Upcoming Seminars and Events

Radio Hack Europe 2019 (29-31 March, EPFL) – Register Now!



Are you interested in shaping the future of radio and media? Registration to Radio Hack Europe is now open and is FREE for EPFL / UNIL employees, researchers, and students using the discount code HKSPO19LS.

Register here

Radio Hack Europe by Radiodays Europe is a 48-hour hackathon around the theme “Radio and media of tomorrow”, which will take place at EPFL from Friday evening 29 March 2019 (warm-up and team building) to Sunday afternoon 31 March 2019 (pitching and jury voting), right before the main Radiodays Europe conference. Participation is open to media professionals, entrepreneurs, researchers, students, and anyone with a keen interest in audio, media, and technology.

Participants are invited to work in multidisciplinary teams and prototype new concepts, products, or services, in an effort to re-think the way people access and consume media content. At the end of the hackathon, the best projects will be awarded and the winners will have the opportunity to present their work during the main Radiodays Europe conference (1-2 April, STCC).

Further information on the registration, program, accommodation (including reduced rates on hotels), venue, and a discounted rate for the main Radiodays Europe conference can be found on the Radio Hack Europe website.
 


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EDAM DAY

See the enclosed program

This annual meeting day has multiple objectives.

  • One objective is to give our doctoral students a chance to get to know each other better and to network with other people interested in their research topic (the day is opened to a broader audience than EPFL).
  • A second objective is to hear about other disciplines of ‘advanced manufacturing’ that they may not be familiar with.
  • A third one is to practice presenting their work to a broader audience (poster session).
EDAM is a small and young doctoral school, but fast and steadily growing. As our students are a small number (more or less 20), it gives also the possibility to organize extra things such as lab tours that will take place in the afternoon.
For organizational purpose, we would like to kindly ask you to confirm your presence by filling up your name in the doodle below. https://epfl.doodle.com/poll/mm6kbrmn2daf45iq
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Reasoning in Bayesian Opinion exchange Networks is Computationally Hard

Dr. Jan Hazla, MIT Jan Hązła is a Postdoctoral Associate at MIT Institute for Data, Systems and Society (IDSS). He received MSc in computer science from Jagiellonian University (Kraków, Poland) and PhD in computer science from ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Directly before coming to MIT, he spent a year as a teaching assistant at African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Kigali, Rwanda. He is interested in problems in probability theory motivated by applications in computer science and social choice theory.

Bayesian models of opinion exchange are extensively studied in economics, dating back to the work of Aumann on the agreement theorem. 
An important class of such models features agents arranged on a network (representing, e.g., social interactions), with the network structure 
determining which agents communicate with each other. It is often argued that the Bayesian computations needed by agents in those models are 
difficult, but prior to our work there were no rigorous arguments for such hardness.

We consider a well-studied model where fully rational agents receive private signals indicative of an unknown state of the world. Then, they 
repeatedly announce the state of the world they consider most likely to their neighbors, at the same time updating their beliefs based on their 
neighbors' announcements.

I will discuss complexity-theoretic results establishing hardness of agents' computations in this model. Specifically, we show that these 
computations are NP-hard and extend this result to PSPACE-hardness. We show hardness not only for exact computations, but also that it is 
computationally difficult even to approximate the rational opinion in any meaningful way.

Joint work with Ali Jadbababie, Elchanan Mossel and Amin Rahimian.


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IMAGINE IF! Local Finals

Marc Gruber Vice President for Innovation at EPFL Diego Dupouy - Co-founder and CTO of Lunaphore Serge GanderCEO of CombaGroup  

IMAGINE IF! is a fantastic opportunity to accelerate a scientific idea towards a business and unlike other competitions, it is the first truly global competition for healthcare science ventures.

On December 12th we had announced the Swiss 10 finalists who entered the accelerator program. Since then, they have been working with their mentors to go forward with their project. On February 21st they will prove themselves with their first IMAGINE IF! pitching competition at the Swiss Local Finals. The Top 10 startups will compete to win:
  • 3500CHF in diluted-cash to the best startup
  • desk space in San Francisco by Swissnex
  • lab space at the Biopôle by Startlab
  • access to the Global IMAGINE IF! Finals in London for the best biotech startup
  • surprise audience prize

Join us at EPFL on Thursday 21st Februrary to discover these amazing projects. REGISTER HERE. Warming up before the pitching, Marc Gruber, Vice President for Innovation at EPFL, will be the keynote speaker on startup development for innovation. Lunaphore and CombaGroup will be joining as well, to present their work and the journey that brought them to it. We hope this will be an inspiration to our all early-stage startups and all the scientists-entrepreneurs in the crowd.

The pitching competition will host: 
  • CapAgain
  • Vesta Biosciences
  • Neurosoft
  • Aesyra
  • SenSwiss
  • Maratona Technologies *
  • Endotelix
  • Swoxid
  • Annaida Technologies
  • hiLyte

And to the confirmed jury committee the hard final decision: 
 
Good luck to the participants and don’t miss the chance to meet our speakers and all the guests at the event.
 
*note: ALAnostics Technologies has been replaced by Maratona Technologies due to reasons unrelated to the Innovation Forum association

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REGISTER HERE

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Schedule

17.10 - Registration
17.20 - Innovation Forum introduction
17.30 - Marc Gruber, Vice President for Innovation at EPFL
18.00 - Diego Dupouy, Lunaphore
18.15 - Serge Gander, CombaGroup 
18.40 - IMAGINE IF! Accelerator
18.45 - Pitching Competition
19.45 - Winners Announcement
20.00 - Networking Apero


Sponsors

Biocity
Bühler
Seed Up
Catalyze
Venturelab
Swissnex
Startlab
EPFL
Cabinet Privé de Conseils
Kellerhals Carrard
 
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CESS Seminar: About the Origin of Cities

Prof. André de Palma, ENS Cachan - University Paris-Saclay

Abstract
We provide a bare–bones framework that uncovers the circumstances which lead either to the emergence of equally-spaced and equally-sized central places or to a hierarchy of central places. We show how these patterns reflect the preferences of agents and the efficiency of transportation and communication technologies. With one population of homogeneous individuals, the economy is characterized by a uniform distribution or by a periodic distribution of central
places having the same size. The interaction between two distinct populations may give rise to a hierarchy of central places with one or several primate cities.

Bio
André de Palma is a specialist in individual (and couple) decision making under risk and uncertainty, industrial organization and operations research. He has widely published in Economics and Transportation Journals. He is the father of Dynamic models in Transportation with Moshe Ben-Akiva, Richard Arnott and Robin Lindsay. He has also introduced Discrete choice models in industrial organization : His book, Anderson, de Palma and Thisse (1992), Discrete Choice Theory of Product Differentiation, MIT Press, is used worldwide in major institutions, and has become a classic.
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Distinguished Speakers Seminar Series: Nanoscale III-V Electronics: InGaAs FinFETs and Vertical Nanowire MOSFETs

Jesús A. del Alamo, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Abstract
In the last few years, as Si electronics faces mounting difficulties to maintain its historical scaling path, III-V compound semiconductors have received a great deal of attention as possible alternatives. Sub-10 nm CMOS require high-aspect ratio 3D transistors with a fin or nanowire geometry. The enhanced degree of channel charge control of advanced 3D designs allows for transistor size scaling to extremely small dimensions. At MIT, we are investigating the prospects of nanoscale InGaAs FinFETs and vertical nanowire (VNW) MOSFETs fabricated through a top-down approach. We have demonstrated devices with sub-10 nm critical dimensions and record electrical characteristics. More recently, we have developed thermal atomic-layer etching (TALE) for InGaAs and InAlAs. We have shown that in-situ integration of TALE with atomic layer deposition of the gate dielectric allows the fabrication of the gate stack without exposure to air. This has yielded the most scaled InGaAs FinFETs to date with sub-3 nm fin widths and record ON-and OFF-state characteristics. Our studies reveal OFF-state leakage current, mobility degradation and gate oxide trapping as major stumbling blocks for future use of InGaAs 3D transistors in logic applications. This talk will review these and other problematic issues with III-V CMOS and discuss possible solutions.


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A sustainable materials system research agenda

Dr Rupert Myers, Chemical Engineering: Industrial Ecology, University of Edinburgh

Modern society is unsustainable: biodiversity loss is occurring at an unprecedented rate; anthropogenic activities dominate material cycles, putting upward pressure on resource supply; and the industrial system is forcing Earth’s climate towards the brink of a critical transition, on a scale never before experienced by humans. Facts such as these highlight the imperative for transformational change to the industrial system and also the materials basis of modern society. Traditional materials research approaches focus on improving properties and performance of individual technologies at relatively high technical detail. On the other hand, common sustainable engineering methods such as material flow analysis and life cycle assessment are used to study material and product systems at relatively low technical detail. In this talk I present a sustainable materials system research agenda. This agenda aims to address key contemporary sustainability challenges like climate change mitigation by integrating deep technical analysis of material technologies into a whole systems modelling perspective. I will focus on cement related materials such as concrete: this material is responsible for ~50% of all materials extraction and 8-9% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, yet also provides unique opportunities for beneficial use of industrial by-products and wastes.
 
References accompanying the talk
 

  1. Lothenbach, B.; Kulik, D.A.; Matschei, T.;, Balonis, M.; Baquerizo, L.; Dilnesa, B.; Miron, G.D.; Myers, R.J. Cemdata18: A chemical thermodynamics database for hydrated Portland cements and alkali-activated materials. Cem. Concr. Res., 115, 472-506 (2019).
  2. Myers, R.J.; Fishman, T.; Reck, B.K.; Graedel, T.E. Unified materials information system (UMIS): an integrated material stocks and flows data structure. J. Ind. Ecol., https://doi.org/.
  3. Fishman, T.; Myers, R.J.; Rios, O.; Graedel, T.E. Implications of emerging vehicle technologies on rare earth supply and demand in the United States. Resources, 7(1), 9 (2018).
  4. Olivetti, E.A.; Cullen, J.M. Toward a sustainable materials system. Science, 360(6396), 1396-1398 (2018).
Bio: Rupert J. Myers is a Lecturer in Chemical Engineering: Industrial Ecology at the University of Edinburgh. His scholarly journey through various engineering and science disciplines, from Melbourne to Sheffield, EMPA, Berkeley, Yale, MIT, and Edinburgh, has been driven by a mission to reduce environmental burdens through sustainable engineering. He currently champions this mission by leading University learning in industrial ecology, and by focussing his research on globally pervasive materials that are virtually unmatched in importance to society, such as cement and metals. In 2015 he was awarded the Mike Sellars Medal for best PhD thesis in the University of Sheffield’s Department of Materials Science & Engineering.
 
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IGM Colloquium: Tools and Processes for Printed Electronic Systems

Prof. Vivek Subramanian, Department of Microengineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley

Abstract:
In recent years, there has been significant interest in the applications of printed electronics in the realization of a range of low-cost, large area, flexible electronic systems such as displays, distributed sensors, and low-cost disposable tags.  To make printed electronics a viable technology, however, there is a need for significant innovations across all aspects of these systems, including realization of advanced printable materials, improvements in printing technology, and design and realization of devices and systems that exploit the capabilities of this emerging technology.
In this talk, I will review our progress in advancing the state of the art in printed electronics.  I will begin by discussing the physical underpinnings of printing and will discuss how understanding and control of printing-related phenomena allows for substantial advancement in the capabilities of the same.  I will additionally discuss advances in printable material systems that enable the realization of high-performance printed structures.  In particular, I will discuss the importance of proper material design for use as printable precursors.   Finally, I will show how the combination of advanced printed techniques with appropriate materials and proper device design may be used to realize printed devices with unprecedented performance levels, thus helping to usher in the era of printed electronics.
 
Bio:
Vivek Subramanian received his PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1998.  Since 2000, he has been at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is currently a Professor of Electrical engineering and Computer Sciences.  In 2018, Prof. Subramanian moved to École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, where he is a Professor of Microengineering.
Dr. Subramanian is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).  In 2002, he was nominated to Technology Review's list of top 100 young innovators (the TR100), and his work at Matrix Semiconductor was nominated to the Scientific American SA50 list for visionary technology.  Awards he has received include the Paul Rappaport Award for the best paper in an IEEE EDS journal, the IEEE Device Research Conference and the IMAPS best paper awards, the 2015 IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award, and the outstanding teaching award from the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley.
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High-end accelerometer platforms for demanding applications

Dr. Christophe Kergueris

Abstract: While most of the MEMS developments have been focused on low cost and low performance markets, driven by the automotive, consumer electronics and smartphone businesses, Safran Colibrys has taken up the challenge to develop medium cost and high performance MEMS inertial sensors dedicated to high reliability, harsh environment applications. A versatile accelerometer platform sensor has been developed and qualified to meet the requirements of inertial navigation, tilt measurement, vibration, and low noise acquisition, and can therefore cover the markets of aero & defence, automotive testing, railway, and structural monitoring. The presentation will provide an overview of products and markets, illustrate the MEMS design and technology and point out the key differentiators of our solutions.

Bio: Dr. Christophe Kergueris joined Safran Colibrys in 2015 as a project leader to work on the development of new MEMS products. Prior to joining Safran Colibrys, Christophe spent more than 10 years with Tronics Microsystems in various R&D positions, working on inertial and pressure sensor developments. His engineering career started at ALCATEL CIT, improving assembly processes in a production line. Christophe holds a Phd in Molecular Electronics from the University of PARIS XI (France) and an engineering degree from ESPCI in Paris.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.


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Research Data Management workshop



"From plan to action" workshop In this personalized workshop, you will check the consistency of your data management plan (DMP) and how to implement it in your lab. Before you attend the workshop, you will need to fill a form about your current practices. If you are not familiar with research data management already, we suggest that you register to our introduction course.
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Gaussian process optimization with simulation failures

Dr. François Bachoc

We address the optimization of a computer model, where each simulation either fails or returns a valid output performance. We suggest a joint Gaussian process model for classification of the inputs (computation failure or success) and for regression of the performance function. We discuss the maximum likelihood estimation of the covariance parameters, with a stochastic approximation of the gradient. We then extend the celebrated expected improvement criterion to our setting of joint classification and regression, thus obtaining a global optimization algorithm. We prove the convergence of this algorithm. We also study its practical performances, on simulated data, and on a real computer model in the context of automotive fan design.


