo recordings.  I will also discuss how we are translating this technology for both research and human clinical use. 

Bio
Jonathan Viventi is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University. Dr. Viventi earned his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.Eng. and B.S.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University. Dr. Viventi's research applies innovations in flexible electronics, low power analog circuits, and machine learning to create new technology for interfacing with the brain at a much finer scale and with broader coverage than previously possible. He creates new tools for neuroscience research and technology to diagnose and treat neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Using these tools, he collaborates with neuroscientists and clinicians to explore the fundamental properties of brain networks in both health and disease. His research program works closely with industry, including filing six patents and several licensing agreements. His work has been featured as cover articles in Science Translational Medicine and Nature Materials, and has also appeared in Nature Neuroscience, the Journal of Neurophysiology, and Brain. For these achievements, Dr. Viventi was selected to the 2014 MIT Technology Review “Top 35 Innovators Under 35” list, the 2014 Popular Science “Brilliant 10” list and an NSF CAREER Award.
 


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NMC 2019 - STI Workshop on Nanomechanical Sensors

Michael L. Roukes (Caltech), Andrew Cleland (U. Chicago), Scott Manalis (MIT), John E. Sader (U. Melbourne), Beth Pruitt (UCSB), Javier Tamayo (CSIC), Adrian Bachtold (ICFO), Chris Degen (ETHZ), Johannes Fink (IST Austria), Silvan Schmid (TUW), Junchul Lee (KAIST), Cindy Regal (JILA), Anja Boisen (DTU), Paola Cappellaro (MIT), Rachel McKendry (UCL), Eva Weig (U. Konstanz), Armin Knoll (IBM), Matt Matheny (Caltech), Annalisa De Pastina (EPFL), ...

Nanomechanics was born around 35 years ago with the invention of the STM and AFM. It was in the mid-90s when the first nanoelectromechanical devices were fabricated. Since then, nanomechanical systems have been slowly gaining track in the research community and now have become very important in many different applications. The nanomechanical sensors workshop exists since 2003 and has been organized every year gathering the most prominent figures in the nanomechanical sensing community. In the 2019 edition we want to focus our workshop in two of the most promising fields: quantum and bio-sensing. We are putting together an exciting program with 8 keynote speakers and more than 10 invited speakers of the top international tier. We expect to attract around 150-200 people from all over the world. Very importantly, in our even we will put in contact two apparently very separate communities as are quantum and bio-sensing communities. The main objective during the workshop will be to explore the synergies between them. The School of Engineering of EPFL supports the organization of scientific workshops on the EPFL campus on topics of heightened interest at the forefront of research. These workshops attract highly visible and internationally recognizable speakers.
 


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NFYB-1 regulates mitochondrial function and longevity via lysosomal prosaposin

Rebecca George Tharyan Dept. Dr. Adam Antebi, Molecular Genetics of Ageing, Max-Planck-Institut for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, Germany

Mitochondrial activity is critical for cellular vitality and organismal longevity, yet underlying regulatory mechanisms in metazoans remain elusive. To identify mitochondrial regulators, we performed an RNAi screen leveraging the remarkable mitochondrial changes in C. elegans upon recovery from adult reproductive diapause. We discovered NFYB-1, a subunit of the NF-Y transcriptional complex, as a crucial regulator of mitochondrial function. Loss of NFYB-1 leads to reduced mitochondrial gene expression, mitochondrial fragmentation, and abolition of longevity triggered by mitochondrial impairment. Moreover, NFYB-1 deletion disrupts mitochondrial UPRmt factors and mitochondrial-to-cytosolic stress response (MCSR). Multi-omics analysis indicates that NFYB-1 serves as a potent repressor of several ER genes and the ER stress response, as well as lysosomal prosaposin. Downstream of NFYB-1, limiting prosaposin expression alters ceramide and cardiolipin pools, restores mitochondrial fusion, gene expression and longevity. Thus, the NFYB-1/PSAP axis coordinates lysosomal to mitochondrial communication to prolong life.
 


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TRABIT Summer School 2019



In the context of the European ITN Translational Brain Imaging Network (TRABIT) we organise a Computational Magnetic Resonance Brain Imaging Summer School at EPFL.

