Upcoming Seminars and Events

Neuromodulation of Neural Microcircuits NM² conference



The Blue Brain Project is delighted to announce that it will be hosting the second Neuromodulation of Neural Microcircuits NM² conference led by Srikanth Ramaswamy and Henry Markram. It will take place on May 24 – 26, in Champéry, Valais.

The overarching goal of the second NM² Conference is to provide a unifying and mechanistic view by which an ever-increasing number of neuromodulators, including monoamines, and peptides – the master switches – control genes, proteins, neurons and glia, dendrites, synapses, and emergent states in neural microcircuits across different brain regions in health and disease.
 
Building such a mechanistic view of neuromodulation encounters several fundamental challenges to consider:

  1. How do sensory signals, internal brain states, and computations in microcircuits, trigger the release of specific neuromodulators?
  2. How do neuronal assemblies and larger brain circuits respond to neuromodulators?
  3. How do neuromodulators shape synaptic plasticity and brain states?
To this end, the NM² Conference will bring together researchers to bridge a variety of disciplines using state-of-the-art techniques in different brain regions, towards the common goal of understanding the mechanisms and principles of neuromodulation and addressing the challenges above.
 
Our fundamental objective is to organize a dynamic conference that will highlight an up-to-date view of the neuromodulation of brain states, establish future directions, and attract new talent to drive forward this important field.
 
REGISTRATION
 
To register for the Conference, please click here
 
Please register as soon as possible; only a limited number of seats are available.
 
POSTER ABSTRACTS
 
When submitting an abstract PhD students and Postdocs are encouraged to apply for Blue Brain travel awards to participate in the NM2 Conference. Awards, which are only open to those who submit abstracts, include registration for the Conference (including accommodation and full board), and travel support. Some of the submitted abstracts will be selected for flash talks.
 
 
Please feel free to contact Dace Stiebrina should you have any questions concerning the conference.
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EE Distinguished Lecturer Seminar: The Nitride Semiconductor Revolution: Over, or Just Getting Started?

Dr. Debdeep Jena is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University.  He joined Cornell in 2015 from the faculty at Notre Dame where he was since August 2003, shortly after earning the Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).  His research and teaching interests are in the MBE growth and device applications of quantum semiconductor heterostructures (III-V nitrides, oxides, and 2D materials), and in charge, heat, and spin transport in nanomaterials.  He has authored more than 200 scientific publications including articles in Science, Nature Journals, Physical Review Letters, Electron Device Letters, and Applied Physics Letters.  During his research career, he has received the International MBE Young Scientist award in 2014, the IBM faculty award in 2012, the ISCS Young Scientist award in 2012, the most valuable contribution awards at the Workshop for Compound Semiconductor Materials and Devices (WOCSEMMAD) in 2014, 2010 and 2008, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award in 2006.  He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

Abstract: Nitride semiconductors have revolutionized solid-state lighting.  They are leading the charge in electronics as high frequency amplifiers for high speed 5G communication systems, as well as fast switching, high-voltage electronics.  They are slowly creating the materials and device platform for deep-ultraviolet photonics in the future.  Even more futuristic are applications that combine the excellent electronics and photonics capabilities of nitride semiconductors with epitaxial nitride metals and superconductors for quantum communication links and for making new kinds of qubits.  I will discuss the “old" and the new nitride materials and devices, comparing and contrasting them, and argue why the nitride semiconductor revolution is just getting started.
 
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Single-Molecule Bioanalytics with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

Alexandre Fürstenberg, Ph.D., Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)

BIOENGINEERING SEMINAR
 
Abstract:
Molecular interactions are at the heart of chemistry and biology. Understanding their fundamentals in complex biological processes is essential to help fight diseases and develop new drugs in an educated way. Single-molecule fluorescence techniques, especially when coupled to methods enabling a good spatial and/or temporal resolution, are in principle uniquely suited to follow and quantify molecular interactions in biological systems because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence signal to the direct environment of the probe. However, to be truly quantitative, a fluorescent sensor requires that the origin of the modulation of the fluorescence signal (intensity, lifetime, …) during a change in the interaction of interest be fully understood and therefore that the intrinsic photophysics of the probe be well characterized.
My talk will cover two research areas for which we have been developing such quantitative fluorescence single-molecule sensors. Firstly, I will show that, when it comes to the choice of a fluorophore to tag a biomolecule, it is often overlooked that water, which is ubiquitous in a biological environment, is a weak, yet well-known fluorescence quencher. Nonetheless, understanding the quenching mechanism enabled us to design ways to improve the resolution in super-resolution experiments and to use standard fluorescent dyes to quantify the number of water molecules in the direct environment of the fluorophore. In the second part, I will focus on our application of single-molecule techniques and development of novel imaging, labeling and analysis methods with the goal of improving our understanding of the function and dynamics of G protein-coupled receptors, the largest family of membrane proteins in humans which and which are targeted by ~40% of currently available medicines.

Bio:
Alexandre Fürstenberg studied chemistry and biochemistry at the Universities of Lausanne and Geneva in Switzerland. He specialized in photochemistry and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecules with Eric Vauthey at the University of Geneva (PhD 2007) before moving into single-molecule spectroscopy and imaging as a postdoc with W. E. Moerner at Stanford University (2008-2010). In 2010, he started his independent research thanks to an Ambizione fellowship of the Swiss National Science Foundation at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva. After further research stays as a visiting assistant professor at The Rockefeller University in New York in the Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Signal Transduction led by Thomas P. Sakmar (2014-2016) and at the Goethe University Frankfurt in the group of Mike Heilemann (2016), he held a lecturing appointment at the University of Fribourg. Since 2017, he has been a senior lecturer at the University of Geneva in the Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry. His research focuses on the development and application of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy tools, with an emphasis on quantitative single-molecule fluorescence sensors for biology to investigate the dynamics of G protein-coupled receptors.
 