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Human Autonomy through Robotics Autonomy

Prof. Brenna Argall Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, IL, USA and Shirley Ryan AbilityLab (former Rehablitation Institute of Chicago), Chicago, IL, USA

It is a paradox that often the more severe a person's motor impairment, the more assistance they require and yet the less able they are to operate the very assistive machines created provide this assistance. A primary aim of my lab is to address this confound by incorporating robotics autonomy and intelligence into assistive machines---to offload some of the control burden from the user. Robots already synthetically sense, act in and reason about the world, and these technologies can be leveraged to help bridge the gap left by sensory, motor or cognitive impairments in the users of assistive machines. However, here the human-robot team is a very particular one: the robot is physically supporting or attached to the human, replacing or enhancing lost or diminished function. In this case getting the allocation of control between the human and robot right is absolutely essential, and will be critical for the adoption of physically assistive robots within larger society. This talk will overview some of the ongoing projects and studies in my lab, whose research lies at the intersection of artificial intelligence, rehabilitation robotics and machine learning. We are working with a range of hardware platforms, including smart wheelchairs and assistive robotic arms. A distinguishing theme present within many of our projects is that the machine automation is customizable---to a
user's unique and changing physical abilities, personal preferences or even financial means.
 


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Systems Engineering and Design of a Mars Polar Life Research Base

Anne-Marlene Rüede

Mars’ ice caps hold the secret to the planet's climate, hydrological processes and is a likely place to contain traces of life, should they exist. A crewed mission to the surface of Mars, with the objective of drilling into the Northern ice cap and analysing the samples in-situ would therefore advance our knowledge of the formation of planets and the prevalence of life in the Solar System. Furthermore, because the North Polar region provides an easy access to water ice, this area has the potential of sustaining a long-term human presence. This talk will propose the design of a crewed mission with high technology readiness level, using a systems engineering approach and scenario testing, and discusses the opportunities offered by the Space Launch System vehicle, deployable structures and the inclusion of water ice into the life support system. The need for a crane system between Mars’ orbit and surface will also be discussed.

Anne-Marlene Rüede is a recent graduate from the Swiss Polytechnic Federal Institute in Lausanne. She has majored in Architecture and Space technologies with the objective of becoming a space and extreme environments architect. She has worked on various projects, from the design and model of a six unit CubeSat, which is now part of the permanent exhibition in the Swiss embassy in China, to mission scenario and architecture of Mars missions with crew. She has also worked on transportation systems on Earth and in space, such as crane systems in Mars orbit.

Dr. Anton B. Ivanov has been recently (2017) appointed as the Director of the Space Center at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Moscow, Russia. This work was initiated when Dr. Ivanov was Scientist with the EPFL Space Center. He is currently the project manager for the CubETH CubeSat project, study leader for the CHEOPS satellite and was responsible for the Minor in Space Technologies EPFL. After receiving his PhD in Planetary Science from Caltech in 2000, Dr Ivanov joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to contribute to Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express and Mars Science Laboratory projects. From 2007 until 2017, Dr. Ivanov was a scientist with the EPFL Space Center and the Swiss Space Center.

Claudio Leonardi is the head of the Clip-Air project at the Swiss Polytechnic Federal Institute in Lausanne (EPFL) since 2009, and is in charge of the architecture, the structure and the management of the project. He also manages coordination and development in the fields covered by the Clip-Air project: transportation, modular logistics, mechanics, structure, architecture. Claudio Leonardi has already been involved in a number of major projects, including Solar Impulse. He has also collaborated with Yves Rossy aka Jetman.

Tatiana Volkova is an aerospace engineer & space architect and graduated from Bauman Moscow Technical University and Ecole Polytechnique Paris. Tatiana's personal goal is to drive the growth of innovation in the field of architecture in extreme conditions and is passionate about habitat design overall efficiency. She is currently conducting her PhD research at the Swiss Polytechnic Federal Institute in Lausanne (EPFL) in the field of architecture in the extreme environments. 
 


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Programmable Smart Bio-Inspired Sponges

Prof. Omar K. Farha
Department of Chemistry,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, USA

ChE-605 - Highlights in Energy Research seminar series
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging class of solid-state materials built up from metal-based nodes and organic linkers. They exhibit permanent porosity and unprecedented surface areas which can be readily tuned through coordination chemistry at the inorganic node and/or organic chemistry at the linkers. The high porosities, tunability, and stability are highly attractive in the context of catalysis. As exemplified by many catalytic enzyme assemblies in nature, site-isolation is a powerful strategy for performing catalytic reactions. MOFs provide an exciting platform for deploying catalysts in a site-isolated fashion and the cavities surrounding them can be engineered to conceptually mimic enzymes. This talk will address new advances in the synthesis and catalytic activity of MOF/Enzyme composite materials developed at Northwestern University.
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CESS Seminar: Liquefaction of fully and nearly saturated granular soils, experimental investigations and theoretical approach

Prof. Waldemar Świdziński, Director of the Institute of Hydro-Engineering, Polish Academy of Sciences in Gdańsk, Geomechanical Department

Abstract
Liquefaction is one of the most spectacular phenomena of soil behaviour during which granular soil changes its properties from solid to liquid-like type.  Due to its disastrous character, it has been a subject of investigations carried out by various researchers from many countries over many years. Although the basic factors governing the liquefaction phenomenon are quite well recognised, there are still some gaps requiring further studies and analyses. One of them is related to the degree of saturation of soils, which may be prone to liquefaction. For many years it was believed that one of compulsory conditions for soils to liquefy is  full saturation. Recent investigations have shown that it may not be necessarily true. The second aspect, which requires further investigations, regards the content of fines fraction in the granular composition of the soil susceptible to the liquefaction process. Furthermore, the last but not least, a following question should be answered: may some types of rock undergo liquefaction as well? In the course of the presentation, some fundamental issues describing the liquefaction phenomenon, based on the results of experimental investigations carried out in various geotechnical laboratory devices (simple shear, standard, cyclic and true triaxial apparatuses) will be shown and discussed. Moreover, the proposed theoretical description of pore water generation during monotonic and cyclic loading for fully saturated as well as partially saturated granular soils will be presented.
 
Bio
Professor Waldemar Świdziński has been working at the Institute of Hydro-Engineering, Polish Academy of Sciences in Gdańsk, Geomechanical Department since 1981. At the Institute he obtained his PhD in Soil Mechanics in 1988. After that, he got a Postdoc position in the Geotechnical Laboratory at Delft Technical University, the Netherlands, where he spent over one year. Furthermore, he was awarded D.Sc. at the Technical University of Gdańsk in 2007 and became a Professor of the Institute in the same year. For many years he had been the head of the Geomechanical Department. Since 2016 he is a Director of the Institute. His main scientific interest is focused on mechanics of soil compaction and liquefaction, modeling the response of soil subjected to monotonic or cyclic loadings including earthquakes, stability analyses, dynamic analyses, experimental soil mechanics, as well as large scale modeling of groundwater flow and pollution transport. Prof. Świdziński obtained essential experimental, numerical and practical geotechnical engineering experience. Since 1984 to date, he is an expert for Tailings Storage Facility belonging to KGHM Polska Miedź S.A., one of the largest facilities of this type in the world, being an essential inspiration for many research problems. Throughout the years he has published more than 100 papers, 20 of which in well recognized, peer-review international journals.
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Toward Point-of-Care Assessment of Hemostasis Using Miniaturized Dielectric Coagulometry

Prof. Dr. Pedram Mohseni
Case Western Reserve University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/204283294

Abstract: Point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices hold great promise to significantly impact healthcare delivery and address health disparities by shifting the focus away from the utilization of high-cost specialized care for the treatment of late-stage diseases toward predictive, preventative, and personalized health for more effective disease monitoring and management. In the developed world, POC technologies are expected to offer effective and feasible means of reducing healthcare costs and improving patient care, whereas in the developing world POC technologies are urgently needed to address pressing healthcare needs with affordable and accessible solutions.
In this lecture, I will first provide a brief overview of the field of POC technologies for health diagnostics. To showcase an example, I will next present our work on ClotChip, a microfluidic sensor that utilizes dielectric spectroscopy for POC assessment of blood coagulation disorders with <10 uL of whole blood. Specifically, I will analyze a simple circuit model that accurately captures the frequency-dependent dielectric behavior of human whole blood placed within a microfluidic channel. I will then discuss how temporal variation in the dielectric properties of the blood sample undergoing coagulation provides information about molecular and cellular abnormalities in the hemostatic process.
Finally, to establish the utility of ClotChip as a platform technology for POC assessment of hemostasis, I will share our results from pilot clinical studies with ClotChip on monitoring anticoagulation therapy with a new class of FDA-approved blood thinners as well as coagulation factor replacement therapy in hemophilia care management. Results from correlative studies between ClotChip and several existing blood coagulation assays are also provided.

Bio: Pedram Mohseni received the B.S. degree from the Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1996, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, all in electrical engineering, in 1999 and 2005, respectively. Currently, he is a Professor and Associate Chair in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA, with a secondary appointment in the Biomedical Engineering Department. His research interests include analog/mixed-signal/RF integrated circuits and microsystems for neural engineering, wireless sensing/actuating systems for brain-machine interfaces, interface circuits for micro/nano-scale sensors/actuators, and point-of-care diagnostic platforms for personalized health. Dr. Mohseni has been an Associate Editor for several IEEE journals since 2008, as well as a member of the Technical Program Committee (TPC) of the IEEE RFIC Symposium (2012-2015), CICC (2012-present), and ISSCC (2017-present). The author of two book chapters, six issued and pending patents, and over 105 refereed technical and scientific articles, he has received several awards including the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Case School of Engineering Research Award, first-place prize of the Medical Device Entrepreneur’s Forum at the 58th annual conference of the ASAIO, and EECS Mihajlo “Mike” Mesarovic Award for Extraordinary Impact. He has been a member of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits, Circuits and Systems, and Engineering in Medicine and Biology Societies, as well as the administrative committee of the IEEE Sensors Council (2014-2017). Dr. Mohseni was the TPC co-Chair of the IEEE BioCAS conference in 2017 and General co-Chair of the conference in 2018.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Using DNA Origami to Decipher Spatial Effects in Biology

Prof. Björn Hogberg, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (SE)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
It is widely accepted that the biophysical context of ligands and receptors has significant impact of downstream signaling, however the concept is poorly understood due to difficulties in controlling and analyzing the microenvironment on the nanoscale. I will talk about how we think that DNA-nanotechnology can be of great help in both learning the tactile alphabet of cells by stimulation using protein decorated DNA-origami ‘nano-calipers’ and of help in understanding the binding of antibodies. I will also briefly present our recent work on ‘3D-printing’ DNA origami wireframe structures, a method that provides a way to make origami more accessible to experiments in physiological salt conditions.

Bio:
Björn Högberg is a professor of molecular systems biophysics and head of the Division of Biomaterials at the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics at Karolinska Institutet. He is a Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation Academy Fellow and an ERC Consolidator grantee.
Högberg’s research is focused on developing new methods and molecular tools for cell biology research using DNA devices, mainly DNA nanotechnology and DNA origami. His focus has been both in development of the basic technology and in applications to probe and manipulate cell signaling by cell surface receptor clustering. His research also involve using these devices for drug delivery in cancer.
Högberg earned his MSc in Physics at Uppsala University and did his PhD in Physics both at Chalmers University, where he started, and at Mid Sweden University where he graduated in 2007. After that he joined the lab of William Shih as a post-doc at Harvard Medical School and Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, USA. He joined Karolinska Institutet in 2010 as an Assistant Professor at the dept. of Neuroscience and now holds a faculty positon at the dept. of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
 

 
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Nano-Phononics and Nano-Photonics with Semiconductor Nanowires

Dr Marta De Luca, Department of Physics, University of Basel

If the capability to control photons and electrons in crystals has brought to an astonishing level of knowledge as well as to extraordinary technological achievements, the manipulation of phonons is still quite unexplored, despite it holds the promise of a quantum-mechanical control of heat transport [1]. The quantum-mechanical behavior of phonons may also enable the realization of coherent phonon transport via phonon engineering. Nanostructures, such as semiconducting nanowires (NWs), are an ideal platform for Nano-phononics, since they offer the possibility to modify to a large extent the phonon properties by enabling the formation of different kinds of heterostructures and superlattices. I will discuss advanced methods based on Raman spectroscopy to determine the crystalline and phononic properties of nanoscale heterostructures [2] and show how the number of phonons modes can be decided à la carte by tuning the superlattice period in NWs [3].
In the second part of the talk, I will focus on the optical properties of III-V NWs and their dependence on crystal structure useful for band-gap engineering [4]. I will also introduce the open challenges in Nano-photonics and present the new research line I am starting in Basel, aimed at developing a new approach for embedding site-controlled quantum dots in NWs. Dots-in-NWs with high brightness and high light extraction efficiency can be the solid-state building blocks of novel photonic crystals and photonic circuits, and open new paths in quantum communication.
 
References
[1] M. Maldovan, Nature 503, 209, (2013).
[2] C. Fasolato, M. De Luca, D. Djomani, et al., “Crystalline, Phononic, and Electronic Properties of Heterostructured Polytypic Ge Nanowires by Raman Spectroscopy”. Nano Letters 18, 7075 (2018).
[3] M. De Luca, C. Fasolato, M. A. Verheijen, et al., “Phononic properties à la carte in twinning superlattice GaP nanowires”, under review (2019).
[4] M. De Luca and A. Polimeni, “Electronic properties of wurtzite-phase InP nanowires determined by optical and magneto-optical spectroscopy”, Applied Physics Reviews 4, 041102 (2017).
Bio: Dr. Marta De Luca has just started an Ambizione grant funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation in the Physics Department of the University of Basel (Switzerland). Previously, she was post-doc for three years in the same university in the Nanophononics group, where she has investigated phonon engineering in low-dimensional systems. Dr. De Luca graduated in Physics in 2011 at Sapienza University of Rome (Italy) and obtained the Ph.D. in Materials Science in 2014 from the same university. During the Ph.D. she investigated the optical and magneto-optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, for which she was awarded the “Piero Brovetto Prize” by the Italian Society of Physics.


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IGM Colloquium: Mesostructured Semiconductor Oxides for Solar Energy Conversion

Prof. Roland Marschall, Physical Chemistry III, University of Bayreuth, Germany

Abstract:
Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical processes with stable oxide materials still lack the efficiency to justify industrial application, mainly due to insufficient light absorption, short charge carrier lifetimes, or dominant recombination. The presentation will present strategies including mesostructuring of complex semiconductor mixed oxide materials on the nanoscale to improve photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical activity for H2 generation and water splitting. Mesoporous and fibroid photocatalysts exhibit shortened charge carrier diffusion lengths and enhanced surface area for improved photocatalytic performance, while the design of composite photocatalysts improves charge carrier separation for enhanced activity. Spinel ferrite nanostructures combine broad light absorption and earth-abundant materials design.
 
