Upcoming Seminars and Events

Instagram contest #backatEPFLlibrary



After more than 100 days of closure, the Library partially reopened its doors to EPFL students (by reservation) on 1 July 2020. Take part in the Instagram contest #backatEPFLlibrary to immortalise the return of students to the Rolex Learning Center during this particular revision period. The authors of the three best pictures selected by the librarians will receive prizes. Grab your smartphones and welcome back to EPFL Library!

Terms and condition
The EPFL Library organizes a photography contest on its Instagram account https://www.instagram.com/epfllibrary/. Each participant, as long as the participation conditions are respected, can publish on Instagram a photo related to the contest theme #backatEPFLlibrary. The interpretation of the theme is broad. The participants must add the hashtag #backatEPFLlibrary to their photo(s). The published photos for the contest can be visited through the above-mentioned hashtag.

Deadline
Participation to the contest begins on Thursday, 2nd of July and ends on Sunday, 9th of August 2020 at midnight (GMT+1). The pictures must be posted within this period; those published before or after will not be considered. Winners will be announced shortly after the deadline.

Participation
Any person, who has a public Instagram account and following @EPFLlibrary account can participate. If you have a private Instagram account, please let us know and we will follow you. The only condition to participate in the contest: the photo must be related to the theme #backatEPFLlibrary. Each participant can post up to 3 photos for the contest. The photos must be the participants' own work, taken with a smartphone or a camera and in the EPFL Library.

Image right
The participant must ask any persons appearing in submitted photographs for permission to be published within the framework of the contest and must inform them on the present conditions.

Prizes
A jury will choose three winners who will receive prizes. The winners will receive an email with information regarding where and when they can receive their prize.

Use of pictures
The EPFL Library reserves the right to publish on its own channels, social media pages and communication supports, the participants' photographs, especially to announce the contest winners. EPFL Library mentions and credits photos' authors under a CC-BY Creative Commons license.

Terms modifications and agreement
Participation to the contest requires the complete agreement, without any reserve, of the present terms and conditions. By participating to the contest, the participant agrees to the present terms and conditions. In case of violation of the rules, a participation will be invalidated. Any disagreement regarding the interpretation or application of the terms and conditions will be resolved by the contest organizer, without any appeal possible. The organizer reserves the right to exclude from the contest any photo deemed inappropriate. The organizer also reserves the right to modify the present terms and conditions, to postpone or cancel the contest, if circumstances require it.
Legal action is not allowed.

Bibliothèque de l’EPFL, Lausanne, July 2020
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Flipping a Class -online

Ingrid Le Duc

This online workshop is also a demonstration of a flipped class, and will offer participants the opportunity to reflect on when to employ flexible or fixed components. Participants will work on the design of their own course and consider applying some of the techniques from the workshop: moodle, pre-recorded lectures, electronic voting and video conferencing.


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Innovation Today



Innovation happens when business, design, and tech meet. 

In a series of virtual conferences and masterclasses (in person), internationally renowned speakers will share their experience, case studies and behind-the-scenes insights into innovation in Switzerland, within Silicon Valley, and around the world. They will also share their practical tools and methods that inspire thousands of specialists and the world's most innovative companies on a daily basis. 

Innovation Today (#itoday) focuses on inspiring personalities: thinkers, best-selling authors and creators who have a direct impact on today's and tomorrow's world. 

With the following speakers:
  • Alex Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur (CH) inventors of the Business Model Canvas and authors of Business Model Generation which sold more than 1.5 million copies in 30 languages. They are holders of the prestigious Thinkers50 Strategy Award (#4)
  • Jake Knapp (USA) is the inventor of Google Venture’s Design Sprint methodology. He is considered one of the most influential Product Designers today. He has coached teams at places such as Google, Slack, LEGO, IDEO, and NASA on design strategy and time management.
  • Surya Vanka (USA) is a transdisciplinary designer who has worked at the leading edge of physical and digital experiences. He is founder of Authentic Design, president emeritus of the Seattle Design. Festival and was chair of Interaction Week. Surya was director of user experience at Microsoft
  • Ramatoulaye A. Diallo (SEN) is the CEO of Orange Money in Senegal and Director of Mobile Financial Services in the Orange Sonatel cluster across 5 countries. Her mission is to create products, services and communities that elevate millions of African lives. 
  • Professor Marc Gruber (DE, CH) is Vice President for Innovation at EPFL, full professor at the College of Management of Technology at EPFL where he holds the Chair of Entrepreneurship and Technology Commercialization (ENTC), and co-author of Where to Play.
  • Katie Swindler (USA) is a User Experience Strategist at Allstate insurance, Author of Life & Death Design. She believes if brands wish to truly connect with consumers they must combine emotion and utility, storytelling and technology
  • Jonas Vonlanthen (CH) is a Partner at Liip Digital Progress, Expert in agile management and self-organisation in Switzerland. As Partner at Liip, he focuses on the organisation’s evolution from a hierarchical to a self-managed governance system (holacracy).