Our aim is to train young researchers in both a deep understanding of computational neuroimaging methods together with the clinical needs and constraints arising in the treatment of brain disorders.  

Who can apply?
The school is open for PhD students in Switzerland. Selection of the students will be made on the basis of a CV and motivation letter. There are 15 open participation slots.

Venue
The school will take place on the EPFL campus in Lausanne. For more details visit the Program and Venue sections.

For more information: http://trabit2019.epfl.ch
 


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The 12th International Symposium on Linear Drives for Industry Applications - LDIA2019



The 12th International Symposium on Linear Drives for Industry Applications (LDIA) will be held from July 1-3, 2019 in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. The goal of the symposium is to bring together researchers from both academia and industry, and to share research findings and discuss future developments in linear drive technology.

Important dates:
Early bird registration before May 1st 2019

Website:
ldia2019.epfl.ch
 


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CMOS Microelectronics for DNA detection using Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors

Prof. Dr. Pantelis Georgiou
Imperial College London

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/983964754

Abstract: In the last decade, we have seen a convergence of microelectronics into the world of healthcare providing novel solutions for early detection, diagnosis and therapy of disease. This has been made possible due to the emergence of CMOS technology, allowing fabrication of advanced systems with complete integration of sensors, instrumentation and processing, enabling design of miniaturised medical devices which operate with low-power. This has been specifically beneficial for the application areas of DNA based diagnostics and full genome sequencing, where the implementation of chemical sensors known as Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) directly in CMOS has enabled the design of large-scale arrays of millions of sensors that can conduct in-parallel detection of DNA. Furthermore, the scaling of CMOS with Moore’s law and the integration capability with microfluidics has enabled commercial efforts to make full genome sequencing affordable and therefore deployable in hospitals and research labs.
 
In this talk, I present how my lab is advancing the areas of DNA detection and rapid diagnostics through the design of CMOS based Lab-on-Chip systems using ISFETs. I will first introduce the fundamentals and physical properties of DNA as a target molecule and how it can be detected using different modalities through the use of CMOS technology. I will then present methods of design of ISFET sensors and instrumentation in CMOS, in addition to the challenges and limitations that exist for fabrication, providing solutions to allow design of large-scale ISFET arrays for real-time DNA amplification and detection systems. I will conclude with the presentation of state-of-the-art CMOS systems that are currently being used for genomics and point-of-care diagnostics, and the results of our latest fabricated multi-sensor CMOS platform for rapid screening of infectious disease and management of antimicrobial resistance.

Bio: Pantelis Georgiou currently holds the position of Reader (Associate Professor) at Imperial College London within the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is the head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory in the Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology; a multi-disciplinary group that invents, develops and demonstrates advanced micro-devices to meet global challenges in biomedical science and healthcare. His research includes ultra-low power micro-electronics, bio-inspired circuits and systems, lab-on-chip technology and application of micro-electronic technology to create novel medical devices. Application areas of his research include new technologies for treatment of diabetes such as the artificial pancreas, novel Lab-on-Chip technology for genomics and diagnostics targeted towards infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and wearable technologies for rehabilitation of chronic conditions.
 
Dr. Georgiou graduated with a 1st Class Honours MEng Degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2004 and Ph.D. degree in 2008 both from Imperial College London. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering as Research Associate until 2010, when he was appointed Head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory. In 2011, he joined the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, where he currently holds an academic faculty position. He conducted pioneering work on the silicon beta cell and is now leading the project forward to the development of the first bio-inspired artificial pancreas for treatment of Type I diabetes. In addition to this, he made significant contributions to the development of integrated chemical-sensing systems in CMOS. He has pioneered the development of the Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistor, an integrated pH sensor which is currently being used in next generation DNA sequencing machines, demonstrating for the first time its use in low-power weak-inversion, and its capability in a multimodal sensing array for Lab-on-Chip applications. Dr. Georgiou is a senior member of the IEEE and IET and serves on the BioCAS and Sensory Systems technical committees of the IEEE CAS Society. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors and TBioCAS journals. He is also the CAS representative on the IEEE sensors council. In 2013 he was awarded the IET Mike Sergeant Achievement Medal for his outstanding contributions to engineering and development of the bio-inspired artificial pancreas. In 2017, he was also awarded the IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement award. He is an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in Circuits and Systems.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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PRIME 2019: 15th Conference on PhD Research in Microelectronics and Electronics



PRIME has been established over the recent years as an important conference where PhD students and post-docs with less than one year post-PhD experience can present their research results and network with experts from industry, academia and research. PRIME 2019 will feature conference program reflecting the wide spectrum of research topics in Microelectronics and Electronics, building bridges between various research fields. In addition to the technical sessions, opportunities for the conference attendees will be the keynote talks, workshops and social events.