Some Recent References
Adv. Funct. Mater. 24 (2014) 2421; Small 11 (2015) 2051; Adv. Energy Mater. 6 (2016) 1600208 (1-9); Nano Energy 31 (2017) 551; J. Phys. Chem. C 121 (2017) 27126; J. Mater. Chem. A 6 (2018) 1971; Nanoscale 10 (2018) 3225; Nanoscale 10 (2018) 9691; ACS Appl. Energy Mater. 1 (2018) 2520; Chem. Phys. Chem. 19 (2018) 2313; Chem. Photo. Chem 2 (2018) 1022; ACS Appl. Energy Mater. 1 (2018) 5787
 
 
Bio:
Roland Marschall obtained his PhD in Physical Chemistry from the Leibniz University Hannover in 2008, working on mesoporous materials for fuel cell applications. After a one year postdoctoral research at the University of Queensland in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, he joined in 2010 the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC as project leader. In 2011, he joined the Industrial Chemistry Laboratory at Ruhr-University Bochum as young researcher. In 07/2013, he became Emmy-Noether Young Investigator at the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen. Since 08/2018, he is full professor at the University of Bayreuth. His current research interests are heterogeneous photocatalysis, especially photocatalytic water splitting using semiconductor mixed oxides, and synthesis of oxidic mesostructured materials for renewable energy applications.
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IGM Colloquium: Mesostructured Semiconductor Oxides for Solar Energy Conversion

Prof. Roland Marschall, Physical Chemistry III, University of Bayreuth, Germany

Abstract:
Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical processes with stable oxide materials still lack the efficiency to justify industrial application, mainly due to insufficient light absorption, short charge carrier lifetimes, or dominant recombination. The presentation will present strategies including mesostructuring of complex semiconductor mixed oxide materials on the nanoscale to improve photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical activity for H2 generation and water splitting. Mesoporous and fibroid photocatalysts exhibit shortened charge carrier diffusion lengths and enhanced surface area for improved photocatalytic performance, while the design of composite photocatalysts improves charge carrier separation for enhanced activity. Spinel ferrite nanostructures combine broad light absorption and earth-abundant materials design.
 
Some Recent References
Adv. Funct. Mater. 24 (2014) 2421; Small 11 (2015) 2051; Adv. Energy Mater. 6 (2016) 1600208 (1-9); Nano Energy 31 (2017) 551; J. Phys. Chem. C 121 (2017) 27126; J. Mater. Chem. A 6 (2018) 1971; Nanoscale 10 (2018) 3225; Nanoscale 10 (2018) 9691; ACS Appl. Energy Mater. 1 (2018) 2520; Chem. Phys. Chem. 19 (2018) 2313; Chem. Photo. Chem 2 (2018) 1022; ACS Appl. Energy Mater. 1 (2018) 5787
 
 
Bio:
Roland Marschall obtained his PhD in Physical Chemistry from the Leibniz University Hannover in 2008, working on mesoporous materials for fuel cell applications. After a one year postdoctoral research at the University of Queensland in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, he joined in 2010 the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC as project leader. In 2011, he joined the Industrial Chemistry Laboratory at Ruhr-University Bochum as young researcher. In 07/2013, he became Emmy-Noether Young Investigator at the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen. Since 08/2018, he is full professor at the University of Bayreuth. His current research interests are heterogeneous photocatalysis, especially photocatalytic water splitting using semiconductor mixed oxides, and synthesis of oxidic mesostructured materials for renewable energy applications.
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Gabriel Nuñez // Microbiota-Host Interactions in Health and Disease

Gabriel Nuñez, Department of Pathology and Rogel Cancer Center, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.

The mechanisms that allow enteric pathogens to colonize the intestine in the presence of the microbiota and how host immunity and the indigenous microbiota regulate pathogen colonization remain poorly understood. Our laboratory is using Citrobacter rodentium, a mouse pathogen that models human infections by enteropathogenic E. coli, to understand the mechanisms that regulate the colonization and clearance of the pathogen in the gut.  These studies have revealed how the pathogen colonizes and replicates successfully early during infection and how host immunity and the indigenous microbiota cooperate to eradicate the pathogen in the later stage of the infection. These studies have also revealed that Clostridia species protect the host from colonization by C. rodentium and Salmonella enterica in the intestine. In addition to their protective role, bacterial symbionts can also induce inflammatory disorders such as Crohn’s disease in genetically susceptible individuals. We will show and discuss new results that demonstrate that particular symbiotic bacteria can accumulate in the intestine to trigger Crohn’s disease-like colitis in mice with mutations relevant to the development of inflammatory bowel disease in humans.


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Find your internship in 180 seconds



Students from all sections, come and see us, be curious, all these companies are likely to engage you! 

To EPFL master's students looking for an internship for 2019 - 4 to 6 months available from July to September 2019 - you will be able to discover at a glance a choice of internships in 180 seconds! A dozen national and international companies based at EPFL Innovation Park will pitch and present their internship(s) offers in 3 minutes.

The event will be fun and dynamic! After the presentations, students will have the opportunity to network and meet the managers, engineers and internship supervisors. 

Pizzas will be served.

Join us on Wednesday, March 6, 2019 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Auditorium CO 2
The presentations will be in English.
Admission is free but registration is mandatory for organizational reasons.
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Research Data Management workshop



"From plan to action" workshop In this personalized workshop, you will check the consistency of your data management plan (DMP) and how to implement it in your lab. Before you attend the workshop, you will need to fill a form about your current practices. If you are not familiar with research data management already, we suggest that you register to our introduction course.
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Ansys EPFL on March 7h 2019 - Room CM1 103, at 13H00

CADFEM Academics Switzerland

Free workshop
Simulation of multiple physics in ANSYS
At EPFL on March 7h 2019 - Room CM1 103, at 13H00Learn how to use simulation to accelerate your research with real situation examples with the most recent ANSYS simulation tools in multiple physics. This workshop is in two parts.
Part I: Introduction to ANSYS Multiphysics
  • Structural analysis
  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
  • Electromagnetics (EM) - low (LF) and high frequency (HF)
  • Thermal analysis
  • Acoustics
  • Coupled physics
  • ANSYS Discovery Live
  • ANSYS Additive Manufacturing
Part II: Workshops
The room is equipped with PCs. Each participant can choose several of the following examples and calculate them on PC under the supervision of a CADFEM's expert:
  • Structural: Watchmaker’s spring, can crush, machine-tools
  • Acoustics: Muffler
  • Electromagnetics & thermal: Inductive heating, antenna
  • CFD: T-pipe, AIM (Rear Spoiler)
  • Coupled physics: Piezoelectric fan, thermal-Structural, AIM (Soldering iron, Butterfly valve)
Register now!
(This workshop is free but registration is mandatory).
CADFEM Academics Switzerland
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Supramolecular Antivirals

Prof. Francesco Stellacci, EPFL, Lausanne (CH)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
Viral infections are among the main causes of death in the world. When prevention is not an option, antiviral drugs are the last resort to prevent the spread and the mortality of these infections. There are only a few effective drugs on the market, for the most part they prevent intracellular viral replication. Unfortunately, they are too few when compared to the many viruses that threaten humans.
In this talk, I will show a new design rule to achieve drugs that fight viruses extracellularly by irreversibly inhibiting their infectivity, i.e. I will show how to create virucidal compounds. The design of these macromolecular virucidal agents starts by a bio-mimic approach and is characterized by the limited toxicity towards host cells that one would expect from such compounds. Yet, I will demonstrate that the multivalent binding to the viruses, coupled with a large hydrophobic contact between the compounds and the virus leads to a loss of integrity of the virion that obviously leads to an irreversible loss of infectivity. Results in and ex-vivo will be illustrated especially for the cases of influenza, herpes, and respiratory syncytial virus.

Bio:
Prof. Francesco Stellacci got his degree in Materials Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano in 1998 with Prof. Zerbi. He then moved as a post-doc with Prof. J.W. Perry in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Arizona. In 2002 he became as assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT (Cambridge, USA). There he became associate professor with tenure in 2009. In 2010, he moved as a full professor to EPFL where he holds the Constellium Chair. Stellacci has published more than 130 papers and has more than 15 patent applications. He has won numerous awards, among the Technology Review TR35 ’top innovator under 35’, the Popular Science Magazine ’Brilliant 10’, and the EMRS EU40. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, of the Global Young Academy, and of the European Academy of Sciences.
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Free electrons to molecular bonds and back – The dark side of solar fuels and solar chemicals

Prof. Peter Strasser, Chemical Engineering Division, Technical University Berlin

In this talk, I will highlight some of our recent advances in the field of direct electrochemical reduction of CO2 into value‐added fuels and chemicals on metallic Cu‐based catalysts and nonmetallic carbon‐based MNC electrocatalysts with molecularly‐defined coordinative MNx metal‐nitrogen centers as active sites. Special focus will be placed on efficient production of CO at lab‐scale and industrial current densities with emphasis on a fundamental understanding of between selectivity and the nature of the MNx moiety. Furthermore, the design of hybrid electrocatalysts consisting of CO‐efficient MNC backbones decorated with
CuOx nanoparticles will be addressed and the molecular mechanisms of their enhanced ethylene production discussed.

Bio: Peter Strasser is a Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and the Head of the Electrochemical Catalysis, Energy, and Materials Science Laboratory at the Technical University of Berlin. His research interests include the fundamental aspects between heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, and the electrochemical aspects of energy storage, energy conversion, and solar fuel production devices. In 2018, he received the Sir William Grove Award for his achievements and leadership in electrochemistry by the International Association of Hydrogen Energy.


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Specialized Master's Day 2019



EPFL organizes every year a Specialized Master’s Day to present these programs more specifically to interested students. In 2019 this day will be organized on Tuesday March 12th, in the SG Hall. After each presentation, a snack will be offered to the participants.

Program:

From 12:00 to 18:00, presentations and information booths will give you the opportunity to get more information and meet staff from the following programs:

  •     Energy Science and Technology
  •     Nuclear Engineering
  •     Financial Engineering
  •     Management, Technology & Entrepreneurship
  •     Computational Science & Engineering
  •     Digital Humanities
  •     Micro and Nanotechnologies for integrated systems

Please register here.
 
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IGM Colloquium: Interfacing nature’s catalytic machinery with synthetic materials for semi-artificial photosynthesis

Prof. Erwin Reisner, Department of Chemistry at University of Cambridge

Semi-artificial photosynthesis interfaces biological catalysts with synthetic materials and aims to overcome the limitations of natural and artificial photosynthesis. (1) It also provides an underexplored strategy to study the functionality of biological catalysts on synthetic scaffolds through a range of techniques. This presentation will summarise our progress in integrating biocatalysts in bespoke hierarchical 3D electrode scaffolds and photoelectrochemical circuits. (2) We will first discuss the fundamental insights gained into the function of the water oxidation Photosystem II, where (i) unnatural charge transfer pathways have been revealed at the enzyme-electrode interface, and (ii) O2 reduction that short-circuit the water-oxidation process has been discovered. (3-4)
The wiring of Photosystem II to a H2 evolving hydrogenase or a CO2 reducing formate dehydrogenase has subsequently enabled the in vitro re-engineering of natural photosynthetic pathways. We have assembled efficient H2 evolution and CO2 reduction systems that are driven by enzymatic water oxidation using semi-artificial Z-scheme architectures. (5-8) In contrast to natural photosynthesis, these photoelectrochemical cells allow panchromic light absorption by using complementary biotic and abiotic light absorbers. As opposed to low-yielding metabolic pathways, the electrochemical circuit provides effective electronic communication without losses to competing side-reactions. Progress in the integration of robust live cyanobacteria in 3D structured electrodes will also be discussed. (9)

References
(1) Kornienko et al., Nature Nanotech., 2018, 13, 890–899
(2) Mersch et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2015, 137, 8541–8549
(3) Zhang et al., Nature Chem. Biol., 2016, 12, 1046–1052
(4) Kornienko et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2018, 140, 17923–17931
(5) Sokol et al., Nature Energy, 2018, 3, 944–951
(6) Nam et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2018, 57, 10595–10599
(7) Sokol et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2018, 140, 16418–16422
(8) Miller et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2019, in press (DOI: 10.1002/anie.201814419)
(9) Zhang et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2018, 140, 6–9
 
Bio:
Erwin Reisner received his education and professional training at the University of Vienna (PhD in 2005 and Habilitation in 2010), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (postdoc from 2005-2007) and the University of Oxford (postdoc from 2008-2009). He joined the University of Cambridge as a University Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry and as a Fellow of St. John’s College in 2010. He became the head of the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Sustainable SynGas Chemistry in 2012, was appointed to Reader in 2015, and his current position as Professor of Energy and Sustainability in 2017. His laboratory explores chemical biology, synthetic chemistry, materials science, and engineering relevant to the development of solar-driven processes for the sustainable synthesis of fuels and chemicals. He acts as the Principal Investigator of the Cambridge Centre for Circular Economy Approaches to Eliminate Plastic Waste and director of the UK Solar Fuels Network, where he promotes and coordinates the national activities in artificial photosynthesis.


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Challenges in Smart Sensor Systems

Lucas Tschuor

Abstract: The trend towards integration of microsensors in a broad variety of devices and contexts is flourishing. This trend results in abundant product innovations striving to bring value to applications. Many of these innovations are dominantly triggered by progress in sensor miniaturization. In particular, monolithic sensor systems comprising the sensor element and signal processing on a single chip provide high functional densities. The challenges for the innovation and development of such smart sensor systems and examples for their implementation in cutting-edge applications are illustrated.
 
Bio: Mr. Lucas Tschuor is Head of Field Application Engineering at Sensirion. He has joint Sensirion in 2012 and gained extensive experience in sensor technology and customer engineering for a wide range of markets such as automotive, medical and consumer business. He has a strong background in innovation, project and customer management and his interest spans from emerging technologies to novel applications. He received a master degree in electrical engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) Lausanne in 2005. After his master degree he focused on the European Startup Network and build up a startup company in Madrid, Spain followed by a position as R&D Engineer at Siemens. He was also a lecturer in microcontroller programming at the National University of Singapore.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.


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EPFL SoOpen 2019



During this day, we will present different techniques and tools that will help you fully embrace the Open Science Way when writing scientific code.
In the morning you will be able to follow three ex-cathedra presentations, whereas in the afternoon we are organizing a workshop. We have alimited number of places for the workshop.

For researchers writing code, in order to learn to

  • use versioning
  • document your software
  • share your code with others
  • easily reuse what you have created
  • publish your work and make it useful for the scientific community
  • have larger impact throught code publication

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Designing Cell-Based Treatment Strategies of the Future

Prof. Martin Fussenegger, ETH Zürich, Basel (CH)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
Since Paracelsus’ (1493-1541) definition that the dose makes the drug, the basic treatment strategies have largely remained unchanged. Following diagnosis of a disease the doctor prescribes specific doses of small-molecule drugs or protein pharmaceuticals which interfere with disease-associated molecular targets. However, this treatment concept lacks any diagnostic feedback, prophylactic impact and dynamic dosage regimen. We have pioneered the concept of metabolic prostheses which, akin to mechanical prosthesis replacing defective body parts, interface with host metabolism to detect and correct metabolic disorders. Metabolic prostheses consist of designer cells containing synthetic sensor-effector gene networks which detect critical levels of disease metabolites, processes pathological input with Boolean logic and fine-tune in-situ production and release of protein therapeutics in a seamless, self-sufficient and closed-loop manner. When implanted inside insulated, immunoprotective and autovascularizing microcontainers the metabolic prostheses connect to the bloodstream, constantly monitor the levels of disease-associated metabolites and trigger an immediate therapeutic response to prevent, attenuate or correct the disease. With their unique characteristic to dynamically link diagnosis to dose-specific in-situ production and delivery of protein pharmaceuticals, metabolic protheses will enable new treatment strategies in the future. To highlight the impact of synthetic biology on future biomedical applications, we will present our latest generation of remote-controlled gene switches, biosensor circuits and metabolic prostheses tailored to diagnose, prevent and cure high-prevalence medical conditions including diabetes, cancer, pain, and multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacterica.
 