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Interactive Teaching when Streaming

Siara Isaac

This online workshop offers a participative example of how to increase engagement and interaction during live streaming online sessions, including when you have some students in the classroom. The research evidence, e.g. from cognitive science, in favour of active learning is very strong. However, the challenges of stimulating high engagement online are daunting.
This workshop will prompt you to consider how you can successfully translate your on campus approach to online, or hybrid online/on campus. We will explore some interaction strategies, and also dig into the micro actions (phrasing, timing, etc.) that make the difference between a flat and sparkling level of student participation.


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From bench to bedside - a fantastic voyage of drug/device development - Europe and US

Gautam Maitra, AC Immune
Hasnaà Haddouck, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum
Norma Shafer, Steadmed Mediacal
Ary Saaman, Debiotech
Claude Amman, Amman Consulting
Ajit Simh, San Diego
Matthew Scherer, FDA - Europe Office

4-week fully online course (60-70 hours in total) jointly organized by EPFL and the College of Sciences, San Diego State University. Experienced instructors from Europe and the US will introduce you to the fundamentals of drug/device development, and the requirements for regulatory and quality compliance. You will have exposure to the requirements in Europe and the US in terms of the approach, the attitude to risk-taking, and the cultural divide.

Who can participate?

  • Members of Swiss Academic Institutions with a minimum of a Bachelor degree, in a relevant field
  • Members of early Start-ups, linked to a Swiss University, may be eligible; please contact the organizer

Practical information:
  • Starts on September 7, 2020
  • 4-weeks fully online interactive course with a total of 60-70 hours, including lectures, team-work and self-study
  • Jointly organized by EPFL and the College of Sciences, San Diego State University
  • Highly experienced instructors from Europe and US, including member of FDA
  • Pricing: non-EPFL members 400 CHF, EPFL members 200 CHF
  • Limited participants, first come first served

Why should you participate?
Advances in biotechnology, medical technology, and information technology give new hope for treating diseases never imagined before. To bring these advances from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside requires training and experience that are not available in academia, this course is intended to fill that gap.
Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
  • Describe the major steps of the drug and device development process from bench to bed-side
  • Compare and contrast US and European Union regulatory and quality requirements
  • Discuss the basics of a Quality Management System
  • Develop a Product Profile for a drug/device product or therapy
  • Draft the basic components of a Development Plan for a Phase 1 clinical trial, including a pre-clinical Plan, a Clinical Trial Protocol, and CMC (Chemistry, Manufacturing and Controls) Plan
  • Work with other life science professionals on a team
  • Feel more confident about job seeking and job interviews
 
More info and registration
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Interactive Teaching when Streaming

Siara Isaac

This online workshop offers a participative example of how to increase engagement and interaction during live streaming online sessions, including when you have some students in the classroom. The research evidence, e.g. from cognitive science, in favour of active learning is very strong. However, the challenges of stimulating high engagement online are daunting.
This workshop will prompt you to consider how you can successfully translate your on campus approach to online, or hybrid online/on campus. We will explore some interaction strategies, and also dig into the micro actions (phrasing, timing, etc.) that make the difference between a flat and sparkling level of student participation.