PRIME 2019 is Technically Co-sponsored by IEEE and IEEE CAS. and will be co-located with the International Conference on Synthesis, Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Methods and Applications to Circuit Design (SMACD 2019) https://www.smacd2019.com The conference proceedings will be submitted for inclusion in IEEE Xplore.


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GaN for the Future

Prof. Dr. Debbie Senesky
Stanford University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/165147980

Abstract: There has been a tremendous amount of research and industrial investment in gallium nitride (GaN) as it is positioned to replace silicon in the billion-dollar (USD) power electronics industry, as well as the post-Moore microelectronics universe. In addition, the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for pioneering research in GaN that led to the realization of the energy-efficient blue light-emitting diode (LED). Furthermore, GaN electronics have operated at temperatures as high as 1000°C making it a viable platform for robust space-grade electronics and nano-satellites.  Even with these major technological breakthroughs, we have just begun the “GaN revolution.” New communities are adopting this platform for a multitude of emerging device applications including the following: sensing, energy harvesting, actuation, communication, and photonics.  In this talk, we will review and discuss the benefits of GaN’s two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) over silicon’s p-n junction for these new and emerging applications.  In addition, we will discuss opportunities for transformational development of this semiconductor device platform (e.g., interface engineering, thermal metrology, selective-area doping) to realize future GaN-based electronic systems.
 
Bio: Debbie G. Senesky is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and by courtesy, the Electrical Engineering Department. In addition, she is the Principal Investigator of the EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory (XLab).  Her research interests include the development of micro- and nano-scale sensors, high-temperature wide bandgap (GaN, SiC) electronics, and robust interface materials for operation within extreme harsh environments.   She received the B.S. degree (2001) in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California. She received the M.S. degree (2004) and Ph.D. degree (2007) in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition, she has held positions at GE Sensing (formerly known as NovaSensor), GE Global Research Center, and Hewlett Packard.  She has served on the program committee of the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (Transducers), and International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S).  She is currently co-editor for IEEE Electron Device Letters, Sensors (journal), and Micromachines (journal).   In recognition of her work, she is a recipient of the Emerging Leader Abie Award from AnitaB.org, NASA Early Faculty Career Award, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Ph.D. Fellowship Award. More information about Prof. Senesky can be found at xlab.stanford.edu or on Instagram/Twitter: @debbiesenesky.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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EPFL 50th Anniversary - Research Days - EPFL Valais Wallis, Sion

Programme en cours / Programme coming soon.

The Research Days will bring together key political figures from the area, local industrial partners and academic partners of the EPFL campuses (Sion, Neuchâtel, Geneva, Fribourg, Lausanne). Covering the key themes of each site, the event’s objective is to show how research contributes or can contribute to society, both with political support and through collaboration with industry.

The theme of the event in EPFL Valais Wallis in Sion is Energy.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Microcity, Neuchâtel

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.

La thématique de l'événement à Microcity Neuchâtel est la Microtechnique.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Campus Biotech, Genève

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
La thématique de l'événement au Campus Biotech est la Recherche en neuro et sur le cerveau.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - BlueFactory Fribourg

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
La thématique de l'événement au BlueFactory à Fribourg est l'Eco-bâtiment et écologie.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Campus Lausanne

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
L'événement sur le Campus lausannois de l'EPFL se déclinera autour des projets phares et aura lieu durant les Portes ouvertes de l'EPFL (14 et 15 septembre 2019, https://www.epfl.ch/campus/events/fr/celebration/portes-ouvertes/).
 