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Nanoscale amorphous precursors and their phase transitions in diverse biominerals

Prof. Pupa Gilbert, Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison USA

Crystallization by particle attachment (CPA)1 of amorphous precursors has been demonstrated in
biominerals formed by several animals. Precisely the same precursors phases, hydrated (ACCH2O)
and anhydrous calcium carbonate (ACC), have been observed spectromicroscopically in 3
diverse phyla: echinoderms2, molluscs3, and cnidarians4 (Figure 1). This is surprising because
these groups diverged from one another long before they evolved their characteristic body plans
and capacity for skeletal biomineralization. How far back in time does this biomineralization
strategy go, and why? Can we harness it for 3D printing or other useful materials synthesis?
1 JJ De Yoreo, PUPA Gilbert, NAJM Sommerdijk, RL Penn, S Whitelam, D Joester, H Zhang, JD Rimer, A
Navrotsky, JF Banfield, AF Wallace, FM Michel, FC Meldrum, H Cölfen, PM Dove. Crystallization by
particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments. Science 349, aaa6760 (2015).
2 YUT Gong, CE Killian, IC Olson, NP Appathurai, AL Amasino, MC Martin, LJ Holt, FH Wilt, PUPA Gilbert.
Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate. Proc Natl Acad Sci 109, 6088-6093
(2012).
3 RT DeVol, C-Y Sun, MA Marcus, SN Coppersmith, SCB Myneni, PUPA Gilbert. Nanoscale Transforming
Mineral Phases in Fresh Nacre. J Am Chem Soc 137, 13325-13333 (2015).
4 T Mass, AJ Giuffre, C-Y Sun, CA Stifler, MJ Frazier, M Neder, N Tamura, CV Stan, MA Marcus, PUPA
Gilbert. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons. Procs Natl Acad Sci 114, E7670-
E7678 (2017).
Bio: Pupa Gilbert got her doctoral degree in Physics in 1987 in Rome, Italy. She was a staff scientist at the Italian CNR and the EPFL before going to the US as a professor of physics at UW-Madison in 1999. She is a physicist with a burning passion for biology and materials science, and she studies biominerals, their structure, and formation mechanisms with the synchrotron spectromicroscopy methods she developed.
 


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Lecture Demonstrations in the age of YouTube

Ilya Eigenbrot

Demonstrations have been used to make lectures more interesting and accessible for a very long time – but is there any point in investing time and effort into demonstrations in the age of smartphones and instant YouTube clips? This workshop will discuss this question, as well as give practical tips on designing and using demonstrations in different settings. You will also get the chance to design one or more demos relevant to your own area of teaching expertise. Facilitated by Ilya Eigenbrot with 20 year experience in the popularisation of science.


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Engineering Industry Day

Session1: Engineering for life science and health Bart Deplancke – Laboratory of systems biology and genetics Francesco Petrini– Bertarelli Chair in Translational Neuroengineering Diego Ghezzi – Medtronic chair in neuroengineering Sebastian Maerkl – Lab. of biological network characterization Hatice Altug – Bionanophotonic systems lab. Matteo dal Peraro – Laboratory for biomolecular modeling LBM Session 2: Robotics and Manufacturing Auke Ijspeert – Biorobotics lab. Vivek Subramanian – Subramanian group Yves Bellouard – Galatea lab. Selman Sakar – Microbiorobotic systems lab. Jamie Paik – Reconfigurable robotics lab. Guillermo Villanueva – Advanced nanomechanical systems lab Session 3: Data enabled Engineering Volkan Cevher – Lab. for information and interference systems Jean-Philippe Thiran– Signal processing lab. 5 Denis Gillet – Coordination & Intercation Systems Group REACT Dimitri Van de Ville – Medical image processing lab. Andreas Burg – Telecommunications Circuits Laboratory Session 4: Materials and Processes Fabien Sorin – Lab. of photonic materials and fibre devices John Kolinski– Engineering Mechanics of Soft Interfaces Esther Amstad – Soft materials lab. Pedro Reis – Flexible structures lab. Yves Leterrier – Laboratory for Processing of Advanced Composites

Innovation is one of the basic missions of EPFL and of primary importance to the School of Engineering (STI). After 2 successful editions with over 150 attending companies, we are organising the 3rd edition if the industry day on Wednesday March 20 2019. It offers different opportunities to companies, research laboratories of EPFL, as well as Master and PhD students.
For companies

  • Get informed about the state of research at EPFL
  • Meet professors, PhD students and master students
  • Initiate collaborations to foster innovation in your company
  • Present your company to students and researchers
For researchers
  • Present your research to companies
  • Invite your past and current industry partners
  • Meet with potential future industry partners and discuss collaboration opportunities
  • Take advantage of organised discussions, informal networking, and information booths
  • Establish a network for the professional integration of PhD students and postdoctoral researchers
For Master and PhD students
  • Find out about research and development in industry
  • Learn about innovation and entrepreneurship at EPFL
  • Meet potential host companies for internships, master theses in industry or future employement
In addition to the plenary presentations from industry and academia, the industry day features a technical exhibition for companies, startups, research laboratories and institutions supporting innovation. The exihinition is paired with the Salon des Technologies STIL on 2 consecutive days.
The program allows for more than four hours of networking time in the exhibition and catering space during breaks, as well as face-to-face meetings between companies and research laboratories.
We hope to that everyone will find a high motivation to come to the Swisstech Convention Center on Wednesday March 20, 2019 and we are looking forward to presenting you an interesting program
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to be announced

Prof. Ivan Martin, University of Basel (CH)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Molecular insight in fracture of soft materials

Prof. Costantin Creton, Soft Matter Science and Engineering Laboratory, ESPCI ParisTech

Fracture of soft materials is a complex process coupling non linear mechanics and statistical physics[1]. Because of the large deformations involved before a crack propagates, molecular damage typically occurs in the bulk of the material and not only in the fracture plane[2]. This is particularly true for tough soft materials where bulk energy dissipation mechanisms such as sacrificial bonds are introduced by design. Until recently the detection of damage ahead of a crack was limited to the detection of crystallization or cavitation, detectable by wide or small angle X-ray scattering or optical visualisation, but molecular bond scission was not directly detectable. However organic chemists have now developed several molecules that respond to applied forces or bond scission by changing their light absorption or emission properties[3] providing novel opportunities for materials scientists to gain insight in molecular processes occurring during mechanical loading.
We have incorporated mechanosensitive molecules as crosslinkers in model transparent soft polymer networks containing sacrificial bonds and used them to detect and map stresses and molecular damages before and during crack propagation. Spyropyran can be used to detect stresses in real time and to distinguish loaded regions from unloaded ones. Dioxetane based molecules emit light when they break and can be used to obtain time resolved information on the bond scission process and pi-extended anthracene can be used to obtain high resolution spatial information. A combination of several techniques is needed to investigate the temporal and spatial process of damage in soft and tough materials in order to develop proper molecular models and guide the design of novel materials. We will focus on the mechanisms occurring during crack propagation and necking of multiple network elastomers where a stiff and highly stretched network is embedded in a more extensible matrix{Millereau, 2018 #5305} .
References
[1]        C. Creton, M. Ciccotti, Rep Prog Phys 2016, 79, 046601; C. Creton, Macromolecules 2017, 50, 8297.
[2]        E. Ducrot, Y. Chen, M. Bulters, R. P. Sijbesma, C. Creton, Science 2014, 344, 186.
[3]        R. Gostl, R. P. Sijbesma, Chemical Science 2016, 7, 370; Y. Chen, A. J. H. Spiering, KarthikeyanS, G. W. M. Peters, E. W. Meijer, R. P. Sijbesma, Nature Chemistry 2012, 4, 559; D. A. Davis, A. Hamilton, J. Yang, L. D. Cremar, D. Van Gough, S. L. Potisek, M. T. Ong, P. V. Braun, T. J. Martinez, S. R. White, J. S. Moore, N. R. Sottos, Nature 2009, 459, 68.

Bio: 1985 : BS, Materials Science & Engineering, EPFL , Switzerland
1991 : Ph. D. Cornell University, USA
1992-1993 : Research Fellow, IBM Almaden, USA
1994-2001:  CNRS Researcher (Assistant Professor) at the ESPCI, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Polymers, Paris, France
2001-  :  CNRS Research Director (Professor) at the ESPCI, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Polymers, Paris, France
 
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IGM Colloquium: Mechanics-guided, deterministic 3D assembly

Prof. Yonggang Huang, Northwestern University

Abstract:
Complex three-dimensional (3D) structures in biology (e.g., cytoskeletal webs, neural circuits, and vasculature networks) form naturally to provide essential functions in even the most basic forms of life.  Compelling opportunities exist for analogous 3D architectures in human-made devices, but design options are constrained by existing capabilities in materials growth and assembly.  We report routes to previously inaccessible classes of 3D constructs in advanced materials, including device-grade silicon [1].  The schemes involve geometric transformation of 2D micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts by compressive buckling.  Designs inspired by kirigami/origami [2,3] and/or releasable multilayers [4] enable the formation of mesostructures with a broad variety of 3D geometries, either with hollow or dense distributions.  Demonstrations include experimental and theoretical studies of more than 100 representative geometries, from single and multiple helices, toroids, and conical spirals to structures that resemble spherical baskets, cars, houses, cuboid cages, starbursts, flowers, scaffolds, each with single- and/or multiple-level configurations.  Morphable 3D mesostructures whoese geometries can be elastically altered can be further achieved via nonlinear mechanical buckling, by deforming the elastomer platforms in different time sequences [5].  We further introduce concepts in physical transfer, patterned photopolymerization and non-linear plasticity to enable integration of 3D mesostructures onto nearly any class of substrate, with additional capabilities in access to fully or partially free-standing forms, all via mechanisms quantitatively described by theoretical modeling [6].  Compatibility with the well-established technologies available in semiconductor industries suggests a broad range of application opportunities [7].  Illustrations of these ideas include their use in building 3D structures as radio frequency devices for adaptive electromagnetic properties [5], as open-architecture electronic scaffolds for formation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neural networks [6], as ultra-stretchable interconnects for soft electronics [8] and as catalyst supports for propulsive systems in 3D micro-swimmers with geometrically controlled dynamics [6].

References
[1]          Xu S et al., 2015. Assembly of micro/nanomaterials into complex, three-dimensional architectures by compressive buckling. Science, 347, pp.154-159.
[2]          Zhang Y et al., 2015. A mechanically driven form of Kirigami as a route to 3D mesostructures in micro/nanomembranes. PNAS, 112, pp.11757-11764.
[3]          Yan Z et al., 2016. Controlled mechanical buckling for origami-inspired construction of 3D micro/nanostructures in advanced materials. Advanced Functional Materials, 26, pp.2629-2639.
[4]          Yan Z et al., 2016. Mechanically guided assembly of complex, 3D mesostructures from releasable multilayers of advanced materials. Science Advances, 2, pp.e1601014.
[5]          Fu H et al., 2018. Morphable 3D Mesostructures and Microelectronic Devices by Multistable Buckling Mechanics. Nature Materials, 17, pp. 268-276.
[6]          Yan Z et al., 2017. Mechanically guided assembly of complex, 3D mesostructures from releasable multilayers of advanced materials. PNAS, 114, pp. E9455-E9464.
[7]          Zhang Y et al., 2017. Printing, Folding and assembly methods for forming 3D mesostructures in advanced materials. Nature Reviews Materials, 2, pp. 17019.
[8]          Jang KI et al., 2017. Self-Assembled, Three Dimensional Network Designs of Soft Electronics. Nature Communications, 8, 15894.

Bio:
Yonggang Huang is the Murphy Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University.  He is interested in mechanics of stretchable and flexible electronics, and mechanically guided deterministic 3D assembly.  He has published >500 journal papers, including 10 in Science and 4 in Nature.  He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a member of European Academy of Sciences and Arts, a foreign member of Academia Europaea, and a foreign member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.  His recent research awards include the Larson Award (2003), Melville Medal (2004), Richards Award (2010), Drucker Medal (2013), and Nadai Medal (2016) from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME); Young Investigator Medal (2006) and Prager Medal (2017) from the Society of Engineering Sciences; International Journal of Plasticity Medal (2007); Guggenheim Fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (2008); Highly Cited Researcher in Engineering  (2009), Materials Science (since 2014) and Physics (since 2018), and Bazant Medal from the American Society of Civil Engineers (2018).  He has received awards for teaching and undergraduate advising from University of Arizona (1993); University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007); and Northwestern University (2016, 2018).
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Laser-MEMS scanning mirror for ultra-miniature video projection

Dr. Nicolas Abelé

Abstract: MEMS mirror have been developed since the early 90’s, originally for telecom-switching application, but also in parallel for scanning-based laser projection systems with the great benefit of providing a projected image with very large color gamut, always-in-focus, ultra-small and low power. Originally Lemoptix was a spin-off from the EPFL Micro-Systems laboratory was one of the pioneers in this field and has develop in-house MEMS-based laser projection system for multiple markets, ranging from Head-Up Display in car, AR wearable glass, 3D sensing and pico-projector. The company has successfully been acquired by Intel in 2015 and developed the smallest AR glasses to date, then the team moved to MAGIC LEAP the leader in immersive AR glasses.

Bio: Nicolas Abelé, Director of HW at MAGIC LEAP, and former co-founder and CTO of Lemoptix, acquired in 2015 by Intel Corporation 8 years after its incorporation. Nicolas leads the hardware technology development from invention, to prototyping and up to production-ready at manufacturing partner lines. He holds 60 patents in the field of MEMS display and AR glass.

This seminar is part of the course 'MICRO-534 - Advanced MEMS and Microsystems'. The seminar is open to the interested public.


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Trigger waves in cell signalling

Prof. James Ferrell, Prof. of Chemical and Systems Biology, Professor of Biochemistry, Stanford University. US. 