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Towards softer and more tissue-resembling elastomers

Prof. Dr. Anne Ladegaard Skov,
Technical University of Denmark, DTU


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/927149523

Abstract: Soft robotics put a demand forward for softer and softer materials with mechanical integrity and stability over time. Hydrogels are natural candidates with respect to the softness and to some extent with respect to the mechanical integrity, but over time, hydrogels change properties due to the change of water content. Silicone elastomers are the excellent for soft robotics due to their inherent softness, mechanical integrity and stability both with respect to temperature (between -100 and 300◦C) and deformation (mechanical stability for more than 100 mio cycles is not uncommon). However, silicone elastomers are challenged with demands of elastic moduli below ~500 kPa. Various network structures have been made to decrease the elastic moduli beyond the natural lower limit arising from the elastic response from entanglements. Amongst these structures are slide-ring elastomers, bottlebrush elastomers, and a completely novel type of elastomer where the origin of elasticity is currently not understood. The pros and cons of these network synthesis methods and the resulting properties will be discussed in this talk.

Bio: Anne Ladegaard Skov is a professor of polymer science and engineering specialising in design and utilization of silicone elastomers in the Danish Polymer Centre at Department of Chemical Engineering, DTU. She holds a PhD in polymer physics from DTU. She was a research fellow at Cambridge University, UK, before taking up a position as assistant professor at DTU. She has headed the Danish Polymer Centre sinde 2016. In 2018 she was promoted to full professor. She has worked with functionalisation and formulation of silicone elastomers with main focus on silicone elastomers used and optimised for dielectric elastomers and more recently for flexible electronics and drug delivery amongst others.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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CIS - Colloquium by Prof. Radhika Nagpal

Prof.Radhika Nagpal

Prof.Radhika Nagpal is the Fred Kavli Professor of Computer Science School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering Harvard University.   

Abstract:



The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, SB, and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems. In June 2020, CIS has launched its CIS Colloquia featuring invited notable speakers.
More info https://www.epfl.ch/research/domains/cis/center-for-intelligent-systems-cis/events/colloquia/
 


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Startup Champions Seed Night 2020



The Startup Champions Seed Night is an annual startup presentation event bringing together the most promising entrepreneurs from EPFL and beyond, angel investors, mentors, industry leaders and scientists for an audience of 250+ people. The objective of the event is to showcase fast-growing entrepreneurial projects to the community and educate the audience about seed investment.

More info on the EPFL Alumni website.


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Deciphering the molecular secrets of the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic

Prof. Melanie Blokesch

Abstract:
Cholera is a devastating diarrheal disease that sickens millions of people each year. Despite incredible progress over the past hundred years in our understanding of the pathogen’s virulence mechanisms, we still lack crucial information related to its transmission. While we know that the route of transmission occurs mostly via contaminated water, it is still not entirely clear why cholera outbreaks in endemic regions often follow seasonal patterns. Indeed, the environmental aspects of the causative agent of the disease, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, have so far been insufficiently studied at the molecular level. In my talk, I will address this knowledge gap and present insights into the pathogen’s environmental lifestyle including its potential to form bacterial communities on biotic surfaces and its evolvability. I will also show how the bacterium actively seeks genetic material from neighbors while defending itself against mobile genetic mobile elements, bacterial competitors, and eukaryotic grazers. I will end my talk with speculations on how these environmental features might prime the pathogen for interbacterial competition and intestinal colonization.
Short Bio:
Melanie Blokesch obtained her doctoral degree in Biology from the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, where her research focused on metalloenzyme maturation and hydrogen production in bacteria. During a four years postdoctoral stay within the Department of Microbiology & Immunology of Stanford University, USA she switched her research topic towards the study of infectious agents. She joined the faculty of the School of Life Sciences of EPFL in 2009, first as Assistant Professor and later as Associate Professor. While at EPFL, she obtained two consecutive ERC grants, became a Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Scholar, and was elected as a member of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). As service to the community, she also accepted her election to the National Research Council of the Swiss National Science Foundation in 2018.
 
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CIS - "Get to know your neighbors" Seminar series - Prof. Simone Deparis

Dr. Jan Kerschgens, Directeur exécutif du CIS
 

The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, SB, and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems.
 
In order to promote exchanges among researchers and encourage the creation of new, collaborative projects, CIS is organizing a "Get to know your neighbors" series. Each seminar will consist of 1-2 short overview presentations geared to the general public at EPFL.
 