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title to be announced

Prof. Richard E. Lenski, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Education:
1973-76    B.A., Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (USA)
1977-82    Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Positions:
1982-85    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA)
1984        Visiting Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (USA)
1985-88    Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1988-91    Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1991-        Hannah Professor of Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)
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Engineering PhD Summit on Intelligent Systems

Detailed program to be announced


The School of Engineering of EPFL is pleased to announce the 2nd annual PhD Summit, a workshop for final year PhD students interested in a career in academia. We invite to campus, on a competitive basis, a group of exceptional graduating PhD students from institutions worldwide.
Selected candidates will be invited to the EPFL campus in Switzerland to present their research and get informal feedback from top faculty of the School of Engineering. Each accepted student will be given the opportunity to visit EPFL laboratories related to the summit theme and have intensive exchange with the lab heads and the students.
The PhD Summit prize for the best presentation and research content will be awarded during the workshop.
Funds for travel and accommodation will be provided for the selected candidates.
The Engineering PhD Summit is organised by the School of Engineering, with the support of the School of Computer and Communication Sciences, the School of Life Sciences and the School of Basic Sciences.


ntelligent systems — software and/or hardware systems that can interact with their dynamic environments, process data, perform proper actions, and improve over time — are becoming ubiquitous. Advancements in information technology, artificial intelligence and control, computing capabilities, instrumentation, sensors and actuators have dramatically increased the pace at which intelligent systems enter our daily lives, e.g. in our software, smartphones, cars, robots, and infrastructure.
Intelligent systems involve exciting scientific and engineering questions: How can we push the technological limits to make intelligent systems more robust, more useful, more intuitive, better at improving and possibly repairing themselves? How can we approach the adaptive behavior exhibited in nature?
The Annual PhD Summit of the School of Engineering at EPFL will cover the theory, design, and applications of intelligent systems with an interdisciplinary perspective. Last year Ph.D. students working in fields such as robotics, embedded systems, internet of things, artificial intelligence, machine learning, computer games, human-computer interfaces, computational neuroscience, and cognitive science, with novel research contributions that fit into the general theme of Intelligent Systems are eligible to apply to the summit.

 
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Flexible Radios and Flexible Networks

Prof. Dr. Alyssa B. Apsel,
Cornell University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/637254875

Abstract: Over the past decades the world has become increasingly connected, with communications driving both markets and social movements.  Low power electronics, efficient communications, and better battery technology have all contributed to this revolution, but the cost and power required for these systems must be pushed further to make cheap, ubiquitous, seamless communication accessible to a wider community.   In this talk I will discuss two engineering approaches to this problem.  I will look at various approaches to drive the power down in radio networks that span across circuits and systems.  I will also look at creative biologically inspired approaches to enabling very low power networks and IoT.  Finally, I will discuss how by adding flexibility and building reconfigurable hardware, we can likewise build lower power and less costly consumer systems that can adapt across protocols and networks and work under changing device technologies.

Bio: Alyssa Apsel received the B.S. from Swarthmore College in 1995 and the Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, in 2002.  She joined Cornell University in 2002, where she is currently Director of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  She was a Visiting Professor at Imperial College, London from 2016-2018.  The focus of her research is on power-aware mixed signal circuits and design for highly scaled CMOS and modern electronic systems.  Her current research is on the leading edge of ultra-low power and flexible RF interfaces for IoT.  She has authored or coauthored over 100 refereed publications including one book in related fields of RF mixed signal circuit design, ultra-low power radio, interconnect design and planning, photonic integration, and process invariant circuit design techniques resulting in ten patents.  She received best paper awards at ASYNC 2006 and IEEE SiRF 2012, had a MICRO “Top Picks” paper in 2006, received a college teaching award in 2007, received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2004, and was selected by Technology Review Magazine as one of the Top Young Innovators in 2004.  She is a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE CAS for 2018-2019, and has also served on the Board of Governors of IEEE CAS (2014-2016) and as an Associate Editor of various journals including IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I and II, and Transactions on VLSI.  She has also served as the chair of the Analog and Signal Processing Technical committee of ISCAS 2011, is on the Senior Editorial Board of JETCAS, as Deputy Editor in Chief of Circuits and Systems Magazine, and as the co-founder and Chair of ISCAS Late Breaking News.  In 2016, Dr. Apsel co-founded AlphaWave IP Corporation, a multi-national Silicon IP provider focused on multi-standard analog Silicon IP solutions for the world of IOT.  As Chief Technology Officer of AlphaWave, Dr. Apsel led the company’s global research capability with offices in Silicon Valley, Toronto, and London. 