The Ferrell lab studies signal transduction and cell cycle regulation, mainly focusing the spatial and temporal regulation of mitotic entry and exit. They explore how the individual proteins that regulate these processes work together in circuits, generating reliable systems-level behaviors, by using quantitative experimental approaches, modeling, and theory. Much of their work make use of Xenopus laevis oocytes, eggs, embryos, and extracts, as well as mammalian cell lines.

About the talk

Ferrell’s group has been exploring the question of how regulatory signals spread through cells. By using as model system Xenopus egg extracts, the lab demonstrated that Cdk1 activity - which makes mitosis happen - and caspase-3/7 - which makes apoptosis happen - spread through the cytoplasm via what are termed trigger waves. There is good evidence that they do also in intact Xenopus eggs. Trigger waves require only three basic ingredients (positive feedback in the biochemical reactions, a mechanism for local spatial coupling, and a localized initiation point). The Ferrell lab suspects that they will prove to be widespread in the coordination of signaling in large cells and tissues.


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Approaches to porous materials development to address separation challenges

Dr. Camille PETIT
Department of Chemical Engineering,
Barrer Centre, Imperial College London

ChE-605 - Highlights in Energy Research seminar series
Access to clean water along with sustainable energy and the protection of the environment are probably the greatest challenges of our society but also a unique opportunity to reshape our technology landscape. Major molecular separation issues underpin these areas. Take for instance CO2 capture: here, one wishes to separate CO2 from other flue gas (or ambient air) components. Notably, existing separation processes account for 10 to 15% of the world energy consumption. Researchers must propose transformative approaches to molecular separations possibly exploiting the increasing complexity and sophistication of materials available to perform such separations.
This seminar will provide an overview of our research – past and current – in that direction. I will discuss selected examples of our work on the design, synthesis, characterisation and testing of porous materials (i.e. sorbents) to address separation challenges related to environmental, water and energy sustainability. I will focus specifically on our study of metal-organic frameworks and porous boron nitride for applications in carbon management and solar energy conversion. I will describe how our approach to material design, which combines aspects of chemistry, materials science and chemical engineering, enables us to identify key materials structure-property relationships while also accelerating the identification of the ‘best’ material for a given application.
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HASEL Artificial Muscles - Versatile High-Performance Actuators for a New Generation of Life-like Robots

Prof. Dr. Christoph Keplinger
University of Colorado Boulder

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/805358547

Abstract: Robots today rely on rigid components and electric motors based on metal and magnets, making them heavy, unsafe near humans, expensive and ill-suited for unpredictable environments. Nature, in contrast, makes extensive use of soft materials and has produced organisms that drastically outperform robots in terms of agility, dexterity, and adaptability. The Keplinger Lab aims to fundamentally challenge current limitations of robotic hardware, using an interdisciplinary approach that synergizes concepts from soft matter physics and chemistry with advanced engineering technologies to introduce intelligent materials systems for a new generation of life-like robots. One major theme of research is the development of new classes of actuators – a key component of all robotic systems – that replicate the sweeping success of biological muscle, a masterpiece of evolution featuring astonishing all-around actuation performance, the ability to self-heal after damage, and seamless integration with sensing.

This talk is focused on the labs' recently introduced HASEL artificial muscle technology. Hydraulically Amplified Self-healing ELectrostatic (HASEL) transducers are a new class of self-sensing, high-performance muscle-mimetic actuators, which are electrically driven and harness a mechanism that couples electrostatic and hydraulic forces to achieve a wide variety of actuation modes. Current designs of HASEL are capable of exceeding actuation stress of 0.3 MPa, linear strain of 100%, specific power of 600W/kg, full-cycle electromechanical efficiency of 30% and bandwidth of over 100Hz; all these metrics match or exceed the capabilities of biological muscle. Additionally, HASEL actuators can repeatedly and autonomously self-heal after electric breakdown, thereby enabling robust performance. Further, this talk introduces a facile fabrication technique that uses an inexpensive CNC heat sealing device to rapidly prototype HASELs. New designs of HASEL incorporate mechanisms to greatly reduce operating voltages, enabling the use of lightweight and portable electronics packages to drive untethered soft robotic devices powered by HASELs. Modeling results predict the impact of material parameters and scaling laws of these actuators, laying out a roadmap towards future HASEL actuators with drastically improved performance. These results highlight opportunities to further develop HASEL artificial muscles for wide use in next-generation robots that replicate the vast capabilities of biological systems.

Bio: Christoph Keplinger is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and a Fellow of the Materials Science and Engineering Program at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he also holds an endowed appointment serving as Mollenkopf Faculty Fellow. Building upon his background in soft matter physics (PhD, JKU Linz), mechanics and chemistry (Postdoc, Harvard University), he leads a highly interdisciplinary research group at Boulder, with a current focus on (I) soft, muscle-mimetic actuators and sensors, (II) energy harvesting and (III) functional polymers. His work has been published in top journals including Science, Science Robotics, PNAS, Advanced Materials and Nature Chemistry, as well as highlighted in popular outlets such as National Geographic. He has received prestigious US awards such as a 2017 Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, and international awards such as the 2013 EAPromising European Researcher Award from the European Scientific Network for Artificial Muscles. He is the principal inventor of HASEL artificial muscles, a new technology that will help enable a next generation of life-like robotic hardware; in 2018 he co-founded Artimus Robotics to commercialize the HASEL technology.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Mechanisms of lung cancer development: from tumor immunology to cellular metabolism

Dr Etienne Meylan

Abstract:
With approximately 1.8 million deaths each year, lung cancer has become the leading cause of cancer mortality in women and men worldwide. In the last fifteen years, great clinical progress has been made that offers new hope for patients, as exemplified by the advent of targeted therapies and more recently immunotherapies. Yet, current treatments only benefit a fraction of patients and rarely lead to a cure. To address the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving lung cancer growth and treatment resistance, my laboratory combines human tumor material, genetically-engineered mouse models, bioinformatics, and new research tools that we develop to manipulate both tumor cells and host cells. In this seminar, I will summarize our recent investigations and technology development in two intersecting major research areas: tumor immunology and cancer metabolism. First, in exploring tumor-infiltrating immune cells, we identified a population of neutrophils that promotes lung tumor progression as well as their resistance to immunotherapy. Second, in studying lung cancer metabolism, we found that tumor-associated neutrophils, similarly to lung tumor cells, upregulate the expression of high-affinity glucose transporters; this change rewires metabolic activity and fosters tumor growth. We are currently making use of the above findings to identify new pathways and vulnerabilities that could be exploited for simultaneously targeting tumor cells and non-cancerous, tumor-supporting neutrophils, with the ultimate goal to impact cancer growth and sensitize refractory tumors to immunotherapy.

Short bio:
Etienne Meylan received a PhD in Life Sciences from the University of Lausanne in 2006, for his work on innate immunity performed in the laboratory of Jürg Tschopp. From 2007 to 2010, he worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Tyler Jacks at MIT, Cambridge USA. In 2011, he established his research laboratory at ISREC, as a Swiss National Science Foundation Professor and since 2013 as a Tenure-track Assistant Professor. His laboratory studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to the development of lung cancer, with a particular focus on alterations of tumor immunology and metabolism. Understanding these crucial perturbations of tumors may lead to a better comprehension of this devastating disease and to new perspectives of treatment.
 
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To be defined

Prof. Fritz Bircher, Institute of Printing (iPrint), University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland


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Save the date: PRIMA Leadership Programme - Kick-off event

Keynote - Margaret J. Wheatley: The essential role played by women leaders: past, present, and future

Panel: The need for women’s leadership is more acute than ever. How can we make this happen?

Last year, the SNSF launched PRIMA, its new funding scheme for outstanding women researchers. PRIMA grantees benefit from a first-rate leadership programme, which we are launching at a special event in Bern. Don't miss the opportunity to hear a thought-provoking keynote speech by the renowned leadership expert Margaret J. Wheatley and participate in discussions on leadership and gender in science. By attending the event, you will also be contributing to the visibility and networking of women scientists.


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CESS Seminar: Utilization of physics-based simulated earthquake ground motions for performance assessment of tall buildings – validation, collapse safety, and machine learning tools for regional risk evaluation

Dr. Nenad Bijelić, postdoctoral scholar at the Unit of Applied Mechanics, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Limited data on strong earthquakes and their effects on structures poses one of the main challenges of making reliable risk assessments of tall buildings. For instance, while the collapse safety of tall buildings is likely controlled by large magnitude earthquakes with long durations and high low-frequency content, there are few available recorded ground motions to evaluate these issues. The influence of geologic basins on amplifying ground motion effects raises additional questions. Absent recorded motions from past large magnitude earthquakes, physics-based ground motion simulations provide an attractive alternative. This talk will focus on utilization of simulated ground motions for performance assessment of tall buildings with the following overall goals: (1) developing confidence in the use of simulated ground motions through comparative assessments of recorded and simulated motions; (2) identifying important characteristics of extreme ground motions for collapse safety of tall buildings; (3) exploring areas where simulated ground motions provide significant advantages over recorded motions for performance-based engineering. First, we will examine an effort to validate the use of physics-based simulations in engineering applications by using ground motions simulated with Southern California Earthquake Center’s (SCEC) Broadband Platform (BBP). Next, collapse risk of tall buildings in the Los Angeles basin will be investigated by contrasting conventional risk assessments with assessments obtained utilizing the SCEC CyberShake simulations. Finally, we will quantify the influence of basin effects on seismic collapse risk and present machine learning approaches for identification of efficient intensity measures and development of reliable collapse classification algorithms. Opportunities for future work will be discussed.

Bio
Nenad Bijelić is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the Unit of Applied Mechanics, University of Innsbruck, Austria. He obtained his Ph.D. (2018) and M.S. (2014) from Stanford University, USA, and B.S. (2010) from University of Zagreb, Croatia all in civil engineering. In 2012 he received the Fulbright Science and Technology award to study earthquake engineering in the USA. His research is in the area of structural and earthquake engineering focusing on dynamics of nonlinear systems and application of statistical and machine learning tools. Focus of his recent research was on reliable risk assessment of tall buildings located in sedimentary basins through high-performance computing and utilization of emergent technologies in earthquake simulations. He is a reviewer for Natural Hazards Review and served as a reviewer for the 11th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering. 


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to be announced

Prof. Chad Mirkin, Northwestern University, Evanston. IL (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Chad A. Mirkin, Ph.D., is the Director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and the George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry. Mirkin also is a professor of chemical and biological engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science & engineering, and medicine at Northwestern University.
Mirkin is a chemist and world-renowned nanoscience expert who is known for his discovery and development of spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), and the many medical diagnostic, therapeutic, and materials applications that have derived from them: Dip-Pen Naolithography (recognized by National Geographic as one of the "top 100 scientific discoveries that changed the world"); and numerous other contributions to supramolecular chemistry.
He is one of very few scientists elected into all three branches of the US National Academies (Medicine, Science, and Engineering). He served for eight years a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology under President Barack Obama. He has been recognized for his accomplishments with several national and international awards, including: the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in Convergence Research, the Dan David Prize, the Wilhelm Exner Medal, the RUSNANOPRIZE, the Dickson Prize in Science, the American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal, and the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize.
Mirkin holds a B.S. degree from Dickinson College (1986, elected into Phi Beta Kappa) and a Ph.D.in chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University (1989). He was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT prior to becoming a professor at Northwestern University in 1991.
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Nanoscale Multimaterials with Complex Anisotropies

Prof. Gero Decher, Charles Sadron Institute, Strasbourg France

Most of the current materials are isotropic, materials with anisotropic properties are in general much more difficult to prepare and much more difficult to characterize. In the past our team has introduced the so-called Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly method1,2) which has the largest choice of deployable components among all existing techniques for surface functionalization. It allows to design and prepare nanoscale materials composed of hundreds of different components with adjustable multifunctionality, a task close to impossible for most other self-assembly methods.
For the preparation of highly anisotropic nanocomposites we have recently introduced grazing incidence spraying3,4) (Fig. 1) for aligning nano-wires, nano-rods and nano-fibers in-plane during the deposition of individual layers when building up LbL-assemblies. With unidirectionally oriented multilayers one can for example fabricate multilayer films containing ultrathin polarizers4). Grazing incidence spraying is, however, capable of producing more complex anisotropies even over large surface areas by changing the direction of alignment in each individual layer of a multilayer films.

References:
1) See for example: Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Multifunctional Hybrid Materials and Nanoscale Devices, Seyrek E and Decher G
(2012). In: Polymer Science: A Comprehensive Reference, Vol 7, (2012) pp. 159–185, Matyjaszewski K. and Möller M. (eds.),
Amsterdam: Elsevier BV
2) G. Decher, Science 277 (5330), 1232-1237 (1997)
3) R. Blell, X.F. Lin, T. Lindstrøm, M. Ankerfors, M. Pauly, O. Felix and Gero Decher, ACS Nano 11(1), 84-94 (2016).
4) H. Hu, M. Pauly, O. Felix and G. Decher, Nanoscale 9(3), 1307-1314 (2016).
Bio: • 2004-2007 Membre nommé du Comité National (C.N.R.S., Section 11)
• since 2005 Co-Editor “Biointerphases” (American Institute of Physics)
• 2005 Chair Gordon Research Conference on "Ion-Containing Polymers", May 1-6,
2005, Il Ciocco, Barga, Italy, (Chairs: Gero Decher & Robert B. Moore)
• 2003 Chair Gordon Research Conference on "Organic Thin Films", May 18-23, 2003,
Il Ciocco, Barga, Italy
• 2001-2009 Deputy Director of the Institut Charles Sadron (CNRS, UPR 22)
• 2000-2005 Editorial Advisory Board "Nano Letters" (American Chemical Society)


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IGM Colloquium: Chemistry makes graphene interfaces great again: a first-principles investigation

Prof. Marie-Laure Bocquet, CNRS, Chemistry Laboratory, ENS Paris

Abstract:
Graphene is an attractive candidate for carbon-based electronic devices. However the absence of band gap is a major hindrance for this promising application. There is a need to develop facile routes for engineering the band gap via molecular functionalizations. The challenge resides in the fact that graphene is assumed to be chemically inert. [1]
In this talk I will mitigate this assumption and show using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry how graphene can properly react with molecules under mild conditions, first in UHV on a specific UHV graphene/metal interface [2] and seconds in alkaline water solvent .[3-4]
 
References:
[1] A. Eftekhari, H. Garcia, Materials Today Chemistry 4, 1 (2017).
[2] S. J. Altenburg, M. Lattelais, B. Wang, M.−L. Bocquet, and R. Berndt, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 137, 9452 (2015)
[3] B. Grosjean B, C. Péan, A. Siria, L. Bocquet, R. Vuilleumier, M.-L. Bocquet, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 7, 4695 (2016)
[4] B. Grosjean, M.-L. Bocquet, L. Bocquet, Nature Com. in revision.
 