Our second seminar will take place live on Zoom: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/95904377229
 
Monday, 5th October 2020 from 3:15 to 4:15 pm


NB: Video recordings of the seminars will be made available on our website and published on our social media pages


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Copying Brain

Prof. Dr. Donhee Ham,
Harvard University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/934241343

Abstract: Massively parallel, intracellular recording of a large number of mammalian neurons across a network has been a great technological pursuit in neurobiology, but it has not been achieved until our recent breakthrough [1]. For example, the intracellular recording by the patch clamp revolutionized neurobiology with its unparalleled sensitivity that can measure down to subthreshold synaptic activities, but it is too bulky to scale into a dense array, and only ~10 parallel patch recordings have so far been possible. For another example, the microelectrode array (MEA) can record from many more neurons, but this extracellular technique has too low a sensitivity to tap into synaptic events. In this talk, I will share the recent breakthrough of ours [1], a CMOS nanoelectrode array that massively parallelizes the intracellular recording from thousands of connected mammalian neurons. I will also explore the applications of this unprecedented tool in fundamental and applied neurobiology, in particular, functional connectome mapping, high-throughput drug screening for neurological disorder, and copying biological neuronal networks as a possible new synthesis of machine intelligence.

[1] J. Abbott et al, “A nanoelectrode array for obtaining intracellular recordings from thousands of connected neurons,”  Nature Biomed. Eng., doi: 10.1038/s41551-019-0455-7 (2019)

Bio: Donhee Ham is Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics and EE at Harvard and Samsung Fellow. He earned a BS in physics from Seoul National University. Following a military service, he went to Caltech for graduate training, where he worked in LIGO under Prof. Barry Barish in physics, and later obtained a PhD in EE winning the Wilts Prize for the best EE thesis. His experiences/recognitions include IBM T. J. Watson Research, distinguished visiting professorship at Seoul National University, IEEE conference committees (e.g., ISSCC), distinguished lecturer for IEEE SSC Society, associate editor for IEEE TBioCAS, IBM faculty fellowship, and MIT TR35. His intellectual focus includes neuro-electronic interface, neuromorphic processor, low-dimensional and quantum devices, NMR technology, and integrated circuits.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMX Seminar Series - Novel approaches for electron tomography to investigate the structure and stability of nanomaterials in 3 dimensions

Prof. Sara Bals, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Nanomaterials are important for a wide range of applications because of their unique properties, which are strongly connected to their three-dimensional (3D) structure. Electron tomography has therefore been used in an increasing number of studies. Most of these investigations resulted in 3D reconstructions with a resolution at the nanometer scale, but also atomic resolution was achieved in 3D. However, the increasing complexity of nanomaterials has driven the development of even more advanced 3D characterization techniques. 
 
Moreover, in order to preserve the carefully designed morphologies and functionalities, understanding the stability of nanomaterials during application is of equal importance. It is hereby important to note that most electron tomography investigations have been performed at the conventional conditions of an electron microscope. An emerging challenge is therefore  to fully understand the connection between the 3D structure and properties under realistic conditions, including high temperatures as well as in the presence of liquids and gases. Therefore, innovative methodologies are required to track the fast 3D changes of nanomaterials that occur under such conditions.
 


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IMX Seminar Series - Operando and insitu experiments at large xray and neutron facilities

Prof. Helena van Swygenhoven, EPFL, Switzerland

Thanks to the increased brightness of xray and neutron beams at large facilities and to the enormous progress made in detector technology, insitu and operando experiments have become possible, adding the timescale to microstructural and mechanical characterization techniques. Compared to traditional post-mortem studies, such experiments enable an easier interpretation of processes occurring in materials under service or synthesis, allowing pinning down the chronological sequence between events and providing accurate input for computational modeling.
This lecture will illustrate recent insitu and operando experiments that NXMM/PEM carried out at the Swiss large facilities SLS and SINQ using scattering/diffraction and imaging techniques. Topics such as laser based additive manufacturing of net-shaped metal and ceramic components, phase transformations under multiaxial loading and precipitation mechanism in gold alloys will be addressed.
 