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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title to be announced

Prof. Hari Shroff, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Dr. Hari Shroff received a B.S.E. in bioengineering from the University of Washington in 2001, and under the supervision of Dr. Jan Liphardt, completed his Ph.D. in biophysics at the University of California at Berkeley in 2006 . He spent the next three years performing postdoctoral research under the mentorship of Eric Betzig at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus where his research focused on development of photactivated localization microscopy (PALM), an optical superresolution technique. Dr. Shroff is now chief of NIBIB's Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging laboratory, where he and his staff are developing new imaging tools for application in biological and clinical research.
 
 
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Open Science Day



To celebrate the 50th anniversary of EPFL, its President Martin Vetterli invites you to explore what is Open Science with world-class researchers and influential policy makers. How can we successfully transition to digital scholarship? What will knowledge production and dissemination resemble in the future? This day will be dedicated to discussing the promises and challenges of open and reproducible science in various disciplines present at EPFL, from the life sciences to particle physics.
 
The event will take place in the main auditorium of the landmark Rolex Learning Center on EPFL Campus. It is free of charge and is open to everyone. However, registration is required.
 
MORE INFORMATION HERE
 
Open science is a complex and transversal topic that can only be understood when a variety of point of views collide. We are honored to confirm that the following people have accepted our invitation to share their expertise with the participants:
 
Sir Philip Campbell, Editor-in-Chief Springer Nature
Ingrid Daubechies, Duke University
Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General
Maria Leptin, EMBO Director
José Moura, IEEE President Elect
Fernando Perez, University of California Berkeley
Robert-Ian Smits, TU/e Executive Board President
Marcel Salathé, EPFL
Bruno Strasser, University of Geneva
Jeannette Wing, Columbia University

 


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Merging Humans and Machines with Hydrogel Technology

Prof. Dr. Xuanhe Zhao,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/385971995

Abstract: While human tissues and organs are mostly soft, wet and bioactive; machines are commonly hard, dry and biologically inert. Bridging human-machine interfaces is of imminent importance in addressing grand societal challenges in healthcare, security, sustainability, education and joy of living. However, interfacing human and machines is extremely challenging due to their fundamentally contradictory properties. At MIT SAMs Lab, we propose to harness “hydrogel technology” to form long-term, high-efficacy, compatible and seamless interfaces between humans and machines. On one side, hydrogels with similar mechanical and physiological properties as tissues and organs can naturally integrate with human body over the long term, greatly alleviating the foreign body response and mechanical mismatches. On the other side, the hydrogels with intrinsic or integrated electrodes, optical fibers, sensors, actuators and circuits can effectively bridge external machines and human bodies via electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical interactions. In this talk, I will first discuss the mechanisms to design extreme properties for hydrogels, including tough, resilient, adhesive, strong and antifatigue, for long-term robust human-machine interfaces.  Then I will discuss a set of novel hydrogel devices that interface with the human body, including i). hydrogel neural probes capable of electro-opto-fluidic interrogation of single neurons in mice over life time; ii). ingestible hydrogel pills capable of continuously monitoring core-body physiological conditions over a month;  and iii). untethered fast and forceful hydrogel robots controlled by magnetic fields for minimal invasive operations. I will conclude the talk by proposing a systematic approach to design next-generation human-machine interfaces based on hydrogel technology.

Bio: Xuanhe Zhao is an associate professor in mechanical engineering at MIT. His research group designs soft materials that possess unprecedented properties to address grant societal challenges. Dr. Zhao is the recipient of the early career award and young investigator award from National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Society of Engineering Science, American Vacuum Society, Adhesion Society, Materials Today, Journal of Applied Mechanics, and Extreme Mechanics Letters. He held the Hunt Faculty Scholar at Duke, and the d'Arbeloff Career Development Chair and Noyce Career Development Professor at MIT. He was selected as a highly cited researcher by Web of Science in 2018.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Dr. Silvano De Franceschi - IMT Distinguished Lecture

Dr. Silvano De Franceschi
CEA-INAC


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/982557518

Abstract and Bio to follow.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program


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title to be announced

Prof. Jussi Taipale, Cambridge University (UK)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
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