Bio:
Marie-Laure Bocquet (born 1968) graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon in 1993, performed her phD about the simulation of STM images under the supervision of Philippe Sautet in the Chemistry Laboratory of ENS Lyon. She is now a Director of Research at the CNRS in the Chemistry Laboratory of ENS Paris, where her research interests are focused on the elucidation of chemical processes occuring at metallic, oxide or graphenic surfaces either in vacuum or in water media . They are mainly driven by high-resolution data acquired with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope STM or nanofluidic measurements in collaborative experimental groups.
In 2007 she held an one-year Humboldt Fellowship to study (in collaboration with Munich) the STM & theory of epitaxial graphene on metal surfaces. In 2013 she took a year sabbatical stay in the CNRS-MIT joint lab, Cambridge USA in 2013 working on atomistic models of shale gas.
Her scientific production consists of 79 publications in peer-reviewed journals (including Nature Chemistry, PRL, JACS and Angewandte), 26 Invited Talks in international conferences and 27 Invited Seminars in international institutions.
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IGM Colloquium: Water flows at nanoscales and exotic ionic transport

Prof. Lydéric Bocquet, CNRS, ENS Paris

Abstract:
It is an exciting period for nanofluidics, the field exploring the transport of fluids at the nanoscales. Routes now exist to fabricate individual channels with nanometric and even sub-nanometric dimensions, while new instruments have also been invented to probe transport across these channels. And indeed, a number of quite exotic properties for water and ion transport have emerged since. This presentation will highlight several such phenomena.
 
Bio:
Lydéric Bocquet is director of research at CNRS and joint professor at the physics department of ENS Paris. He received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in Lyon in 1994. His research interests extend to domains at the interface of soft condensed matter, fluid dynamics and nanoscience. He combines experiments, theory and simulations to explore the intimate mechanisms of fluid interfaces from the macroscopic down to the molecular level. His recent interests aimed at taking benefit of the unexpected fluid transport behavior occurring at the nanoscales to propose new routes for energy harvesting and desalination. Beyond academically oriented topics, he also has a strong interest in every-day life science. He obtained several awards, including two advanced grants of the ERC in 2010 and 2018. He is cofounder of the startup Sweetch Energy.
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Assessment Matters

Roland Tormey

To develop assessment techniques which are valid and objective, notably to test if students have met the required learning outcomes.


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to be announced

Prof. Wilson Wong, Boston University, Boston, MA (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Nanocrystals as chemical building blocks

Prof. Helmut Cölfen, University of Konstanz, Physical Chemistry

Nanoparticles have interesting analogies to molecules. Recent research has revealed that nanocrystals can align and fuse to larger single crystalline units (Oriented Attachment) or build self-assembled superstructures with mutual crystallographic order (Mesocrystals). These examples suggest that it should be possible to establish chemistry with nanocrystals as chemical building blocks. Nanocrystals are similar to molecules concerning active reaction sites and ability for directed interactions. Oriented attachment is analogous to chemical bond formation, while mesocrystal formation is analogous to non-covalent bonds in complexes between molecules. Key for the defined nanocrystal activation as chemical building unit is the selective adsorption/desorption of specially designed molecules on pre-defined crystal faces. Examples for this concept will be given for gold nanoparticles.
Alternatively, interaction of the nanocrystal surface adsorbed molecules can be induced, leading to mesocrystal formation. Examples will be given for magnetite mesocrystals and their analogies to classical crystals will be discussed. Also, first results on the formation of binary mesocrystals will be given, combining the properties of chemically different nanocrystals.

Bio: HELMUT CÖLFEN is full professor for physical chemistry at the university of Konstanz. His research interests are in the area of nucleation, classical and non-classical crystallization, Biomineralization, synthesis of functional polymers, directed self assembly of nanoparticles and fractionating methods of polymer and nanoparticle analysis. He has published more than 350 papers and was listed among the top 100 chemists 2000 – 2010 by Thomson Reuters.

 


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mTOR and Lysosomes in Growth Control

Prof. David Sabatini, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
Our lab is interested in the regulation of growth and metabolism by nutrients and for some time we have focused on the mTOR pathway, particularly the nutrient-sensing network anchored by mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1). I will discuss our latest work on how mTORC1 senses cytosolic and lysosomal amino acids and the role selective autophagy plays. I will highlight our use of a method we developed to profile the metabolite and protein content of organelles to identify proteins that move on and off lysosomes in response to nutrient conditions. I also may present our use of somatic cell genetics to identify new components of metabolic pathways, particularly in mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism.

 
Bio:
David M. Sabatini is an American scientist and Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. He has been an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2008 and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016. He is known for his important contributions in the areas of cell signaling and cancer metabolism, most notably the discovery and study of mTOR, a protein kinase that is an important regulator of cell and organismal growth that is deregulated in cancer, diabetes, as well as the aging process.

Education:
MD/PhD 1997, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Research Summary:
We probe the basic mechanisms that regulate growth — the process whereby cells and organisms accumulate mass and increase in size. The pathways that control growth are often hindered in human diseases like diabetes and cancer. Our long-term goals are to identify and characterize these mechanisms, and to understand their roles in normal and diseased mammals.
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3D Morphological Characterization of Complex Soft Matter Assemblies at the Sub-Unit Cell Level

Prof. Erwin Thomas, Thomas Research Group, Rice University Houston USA

The double gyroid (DG) microdomain structure is a complex 3D tubular network structure found in block copolymers as well as in butterfly wings and amphiphilic phases.   We employ a slice and view electron microscopy technique to directly generate a 3D tomogram of the DG nanoscale structure.  The material studied is a polystyrene (PS) – polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) diblock copolymer that exhibits the DG network morphology with a lattice parameter of ~ 130nm, with feature sizes on the 20 nm scale, typical of many soft matter assemblies.   By alternating between a thin ion beam slice and a secondary electron image using a low voltage incident electron beam, the voxel size is approximately 3 x 3 x 3 nm3 allowing analysis of a comprehensive set of sub-unit cell morphological descriptors and enabling critical comparison to theoretical models of the structure.  We find that the PS-PDMS material does not exhibit cubic symmetry, but rather a range of triclinic shapes, most likely due to distortions of the structure from solvent induced shrinkage during film preparation.  Analysis of the triclinic unit cell determines the magnitudes and directions of the shear and tensile deformations that can be re-expressed as an eigen-matrix of principal compressive/tensile strains (average compressive strain of ~ -20% and tensile strain about + 20%).  Morphological characteristics are analyzed including direct measures of the distributions of the distances between the interface between the two blocks and the skeletal graph and the distance between the interface and the triply periodic gyroid minimal surface, the mean and Gaussian curvatures of the interface, the dihedral angle between adjacent nodes, as well as the node-node strut lengths and directions. These very detailed experimental measures are compared with self consistent field theory calculations of a PS-PDMS melt undergoing the ODT under boundary conditions that are matched to the deformed cubic (i.e. triclinic) unit cell.
 
References:
 
Prasad, I., Jinnai, H., Ho, R-M., Thomas, E. L. and Grason, G. “Anatomy of triply-periodic network assemblies:  Characterizing skeletal and inter-domain surface geometry of block copolymer gyroids,” Soft Matter, 14, 3612-3623 (2018).
 
X. Feng, H. Guo and E. L. Thomas, “Topological Defects in Tubular Network Block Copolymers,” Polymer, (2019) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polymer.2019.01.085

Bio:
Edwin L. “Ned” Thomas served as William and Stephanie Sick Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering at Rice from 2011 to 2017. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Materials Science and NanoEngineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and collaborates with scientists and engineers in the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology at Rice.
 
Thomas is a materials scientist and mechanical engineer and is passionate about promoting engineering leadership and student design competitions. His research is currently focused on using 2D and 3D lithography, direct-write and self-assembly techniques for creating metamaterials with unprecedented mechanical and thermal properties.
 
Thomas is the former head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a position he held from 2006 until his appointment at Rice in July 2011. He was named Morris Cohen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in 1989 and is the founder and former director of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology (2002-2006).
 
Before joining MIT in 1988, Thomas founded and served as co-director of the Institute for Interface Science and was head of the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Massachusetts. He is a recipient of the 1991 High Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society and the 1985 American Chemical Society Creative Polymer Chemist award. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009, Inaugural Fellow of the Materials Society in 2008, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2003 and Fellow of the American Physical Society in 1986. He wrote the undergraduate textbook, The Structure of Materials, and has coauthored more than 450 papers and holds 20 patents.
 
Thomas received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts and his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Cornell University.

 


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APIX: NEMS-based gas chromatograph

Eric Colinet, R&D manager, APIX analytics, Grenoble, France

Abstract: Apix-Analytics, the leader in Nano-Sensor (NEMS) based gas chromatography (GC) system is a start-up company from CEA-LETI and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) founded in December 2011. The presentation will present why NEMS resonators offer a unique breakthrough technology in the GC field and will discuss how the key challenges such as industrialization, multi scale system integration combining mechanical, chemical and electronic sub-systems are addressed.

Bio: Eric Colinet graduated from INSA-Lyon France in 2002 and received a PhD from SUPELEC PARIS in 2005 and a HDR from INP- GRENOBLE in 2010. In 2011, he cofounded Apix-Analytics, a start-up company from CEA-LETI/CALTECH specialized in Nano-Sensor based gas analysis systems, where he is now managing the research and development activities. His field of expertise covers micro & nano electromechanical systems (MEMS-NEMS), sensors & actuators, control theory & signal processing, solid-state electronics & IC, MEMS-CMOS Integration. He is the author of more than 100 scientific papers and holds over 20 patents.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.

Apix Analytics - Company Website


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A New Flexible Photoplethysmography (PPG) Sensor Patch for Continuous Measurement of Blood Flow Volume and Pressure based on AI algorithms

Prof. Dr. Paul Chao
National Chiao Tung University Taiwan

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/997034286

Abstract: A new flexible hotoplethysmography (PPG) sensor patch measuring blood-flow volume (BFV) and blood pressure (BP) based on AI algorithms is successfully designed and prototyped. With this patch, the measurement on BFV and BP is non-invasively, and can be continuously collected over more than 24 hours, resulting in valuable long-time monitoring data for medical diagnosis. These long-time, continuous BVF measurements are particularly important for monitoring the quality of an arteriovenous fistula of a hemodialysis patient for prognosis. As opposed to the developed patch, an expensive and bulky BFV monitor is commonly adopted in clinic practice as a gold standard for BFV measurement once per months. The instrument needs to be operated by professional, well-trained medical personnel. The PPG sensor patch developed is instead a low-cost, small-sized, wearable, and easy-to-use sensor that is capable of continuously measuring BFV and BP via AI algorithm. New designs of front-end analog circuit, signal processing, and an intelligent neural network calibration method are employed to achieve high correlations of R2 = 0.88 for BFV and R2 = 0.85 for BP, as opposed to their gold standard counterpart monitors.

Bio: Dr. Paul C.-P. Chao received his Ph.D. degree from Michigan State University, USA, and then with Chrysler Corp in Auburn Hill, Detroit, USA before joined National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Taiwan. He is currently University Distinguished Professor of the electrical engineering department at NCTU, and Distinguished Lecturer for IEEE Sensors Council, 2018 – 2010. His research interests focus on sensors, actuators and their interface circuitry. Dr. Chao has published more than 280 peer-reviewed papers (books, journal papers, conferences, reports) and 38 patents.
Dr. Chao was the recipient of the 1999 Arch T. Colwell Merit Award from Society of Automotive Engineering, Detroit, USA; the 2004 Long-Wen Tsai Best Paper Award from National Society of Machine Theory and Mechanism, Taiwan; the 2005 Best Paper Award from National Society of Engineers, Taiwan; the 2007 Acer Long-Term Award; the 2009 Best Paper Award from the Symposium on Nano-Device Technology; the 2010/2014 Best Paper Award from the Annual ASME Conference on Information Storage and Processing Systems (ISPS); the second most downloaded paper in IEEE Sensors Journal in 2011; the Best Poster Paper award of IDMC 2015; the prestigious Outstanding Research Award from National Association of Automatic Control in Taiwan in 2015; the prestigious National Innovation Award of Taiwan government 2016; The 2017 Best Industrial Project Award by Ministry of Science and technology, Taiwan government; The 2017 Presidential Outstanding Professor of Engineering in Nation (Taiwan) (awarded by the president of the nation in the Presidential House of Taiwan, ROC); Two 2017 Future Technology Awards (Taiwan Oscar Invention Award) from Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Taiwan Government; The 2018 Outstanding Professor of Electrical Engineering in Nation (Taiwan), National Association of Electrical Engineering, Taiwan; The second National Innovation Award of Taiwan Government in 2018.
Dr. Chao has served as University Associate Vice Presidents of NCTU for academic affairs (2009-2010) and research and development (2015); the Secretary General, IEEE Taipei Section, 2009-2010; the founding chair of Taipei chapter for the IEEE Sensor Council; Member-at-Large for IEEE Sensors Council, 2012-2014. Dr. Chao received major IEEE awards for this service: The IEEE Large Section Award from IEEE Head Quarter for the outstanding service as the Secretary for 2009-2010, and The IEEE MGA Award from IEEE Region 10 for outstanding service as the Secretary for IEEE Taipei Section, 2009-2010. He was the General Chair of the 2016 ASME ISPS and IoT conference in Santa Clara, CA, USA; chairs and co-chairs of major conferences. For editorial services, he is currently Topical Editors of IEEE Sensors Journal and IEEE IoT Journal. He was the Associate Editors of ASME Journal of Vibration and Acoustics and Journal of Circuit, System and Computer; guest editors of special journal issues. Dr. Chao received the award of the 2017 Best Topical Editor, Runner up, IEEE Sensors Journal. He is a senior member of IEEE and ASME Fellow.


Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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to be announced

Prof. Cheng Zhu, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Hybrid Additive Manufacturing of metal parts with 3D control of internal stresses and microstructures

Prof. Roland Logé, Laboratory of Thermomechanical Metallurgy, EPFL

A new hybrid additive manufacturing process is introduced, combining Laser Shock Peening (LSP) with Selective Laser Melting (SLM), and called 3D LSP. LSP is a well-known surface treatment introducing plastic deformation and Compressive Residual Stresses (CRS) over a certain penetration depth into the material. By repeatedly applying LSP during the part fabrication, 3D LSP can efficiently strain harden a metal and convert SLM induced Tensile Residual Stresses (TRS) into CRS, in the bulk of the part. This strategy opens a range of new possibilities such as increased fatigue life or geometrical accuracy, 3D design of grain structures, and improved processability. Examples are provided for each of these effects, looking at fatigue life and grain structure design of 316L steel samples, geometrical accuracy of Ti-6Al-4V samples, and processability of a Ni-based superalloy. In the latter case, 3D LSP brings a new efficient crack healing mechanism.   ·        References :   -        N. Kalentics, E. Boillat, P. Peyre, S. Ćirić-Kostić, N. Bogojević, R.E. Logé (2017), “Tailoring residual stress profile of Selective Laser Melted parts by Laser Shock Peening”, Additive Manufacturing 16, 90-97. -        N. Kalentics, E. Boillat, P. Peyre, C. Gorny, C. Kenel, C. Leinenbach, J. Jhabvala, R. E. Logé (2017), 3D Laser Shock Peening – a new method for the 3D control of residual stresses in Selective Laser Melting, Materials & Design 130, 350–356. -        N. Kalentics, A. Burn, M. Cloots and R.E. Logé (2018), “3D laser shock peening as a way to improve geometrical accuracy in selective laser melting“, Int. J. Advanced Manufacturing Technology, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-018-3033-3. -        N. Kalentics, K. Huang, M. Ortega Varela de Seijas, A. Burn, V. Romano and R.E. Logé (2019), “Laser shock peening: A promising tool for tailoring metallic microstructures in selective laser melting”, J. Materials Processing Tech. 266, 612–618.