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IMX Seminar Series - TBD

Prof. Ralph Claessen, Würzburg University, Germany


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CIS - Colloquium by Ms Kay Firth-Butterfield

Madame Kay Firth-Butterfield

Ms. Kay Firth-Butterfield is currently the Head of AI and Machine Learning and Member of the Executive Committee at World Economic Forum.
Abstract:



The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, SB, and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems. In June 2020, CIS has launched its CIS Colloquia featuring invited notable speakers.
More info https://www.epfl.ch/research/domains/cis/center-for-intelligent-systems-cis/events/colloquia/
 


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Information and Light in Complex Media

Prof. Dr. Allard Mosk,
Utrecht University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/119888136

Abstract: Random scattering of light, which takes place in paper, paint and biological tissue is an obstacle to imaging and focusing of light and thus hampers applications ranging from laser ablation to precision measurements. At the same time scattering is a phenomenon of basic physical interest as it allows the study of fascinating interference effects such as open transport channels [1,2], which enable lossless transport of waves through strongly scattering materials. The frequency bandwidth of these channels [3] is critical to their usefulness as it determines their ability to carry pulses and their information-carrying capacity. After a broad overview of the field, we present new measurements of the frequency bandwidth and intensity fluctuations in these channels. Moreover, we show that  optimizing the incident light wave is essential to  extract precise information about the position of any scatterer. The information we retrieve turns out to be limited by our knowledge of the position of the other scatterers and the local density of states [5].

Bio: Allard Mosk (1970) started his physics career in ultracold atomic gases with work in Amsterdam (Ph.D. 1994), Heidelberg, and Paris, performing the first observation of a Feshbach resonance in Li, and of photoassociation of H. In 2003 he joined the Complex Photonic Systems group at the University of Twente. where he pioneered wavefront shaping methods to focus and image through strongly scattering media. Since 2015 he holds a chair at Utrecht University, The Netherlands, where he studies statistical properties of light in complex scattering media with a view on imaging and optical precision measurements.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)

References:

  1. A. P. Mosk, A. Lagendijk, G. Lerosey, and M. Fink, Controlling waves in space and time for imaging and focusing in complex media, Nat. Photon., 6, 283 (2012).
  2. I.M. Vellekoop and A.P. Mosk, Universal optimal transmission of light through disordered materials, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 120601 (2008).
  3. Jeroen Bosch, Sebastianus A. Goorden, and Allard P. Mosk, Frequency width of open channels in multiple scattering media, Opt. Expr. 24, 26472-26478 (2016)
  4. X. Xu, X. Xie, A. Thendiyammal, H. Zhuang, J. Xie, Y. Liu, J. Zhou, and A. P. Mosk, Imaging of objects through a thin scattering layer using a spectrally and spatially separated reference, Opt. Express 26 (12), 15073–15083 (2018).
  5. D. F. Bouchet, R. Carminati, and A. P. Mosk, Influence of the local density of states on the localization precision of single particles in scattering environments, arXiv. org 1909.02501 (2019).

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IMX Seminar Series - Excitons and Phonons in 2D perovskites

Prof. Paulina Plochocka, CNRS Toulouse, France

High environmental stability and surprisingly high efficiency of solar cells based on 2D perovskites have renewed interest in these materials. These natural quantum wells consist of planes of metal-halide octahedra, separated by organic spacers.  Remarkably the organic spacers play crucial role in optoelectronic properties of these compounds.The characteristic for ionic crystal coupling of excitonic species to lattice vibration became particularly important in case of soft perovskite lattice. The nontrivial mutual dependencies between lattice dynamics, organic spacers and electronic excitation manifest in a complex absorption and emission spectrum which detailed origin is subject of ongoing controversy. First, I will discuss electronic properties of 2D perovskites with different thicknesses of the octahedral layers and two types of organic spacer.  I will demonstrate that the energy spacing of excitonic features depends on organic spacer but very weakly depends on octahedral layer thickness. This indicates the vibrionic progression scenario which is confirmed by high magnetic fields studies up to 67T. Finally, I will show that in 2D perovskites, the distortion imposed by the organic spacers governs the effective mass of the carriers.  As a result, and unlike in any other semiconductor, the effective mass in 2D perovskites can be easily tailored.  
 


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IMX Seminar Series - Polymer Brushes on Gels: Imitating the Lubricious Properties of Cartilage

Prof. Nic Spencer, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Cartilage is an extraordinary material, both in terms of its impressive lubricious properties and the
fact that it continues to function, without a blood supply, for many decades, providing very low friction coefficients. In the simplest terms, cartilage consists of a hydrogel material with a stiffness gradient that interfaces to bone, attached, at the outer edge, to loose polysaccharide chains, which are thought to provide a lubricating function. Polymer brushes, which bear a resemblance to these loose chains, are well known for their lubricious properties, but when coating hard-hard contacts, minor disturbances in tribological conditions or the inclusion of foreign bodies, can rapidly lead to catastrophic failure, as asperities on one hard countersurface encouter the opposing brush. This problem is significantly reduced when the underlying substrate is soft, as in the cartilage case. When imitating cartilage, elastomers can provide this soft base layer, but an even more effective substrate for brushes in tribological applications is a gel. These can be readily tailored to ensure compatibility with the brush, and provide a number of cushioning functions, including elastic, viscoelastic, and porelastic, depending on the loading conditions. In our laboratory, we have explored a variety of systems for imitating cartilage, some of which have actually reached comparable friction coefficients to those observed in cartilage, as well as toughness values and wear resistance that render them of interest for medical and industrial applications.
 


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IMX Seminar Series - Adaptive polymer assemblies with life-like features

Prof. Jan van Hest, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands

Compartmentalization is generally regarded as one of the key prerequisites for life. To better understand the role of compartmentalization, there is a clear need for model systems that can be adapted in a highly controlled fashion, and in which life-like properties can be installed. Polymer-based compartments are robust and chemically versatile, and as such are a useful platform for the development of life-like compartments. In this lecture we discuss polymer vesicles, which are modified in shape and function to show life-like features as catalytic activity, motility and transient behavior.  A second platform technology is based on complex coacervates, stabilized by a biodegradable block copolymer. The specific feature of the polymer membrane is its semipermeable character.  Enzymes inside the protocell can therefore still be reached by their substrates, and small molecule products can be excreted. This allows protocell communication with this robust synthetic platform.


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Polymer-based artificial synapses: Using protons and electrons to impart plasticity to semiconductors

Prof. Dr. Alberto Salleo,
Stanford University


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/843927942

Abstract: Organic semiconductors have been traditionally developed for making low-cost and flexible transistors, solar cells and light-emitting diodes. In the last few years, emerging applications in health case and bioelectronics have been proposed. A particularly interesting class of materials in this application area takes advantage of mixed ionic and electronic conduction in certain semiconducting polymers. Indeed, the ability to transduce ionic fluxes into electrical currents is useful when interacting with living matter or bodily fluids. My presentation will first discuss the fundamental aspects of how mixed conduction works in polymeric materials and show some applications in biosensing. The bulk of my talk will focus on polymer-based artificial synapses.
The brain can perform massively parallel information processing while consuming only ~1- 100 fJ per synaptic event. I will describe a novel electrochemical neuromorphic device that switches at record-low energy (<0.1 fJ projected, <10 pJ measured) and voltage (< 1mV, measured), displays >500 distinct, non-volatile conductance states within a ~1 V operating range. Furthermore, it achieves record classification accuracy when implemented in neural network simulations. Our organic neuromorphic device works by combining ionic (protonic) and electronic conduction and is essentially similar to a concentration battery. The main advantage of this device is that the barrier for state retention is decoupled from the barrier for changing states, allowing for the extremely low switching voltages while maintaining non-volatility. Our synapses display outstanding speed (<20 ns) and endurance achieving over 109 switching events with very little degradation all the way to high temperature (up to 120°C). These properties, which are unheard of in the realm of organic semiconcuctors, are very promising in terms of the ability to integrate with Si electronics to demonstrate online learning and inference. When connected to an appropriate access device our device exhibits excellent linearity, which is an important consideration for neural networks that learn with blind updates.