Bio: Roland Logé is an associate professor at EPFL, with a primary affiliation to the Materials Institute, and a secondary affiliation to the Microengineering Institute. He is the head of the Laboratory of Thermomechanical Metallurgy, and active in the field of processing of metals and alloys in the solid state, focusing on the ability to tailor microstructures, and the associated material properties. Thermal and mechanical paths and the resulting microstructures are analyzed and simulated both experimentally and numerically. While most of the activities were so far related to recrystallization, precipitation, grain growth, textures and grain boundary engineering,  extensions of the microstructure design approach progressively include phase transformations, internal stresses and cracking phenomena, with applications to bulk metal forming and additive manufacturing.


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Repurposing Ribosomes for Synthetic Biology

Prof. Michael Jewett, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (USA)

BIOENGINEERING SEMINAR

Abstract:
Imagine a world in which we could adapt biology to manufacture any therapeutic, material, or chemical from renewable resources, both quickly and on demand. Industrial biotechnology is one of the most attractive approaches for addressing this need, particularly when large-scale chemical synthesis is untenable. Unfortunately, current approaches to engineering organisms remain costly and slow. This is because cells themselves impose limitations on biobased product synthesis. It is difficult to balance intracellular fluxes to optimally satisfy a very active synthetic pathway while the machinery of the cell is functioning to maintain reproductive viability. Further, chemical reactions take place behind a selective barrier, the cell wall, which limits sample acquisition, monitoring, and direct control. In addition, cells are adapted to a relatively simple chemical operating system (i.e., a few common sugars, 20 amino acids), which presents researchers a limited set of accessible molecules with which to work. In this presentation, I will discuss my group's efforts to overcome these limitations and widen the aperture of the traditional model of biotechnology.  In one direction, we seek to create a new paradigm for engineering biocatalytic systems using cell-free biology. In another area, we are catalyzing new directions to repurpose the translation apparatus for synthetic biology. Our new paradigms for biochemical engineering are enabling a deeper understanding of why nature’s designs work the way they do, as well as opening the way to novel biobased products that have been impractical, if not impossible, to produce by other means. 

Bio:
Michael Jewett is the Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence, a Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and co-director of the Center for Synthetic Biology at Northwestern University. He is also an Institute Fellow at the Northwestern Argonne Institute for Science & Engineering. Dr. Jewett’s lab seeks to re-conceptualize the way we engineer complex biological systems for compelling applications in medicine, materials, and energy by transforming biochemical engineering with synthetic biology. Dr. Jewett is the recipient of the NIH Pathway to Independence Award in 2009, David and Lucile Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering in 2011, the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2011, the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2011, the 3M non-tenured faculty grant in 2012, the Camille-Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award in 2015, the ACS Biochemical Technologies Division Young Investigator Award in 2017, and the Biochemical Engineering Young Investigator Award in 2018. He received his PhD in 2005 at Stanford University and completed postdoctoral studies at the Center for Microbial Biotechnology in Denmark and the Harvard Medical School.
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Research Data Management workshop

EPFL Library Research Data team

"Introduction" workshop
In this course, you will get an introduction to the main concepts of Research Data Management to apply them to your specific situation. Learning outcomes:
  • Know the stakes around Research Data Management
  • Discover how a Data Management Plan (DMP) can help you be more efficient in your research
  • Get an overview of good practices to work with your data at the different stages of your project

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to be announced

Prof. Gilad Haran, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (IL)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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From a Moore’s Law for Fibers To Fabrics as a Service

Prof. Yoel Fink, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT USA

Fibers and fabrics are among the earliest forms of human expression, and yet they haven’t changed much from a functional standpoint over the entire course of human experience. Recently, a new family of fibers composed of conductors, semiconductors and insulators has emerged. These fibers can achieve device attributes, yet are fabricated using scalable preform-based fiber-processing methods, yielding kilometers of functional fiber devices. Moreover, it is expected that the functions of fibers will increase dramatically over the next years creating a fiber equivalent of the “Moore’s law”. In this talk I will describe the underlying context for this “law” and discuss paths to achieving system level behavior on the fabric level. I will also outline progress to date in AFFOA, a US based advanced fabric non-profit dedicated to transforming traditional fibers, yarns, and fabrics into highly sophisticated, integrated and networked devices and systems that will see, hear, sense and communicate, store and convert energy, and change color heralding the transition of fabrics from a goods based industry to one that provides value added services.
 
Bio: Yoel Fink is Professor of Materials Science and Electrical Engineering at MIT. His research group has pioneered the field of multimaterial multifunctional fiber devices, and is focused on extending the frontiers of fiber materials to encompass electronic, optoelectronic and even acoustic properties for textile and composite applications.
 
Yoel is also the CEO of AFFOA (Advanced Functional Fabrics of America) and former Director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). RLE is MIT’s first interdisciplinary lab, with over 700 researchers and $60M a year budget.
 
Professor Fink holds a B.A. in Physics and a B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from the Technion, and a PhD from MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering. He is the recipient of multiple awards, among them the National Academies Initiatives in Research (2004), the MacVicar Fellowship (2007) for outstanding teaching and the Collier Medal (2016). Professor Fink is a co-founder of OmniGuide Inc. (2000) and served as its chief executive officer from 2007–2010. He presided over its commercial launch, established an 80% gross margin business and grew it to $20M. He is the coauthor of over ninety scientific journal articles and holds over fifty issued U.S. patents on multimaterial fibers and devices. As RLE Director, he initiated the Translational Fellows Program, a postdoc initiative that facilitates research-derived ventures, and the Low Cost Renovation effort.
 


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Packaging and Hybridization: the Valorization of MEMS Technologies

Dr. Michel Despont

Abstract: The integration of microsystems and, in particular, of MEMS devices continues to be a key element of many high technology application areas. If the devices themselves are crucial elements for innovation, their integration in a complete microsystem are essential for their successful commercialization. Hence development of 3D integration and packaging technologies are of the upmost importance. At CSEM we develop new solutions for wafer level hybridization and packaging solutions to respond to the demand of the industry active in microsystem technology. An overview of the packaging and hybridization technology will be presented along with some concrete examples such are biocompatible hermetic packaging for active implant, wafer level gas cell for atomic clock, wafer level hybridization for complex micromechanical components, heterogeneous integration of microdevices at wafer level, MEMS integration on soft micromodule.

Bio: Dr. Michel Despont received a Ph.D. in physics from the Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Switzerland, in 1996. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the IBM Research - Zurich laboratory in 1996, he spent one year as a visiting scientist at the Seiko Instrument Research Laboratory in Japan. In 2005, he was appointed manager and led the nanofabrication group at IBM Research – Zurich Laboratory. Since 2013, Dr Despont is currently employed by the Swiss Centre of Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) as Vice-President of the MEMS program and manager of the Emerging Micro&Nano Technologies section in the Micro&Nano Systems division.

CSEM Website.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.


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Leveraging Labs for Learning

Siara Isaac & Cécile Hardebolle

Explore ways to design lab experiments that help students develop a scientific approach which is transferable to real world complexity.


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Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics

Keynote and Invited Speakers on www.diamondphotonics.org

The Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics at EPFL will be a unique event bringing together for the first time the worldwide leaders in diamond photonics. It will gather on EPFL campus the key international players of academic research in physics and photonics, in growth and fabrication technologies, together with companies engaged in bringing the applications of diamond photonics to the market. As a meeting point for physicists, engineers, materials scientists, and entrepreneurs, the symposium will decisively contribute to the emergence of novel quantum technologies in photonics, such as quantum-enhanced sensors and secure communication devices, and of novel industrial photonic components such as cavities for high power lasers.
 


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Shine on, you Nanostructured Diamond (Public Lecture)

Prof. Dr. Marko Lončar,
Harvard University

Public Lecture as part of the Latsis Symposium 2019 on Diamond Photonics

The lecture is open to the large public and introduces the topic of Diamond Photonics in general terms. We welcome in particular also young participants with an interest in science and engineering to join. The event is free of charge, but registration is required. A link for registration will be announced on this event page shortly. The lecture will be followed by an apéro. The event receives generous financial support by by the Latsis Foundation. The event is supported by the International Day of Light and has received endorsment by the Optical Society of America.

Abstract: Diamond possesses remarkable physical properties, and in many ways is the ultimate engineering material! For example, diamond is transparent in ultra-violet, visible and infra-red wavelength range, and has a high refractive index, nearly twice that of water. As a result, light that enters diamond crystal is bent, twisted and reflected in exciting ways, resulting in sparklines of the diamond gemstones. Diamond is also the best thermal conductor and therefore can survive exposures to high power laser beams, even. Finally, diamond can be a host to wide variety of atomic impurities that in turn can change its color: from transparent to yellow, pink, even blue. Importantly, these impurities can also emit light, which makes them precious to scientists and engineers.  One particularly exciting application of diamond’s impurities is in the field of quantum information science and technology, which promises realization of powerful quantum computers capable of tackling problems that cannot be solved using classical approaches, as well as realization of secure communication channels. Other applications include detection of weak magnetic fields which is of importance in bio-medicine, navigation and timing, and so on.
I will first review advances in nanotechnology that have enabled fabrication of nanoscale optical devices in diamond – the hardest material on earth. I will then discuss how these devices can be used to generate, manipulate, and store quantum information, one photon at the time, and thus enable realization of secure communication networks. Finally, I will show how nanostructuring of diamond surface can be used to make it completely transparent (a perfect window) or completely reflective (a perfect mirror) to optical beams. Importantly, these windows and mirrors can withstand MegaWatts of laser power.

Biography: Marko Lončar is Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering at Harvard's John A Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), as well as Harvard College Professor. Loncar received his Diploma from University of Belgrade (R. Serbia) in 1997, and his PhD from Caltech in 2003 (with Axel Scherer), both in Electrical Engineering. After completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard (with Federico Capasso), he joined SEAS faculty in 2006. Loncar is expert in nanophotonics and nanofabrication, and his current research interests include quantum and nonlinear nanophotonics, quantum optomechanics, high-power optics, and nanofabrication. He has received NSF CAREER Award in 2009 and Sloan Fellowship in 2010. In recognition of his teaching activities, Loncar has been awarded Levenson Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (2012), and has been named Harvard College Professor in 2017. Loncar is fellow of Optical Society of America, and Senior Member of IEEE and SPIE.
 
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to be announced

Prof. Claire Hivroz, Institut Curie, Paris (F)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Versatile and scalable approaches to chemical processing of nanocarbons

Prof. Milo Shaffer, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London

Individual perfect nanocarbon structures have exceptional properties; the challenge is often how to exploit their potential in real macroscopic systems. Chemical functionalisation is critical to a wide range of nanocarbon technologies, but needs to be versatile and applicable at scale. Existing approaches tend to rely on liquid phase reactions, often requiring damaging sonication or lengthy work up through filtration or centrifugation. The formation of individualized functionalised single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphenes is a particular challenge.
One approach is to shift the modification reaction into the gas phase. We have developed a generic, scalable furnace treatment, based on the thermochemical activation of CNTs, followed by reaction with functional organic monomers. This approach allows the introduction of a wide variety of functional groups onto the CNT surface whilst maintaining the excellent properties of the untreated materials. The reaction is extremely versatile and can be carried out with a variety of monomers and carbon-based materials, and follows an unusual radical-based mechanism. 
A different approach to nanotube processing, relies on reductive charging to form pure nanotubides (nanotube anions) which can be redissolved, purified, or optionally functionalised, whist avoiding the damage typically associated with sonication and oxidation based processing. This simple system is effective for a host of nanocarbon materials including MWCNTs, ultralong SWCNTs, carbon blacks, and graphenes. The resulting nanocarbon ions can be readily chemically grafted for a variety of applications. Dispersed nanocarbon related materials can be assembled, by electrophoresis, cryogel formation, or direct cross-linking to form Joule heatable networks, protein nucleants, supercapacitor electrodes, and catalyst supports, particularly suited to combination with other 2d materials, such as layered double hydroxides. Comparative studies allow the response of nanocarbons with different dimensionalities to be assessed to identify fundamental trends and the most appropriate form for specific situations.   Charged Carbon Nanomaterials: Redox Chemistries of Fullerenes, Carbon Nanotubes, and GraphenesCHEMICAL REVIEWS, Vol: 118, Pages: 7363-7408, 2018   Fast Exfoliation and Functionalisation of Two-Dimensional Crystalline Carbon Nitride by Framework ChargingANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION, Vol: 57, Pages: 12656-12660, 2018   Thermochemical functionalisation of graphenes with minimal framework damageCHEMICAL SCIENCE, Vol: 8, Pages: 6149-6154, 2017
Bio: Milo Shaffer is Professor of Materials Chemistry at Imperial College London, and co-Director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology. He has extensive experience of carbon and inorganic nanomaterials synthesis, modification, characterization, and application, particularly for nanocomposite and hierarchical systems. Key applications are structural composites, electrochemical electrodes, and functional thin films. MS completed his PhD and a Research Fellowship at the University of Cambridge, and has previously worked as a materials technology consultant in the areas of new technology development and exploitation, and has filed around 30 patents/applications, eight of which have been licensed commercially. He has published well nearly 200 peer-reviewed papers with a total of over 15,000 citations, h-Index 57. He was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Meldola medal in 2005, a prestigious EPSRC Leadership Fellowship in 2008, and RSC Corday-Morgan medal in 2014. He sits editorial boards of Nanocomposites & International Materials Reviews, and has helped to organise a number of international nano-related meetings, including several of the Nanotube series, CNP-COMP, and a Faraday Discussion on Advanced Carbon.