Bio: Alberto Salleo is currently Full Professor of Materials Science and Department Chair at Stanford University. Alberto Salleo holds a Laurea degree in Chemistry from La Sapienza and graduated as a Fulbright Fellow with a PhD in Materials Science from UC Berkeley in 2001. From 2001 to 2005 Salleo was first post-doctoral research fellow and successively member of research staff at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. In 2005 Salleo joined the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Stanford as an Assistant Professor in 2006. Salleo is a Principal Editor of MRS Communications since 2011.While at Stanford, Salleo won the NSF Career Award, the 3M Untenured Faculty Award, the SPIE Early Career Award, the Tau Beta Pi Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award, and the Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, Stanford’s highest teaching award. He has been a Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher since 2015, recognizing that he ranks in the top 1% cited researchers in his field.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMX Seminar Series - TBD

Prof. Alex Hoffmann, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA


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IMX Seminar Series - Injectable synthetic building blocks to regenerate soft anisotropic tissues

Prof. Laura De Laporte, Leibniz Institute / RWTH Aachen, Germany

We apply polymeric molecular and nano- to micron-scale building blocks to assemble soft 3D biomaterials with anisotropic and dynamic properties. Microgels and fibers are produced by technologies based on fiber spinning, microfluidics, and in-mold polymerization. To arrange the building blocks in a spatially controlled manner, self-assembly mechanisms and assembly by external magnetic fields are employed. For example, the Anisogel technology offers a solution to regenerate sensitive tissues with an oriented architecture, which requires a low invasive therapy. It can be injected as a liquid and structured in situ in a controlled manner with defined biochemical, mechanical, and structural parameters. Magnetoceptive, anisometric microgels or short fibers are incorporated to create a unidirectional structure. Cells and nerves grow in a linear manner and the fibronectin produced by fibroblasts is aligned. Regenerated nerves are functional with spontaneous activity and electrical signals propagating along the anisotropy axis of the material. Another developed platform is a thermoresponsive hydrogel system, encapsulated with plasmonic gold-nanorods, which actuates by oscillating light. This system elucidates how rapid hydrogel beating leads to a reduction in cell migration, while enhancing focal adhesions, native production of extracellular matrix, and nuclear translocation of mechanosensitive proteins, depending on the amplitude and frequency of actuation.


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CIS - Colloquium by Prof. Bin Yu

Prof. Bin YU

Prof. Bin YU is currently Chancellor's Professor in the Departments of Statistics and of Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley.
Abstract:



The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, SB, and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems. In June 2020, CIS has launched its CIS Colloquia featuring invited notable speakers.
More info https://www.epfl.ch/research/domains/cis/center-for-intelligent-systems-cis/events/colloquia/
 


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IMT Distinguished Lecture - Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenbrunner

Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenbrunner
Johannes Kepler University Linz


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne BM 5202 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream:

Abstract:

Bio:

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program

Note: After the lecture, there will be time for discussion and interaction with the distinguished speaker, sandwich lunch and refreshments sponsored by the Institute of Microengineering will be provided for attendees in front of the lecture hall (BM 5104, ca. 13h15)


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IMX Seminar Series - The challenges and opportunities of sustainable materials

Prof. Fiorenzo Omenetto, Tufts University, USA

Natural materials offer new avenues for innovation across fields, bringing together, like never before, natural sciences and high technology. Significant opportunity exists in reinventing naturally-derived materials, such as structural proteins, and applying advanced material processing, prototyping, and manufacturing techniques to these ubiquitously present substances.  This approach help us imagine and realize sustainable, carbon-neutral strategies that operate seamlessly at the interface between the biological and the technological worlds. Some of these opportunities include biomaterials-based applications in edible and implantable electronics, food preservation, functional packaging, energy harvesting, wearable sensors, compostable technology, distributed environmental sensing, medical devices and therapeutics, biospecimen stabilization, advanced medical diagnostics, and will be outlined in this talk.
Bio: Fiorenzo G. Omenetto is the Frank C. Doble Professor of Engineering, and a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts University. He also holds appointments in the Department of Physics and the Department of Electrical Engineering. His research interests are in the convergence of technology, biologically inspired materials and the natural sciences with an emphasis on new transformative approaches for sustainable materials for high-technology applications. Prof. Omenetto was formerly a J. Robert Oppenheimer Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratories, a Guggenheim Fellow.  He is a 2017 Tällberg Foundation Global Leader,  a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the National Academy of Inventors, and of the American Physical Society. His research has been featured extensively in the press with coverage in the most important media outlets worldwide. 


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