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to be announced

Prof. Fabian Theis, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich (D)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
 
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Deep Neural Networks in Electron Microscopy of Quantum Materials: From Learning Physics to Atomic Manipulation

Prof Sergei Kalinin, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory USA

Atomically-resolved imaging of materials has become the mainstay of modern materials science, as enabled by advent of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). However, the wealth of quantitative information contained in the fine details of atomic structure or spectra remains largely unexplored. In this talk, I will present the new opportunities enabled by physics-informed big data and machine learning technologies to extract physical information from static and dynamic STEM images. The deep learning models trained on theoretically simulated images or labeled library data demonstrate extremely high efficiency in extracting atomic coordinates and trajectories, converting massive volumes of statistical and dynamic data into structural descriptors. I further present a method to take advantage of atomic-scale observations of chemical and structural fluctuations and use them to build a generative model (including near-neighbor interactions) that can be used to predict the phase diagram of the system in a finite temperature and composition space. Similar approach is applied to probe the kinetics of solid-state reactions on a single defect level and defect formation in solids via atomic-scale observations. Finally, synergy of deep learning image analytics and real-time feedback further allows harnessing beam-induced atomic and bond dynamics to enable direct atom-by-atom fabrication. Examples of direct atomic motion over mesoscopic distances, engineered doping at selected lattice site, and assembly of multiatomic structures will be demonstrated. These advances position STEM towards transition from purely imaging tool for atomic-scale laboratory of electronic, phonon, and quantum phenomena in atomically-engineered structures.
This research was sponsored by the Division of Basic Energy Sciences, BES, DOE, and was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division.
Bio: Sergei V. Kalinin is the director of the ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials and distinguished research staff member at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as a theme leader for Electronic and Ionic Functionality on the Nanoscale (at ORNL since 2002). He also holds a Joint Associate Professor position at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and an Adjunct Faculty position at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include application of big data, deep data, and smart data approaches in atomically resolved and mesoscopic imaging to guide the development of advanced materials for energy and information technologies, as well as coupling between electromechanical, electrical, and transport phenomena on the nanoscale. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002, followed by a Wigner fellowship at ORNL (2002-2004). He is a recipient of the Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists (2018); RMS medal for Scanning Probe Microscopy (2015); Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) (2009); IEEE-UFFC Ferroelectrics Young Investigator Award (2010); Burton medal of Microscopy Society of America (2010); ISIF Young Investigator Award (2009); American Vacuum Society Peter Mark Memorial Award (2008); R&D100 Awards (2008 and 2010); Ross Coffin Award (2003); Robert L. Coble Award of American Ceramics Society (2009); and a number of other distinctions. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed journal papers, edited 3 books, and holds more than 10 patents. He has organized numerous symposia (including symposia on Scanning Probe Microscopy on Materials Research Society Fall meeting in 2004, 2007, and 2009) and workshops (including International workshop series on PFM and Nanoferroelectrics), and acted as consultant for companies such as Intel and several Scanning Probe Microscopy manufacturers. He is also a member of editorial boards for several international journals, including Nanotechnology, Journal of Applied Physics/Applied Physics Letters, and recently established Nature Partner Journal Computational Materials.


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TBA

Dr. Kimberley Bonger, Radboud University, Netherlands

The Bonger lab combines organic chemistry with molecular biology and biochemistry to target and answer biological questions related to autoimmune- and protein misfolding diseases. Active projects include Coordination-Assisted Bioorthogonal ChemistrySelective targeting of autoreactive B-cells and Chemoenzymatic subcellular protein labeling.


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Dynamic optics for laser microfabrication and high-resolution microscopy

Prof. Dr. Martin Booth
University of Oxford

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/351365168

Abstract: I will review recent work on using dynamic optical elements, such as deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators, to increase the capabilities of laser micro fabrication and optical microscopy.  In particular, I will show how adaptive aberration correction and dynamic parallelisation can improve precision and reliability and increase the accessible volume and speed of these systems. Applications of our laser writing technology range from quantum optics, through radiation sensing to security marking of diamond gemstones. Our imaging methods include applications in cell biology, neuroscience and super-resolution microscopy. 

Bio: Prof Booth is Professor of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford. His research group is based in the Department of Engineering Science and has many collaborations in other departments across Oxford. His research involves the development and application of adaptive optical methods in microscopy, laser-based materials processing and biomedical science.  In 2012 Prof Booth was awarded the “Young Researcher Award in Optical Technologies” from the Erlangen School of Advanced Optical Technologies at the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, and a visiting professorship at the university. In 2014 he was awarded the International Commission for Optics Prize. He was appointed Professor of Engineering Science in 2014. He has over one hundred publications in peer-reviewed journals, over fifteen patents, and has co-founded two spin-off companies, Aurox Ltd and Opsydia Ltd

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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2019 World Conference of Science Journalists



The 11th World Conference of Science Journalists will be held from July 1st to July 5th, 2019, in Lausanne.


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CMOS Microelectronics for DNA detection using Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors

Prof. Dr. Pantelis Georgiou
Imperial College London

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/983964754

Abstract: In the last decade, we have seen a convergence of microelectronics into the world of healthcare providing novel solutions for early detection, diagnosis and therapy of disease. This has been made possible due to the emergence of CMOS technology, allowing fabrication of advanced systems with complete integration of sensors, instrumentation and processing, enabling design of miniaturised medical devices which operate with low-power. This has been specifically beneficial for the application areas of DNA based diagnostics and full genome sequencing, where the implementation of chemical sensors known as Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) directly in CMOS has enabled the design of large-scale arrays of millions of sensors that can conduct in-parallel detection of DNA. Furthermore, the scaling of CMOS with Moore’s law and the integration capability with microfluidics has enabled commercial efforts to make full genome sequencing affordable and therefore deployable in hospitals and research labs.
 
In this talk, I present how my lab is advancing the areas of DNA detection and rapid diagnostics through the design of CMOS based Lab-on-Chip systems using ISFETs. I will first introduce the fundamentals and physical properties of DNA as a target molecule and how it can be detected using different modalities through the use of CMOS technology. I will then present methods of design of ISFET sensors and instrumentation in CMOS, in addition to the challenges and limitations that exist for fabrication, providing solutions to allow design of large-scale ISFET arrays for real-time DNA amplification and detection systems. I will conclude with the presentation of state-of-the-art CMOS systems that are currently being used for genomics and point-of-care diagnostics, and the results of our latest fabricated multi-sensor CMOS platform for rapid screening of infectious disease and management of antimicrobial resistance.

Bio: Pantelis Georgiou currently holds the position of Reader (Associate Professor) at Imperial College London within the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is the head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory in the Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology; a multi-disciplinary group that invents, develops and demonstrates advanced micro-devices to meet global challenges in biomedical science and healthcare. His research includes ultra-low power micro-electronics, bio-inspired circuits and systems, lab-on-chip technology and application of micro-electronic technology to create novel medical devices. Application areas of his research include new technologies for treatment of diabetes such as the artificial pancreas, novel Lab-on-Chip technology for genomics and diagnostics targeted towards infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and wearable technologies for rehabilitation of chronic conditions.
 
Dr. Georgiou graduated with a 1st Class Honours MEng Degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2004 and Ph.D. degree in 2008 both from Imperial College London. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering as Research Associate until 2010, when he was appointed Head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory. In 2011, he joined the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, where he currently holds an academic faculty position. He conducted pioneering work on the silicon beta cell and is now leading the project forward to the development of the first bio-inspired artificial pancreas for treatment of Type I diabetes. In addition to this, he made significant contributions to the development of integrated chemical-sensing systems in CMOS. He has pioneered the development of the Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistor, an integrated pH sensor which is currently being used in next generation DNA sequencing machines, demonstrating for the first time its use in low-power weak-inversion, and its capability in a multimodal sensing array for Lab-on-Chip applications. Dr. Georgiou is a senior member of the IEEE and IET and serves on the BioCAS and Sensory Systems technical committees of the IEEE CAS Society. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors and TBioCAS journals. He is also the CAS representative on the IEEE sensors council. In 2013 he was awarded the IET Mike Sergeant Achievement Medal for his outstanding contributions to engineering and development of the bio-inspired artificial pancreas. In 2017, he was also awarded the IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement award. He is an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in Circuits and Systems.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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GaN for the Future

Prof. Dr. Debbie Senesky
Stanford University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/165147980

Abstract: There has been a tremendous amount of research and industrial investment in gallium nitride (GaN) as it is positioned to replace silicon in the billion-dollar (USD) power electronics industry, as well as the post-Moore microelectronics universe. In addition, the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for pioneering research in GaN that led to the realization of the energy-efficient blue light-emitting diode (LED). Furthermore, GaN electronics have operated at temperatures as high as 1000°C making it a viable platform for robust space-grade electronics and nano-satellites.  Even with these major technological breakthroughs, we have just begun the “GaN revolution.” New communities are adopting this platform for a multitude of emerging device applications including the following: sensing, energy harvesting, actuation, communication, and photonics.  In this talk, we will review and discuss the benefits of GaN’s two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) over silicon’s p-n junction for these new and emerging applications.  In addition, we will discuss opportunities for transformational development of this semiconductor device platform (e.g., interface engineering, thermal metrology, selective-area doping) to realize future GaN-based electronic systems.
 
Bio: Debbie G. Senesky is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and by courtesy, the Electrical Engineering Department. In addition, she is the Principal Investigator of the EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory (XLab).  Her research interests include the development of micro- and nano-scale sensors, high-temperature wide bandgap (GaN, SiC) electronics, and robust interface materials for operation within extreme harsh environments.   She received the B.S. degree (2001) in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California. She received the M.S. degree (2004) and Ph.D. degree (2007) in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition, she has held positions at GE Sensing (formerly known as NovaSensor), GE Global Research Center, and Hewlett Packard.  She has served on the program committee of the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (Transducers), and International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S).  She is currently co-editor for IEEE Electron Device Letters, Sensors (journal), and Micromachines (journal).   In recognition of her work, she is a recipient of the Emerging Leader Abie Award from AnitaB.org, NASA Early Faculty Career Award, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Ph.D. Fellowship Award. More information about Prof. Senesky can be found at xlab.stanford.edu or on Instagram/Twitter: @debbiesenesky.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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to be announced

Prof. Richard E. Lenski, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Education:
1973-76    B.A., Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (USA)
1977-82    Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Positions:
1982-85    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA)
1984        Visiting Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (USA)
1985-88    Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1988-91    Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1991-        Hannah Professor of Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)
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Flexible Radios and Flexible Networks

Prof. Dr. Alyssa B. Apsel,
Cornell University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/637254875

Abstract: Over the past decades the world has become increasingly connected, with communications driving both markets and social movements.  Low power electronics, efficient communications, and better battery technology have all contributed to this revolution, but the cost and power required for these systems must be pushed further to make cheap, ubiquitous, seamless communication accessible to a wider community.   In this talk I will discuss two engineering approaches to this problem.  I will look at various approaches to drive the power down in radio networks that span across circuits and systems.  I will also look at creative biologically inspired approaches to enabling very low power networks and IoT.  Finally, I will discuss how by adding flexibility and building reconfigurable hardware, we can likewise build lower power and less costly consumer systems that can adapt across protocols and networks and work under changing device technologies.

Bio: Alyssa Apsel received the B.S. from Swarthmore College in 1995 and the Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, in 2002.  She joined Cornell University in 2002, where she is currently Director of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  She was a Visiting Professor at Imperial College, London from 2016-2018.  The focus of her research is on power-aware mixed signal circuits and design for highly scaled CMOS and modern electronic systems.  Her current research is on the leading edge of ultra-low power and flexible RF interfaces for IoT.  She has authored or coauthored over 100 refereed publications including one book in related fields of RF mixed signal circuit design, ultra-low power radio, interconnect design and planning, photonic integration, and process invariant circuit design techniques resulting in ten patents.  She received best paper awards at ASYNC 2006 and IEEE SiRF 2012, had a MICRO “Top Picks” paper in 2006, received a college teaching award in 2007, received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2004, and was selected by Technology Review Magazine as one of the Top Young Innovators in 2004.  She is a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE CAS for 2018-2019, and has also served on the Board of Governors of IEEE CAS (2014-2016) and as an Associate Editor of various journals including IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I and II, and Transactions on VLSI.  She has also served as the chair of the Analog and Signal Processing Technical committee of ISCAS 2011, is on the Senior Editorial Board of JETCAS, as Deputy Editor in Chief of Circuits and Systems Magazine, and as the co-founder and Chair of ISCAS Late Breaking News.  In 2016, Dr. Apsel co-founded AlphaWave IP Corporation, a multi-national Silicon IP provider focused on multi-standard analog Silicon IP solutions for the world of IOT.  As Chief Technology Officer of AlphaWave, Dr. Apsel led the company’s global research capability with offices in Silicon Valley, Toronto, and London. 

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Merging Humans and Machines with Hydrogel Technology

Prof. Dr. Xuanhe Zhao,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/385971995

Abstract: While human tissues and organs are mostly soft, wet and bioactive; machines are commonly hard, dry and biologically inert. Bridging human-machine interfaces is of imminent importance in addressing grand societal challenges in healthcare, security, sustainability, education and joy of living. However, interfacing human and machines is extremely challenging due to their fundamentally contradictory properties. At MIT SAMs Lab, we propose to harness “hydrogel technology” to form long-term, high-efficacy, compatible and seamless interfaces between humans and machines. On one side, hydrogels with similar mechanical and physiological properties as tissues and organs can naturally integrate with human body over the long term, greatly alleviating the foreign body response and mechanical mismatches. On the other side, the hydrogels with intrinsic or integrated electrodes, optical fibers, sensors, actuators and circuits can effectively bridge external machines and human bodies via electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical interactions. In this talk, I will first discuss the mechanisms to design extreme properties for hydrogels, including tough, resilient, adhesive, strong and antifatigue, for long-term robust human-machine interfaces.  Then I will discuss a set of novel hydrogel devices that interface with the human body, including i). hydrogel neural probes capable of electro-opto-fluidic interrogation of single neurons in mice over life time; ii). ingestible hydrogel pills capable of continuously monitoring core-body physiological conditions over a month;  and iii). untethered fast and forceful hydrogel robots controlled by magnetic fields for minimal invasive operations. I will conclude the talk by proposing a systematic approach to design next-generation human-machine interfaces based on hydrogel technology.

Bio: Xuanhe Zhao is an associate professor in mechanical engineering at MIT. His research group designs soft materials that possess unprecedented properties to address grant societal challenges. Dr. Zhao is the recipient of the early career award and young investigator award from National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Society of Engineering Science, American Vacuum Society, Adhesion Society, Materials Today, Journal of Applied Mechanics, and Extreme Mechanics Letters. He held the Hunt Faculty Scholar at Duke, and the d'Arbeloff Career Development Chair and Noyce Career Development Professor at MIT. He was selected as a highly cited researcher by Web of Science in 2018.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Dr. Silvano De Franceschi - IMT Distinguished Lecture

Dr. Silvano De Franceschi
CEA-INAC


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/982557518

Abstract and Bio to follow.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program


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to be announced

Prof. Jussi Taipale, Cambridge University (UK)

BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.
 
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