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CANCELLED

Prof. Fabian Theis, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich (D)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
To be provided.

Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/659834980
 
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Deep Neural Networks in Electron Microscopy of Quantum Materials: From Learning Physics to Atomic Manipulation

Prof Sergei Kalinin, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory USA

Atomically-resolved imaging of materials has become the mainstay of modern materials science, as enabled by advent of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). However, the wealth of quantitative information contained in the fine details of atomic structure or spectra remains largely unexplored. In this talk, I will present the new opportunities enabled by physics-informed big data and machine learning technologies to extract physical information from static and dynamic STEM images. The deep learning models trained on theoretically simulated images or labeled library data demonstrate extremely high efficiency in extracting atomic coordinates and trajectories, converting massive volumes of statistical and dynamic data into structural descriptors. I further present a method to take advantage of atomic-scale observations of chemical and structural fluctuations and use them to build a generative model (including near-neighbor interactions) that can be used to predict the phase diagram of the system in a finite temperature and composition space. Similar approach is applied to probe the kinetics of solid-state reactions on a single defect level and defect formation in solids via atomic-scale observations. Finally, synergy of deep learning image analytics and real-time feedback further allows harnessing beam-induced atomic and bond dynamics to enable direct atom-by-atom fabrication. Examples of direct atomic motion over mesoscopic distances, engineered doping at selected lattice site, and assembly of multiatomic structures will be demonstrated. These advances position STEM towards transition from purely imaging tool for atomic-scale laboratory of electronic, phonon, and quantum phenomena in atomically-engineered structures.
This research was sponsored by the Division of Basic Energy Sciences, BES, DOE, and was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division.
Bio: Sergei V. Kalinin is the director of the ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials and distinguished research staff member at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as a theme leader for Electronic and Ionic Functionality on the Nanoscale (at ORNL since 2002). He also holds a Joint Associate Professor position at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and an Adjunct Faculty position at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include application of big data, deep data, and smart data approaches in atomically resolved and mesoscopic imaging to guide the development of advanced materials for energy and information technologies, as well as coupling between electromechanical, electrical, and transport phenomena on the nanoscale. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002, followed by a Wigner fellowship at ORNL (2002-2004). He is a recipient of the Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists (2018); RMS medal for Scanning Probe Microscopy (2015); Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) (2009); IEEE-UFFC Ferroelectrics Young Investigator Award (2010); Burton medal of Microscopy Society of America (2010); ISIF Young Investigator Award (2009); American Vacuum Society Peter Mark Memorial Award (2008); R&D100 Awards (2008 and 2010); Ross Coffin Award (2003); Robert L. Coble Award of American Ceramics Society (2009); and a number of other distinctions. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed journal papers, edited 3 books, and holds more than 10 patents. He has organized numerous symposia (including symposia on Scanning Probe Microscopy on Materials Research Society Fall meeting in 2004, 2007, and 2009) and workshops (including International workshop series on PFM and Nanoferroelectrics), and acted as consultant for companies such as Intel and several Scanning Probe Microscopy manufacturers. He is also a member of editorial boards for several international journals, including Nanotechnology, Journal of Applied Physics/Applied Physics Letters, and recently established Nature Partner Journal Computational Materials.


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Bacterial growth laws and the origin of dimensional reduction

Prof. Terry Hwa, University of California, San Diego

Extensive quantitative experiments on the model bacterium /E. coli/ have established that many bacterial behaviors are organized in simple manners in accordance to the rate of cell growth. The existence of these simple empirical relations (growth laws) despite myriads of complex molecular interactions is a striking manifestations of a tremendous degree of dimensional reduction occurring in living cells.  I will describe how the growth laws can be used to make accurate predictions of cell behaviors and discuss how the magic of dimensional reduction can be accomplished by cells through clever strategies of gene regulation.
 


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[ Swiss Research Foundation for Electricity and Mobile Communication | Workshop on Millimeter waves ]



Registrations are open until May 28 for the Swiss Research Foundation for Electricity and Mobile Communication (FSM) Workshop on “Millimetre waves - state of the art in research”.
The workshop will be held in Zurich on 18 and 19 June 2019.
 
Millimetre waves (MMW) will most likely be used in Europe by 5G mobile phone technology in a few years' time. The workshop will present the state-of-the-art knowledge on millimetre wave biological effects, explain the metrology and modeling challenges, and will guide the ongoing discussions on standardization and limits.
 
Furthermore, there will be plenty of opportunities to discuss and network.
 
The workshop is aimed at people from the public administration, industry, science, civil society and the media, who are interested in the upcoming mobile radio technology based on the so-called millimetre waves. This frequency range is not yet completely standardized and approved. The workshop will present the state of the art in millimetre wave biological effects, highlight challenges in modeling the interaction of these waves with the skin, and inform about the state of regulation in terms of frequency usage and health protection.
 
Note that some presentations will be in English, most, however, in German.
 
Where:
ETH-Zürich, Rämistrasse 101
Raum HG G 5
Tram Nr. 6, Bahnhofplatz – ETH
 
For further information, please have a look at the programme of the workshop and at FSM’s webpage.
 
For registrations:
  • The participation fee is CHF 250 for EPFL participants.
  • Send an e-mail to Krisztina Meya (krisztina@emf.ethz.ch) by 28 May 2019.
 
For information regarding the future FSM call for proposals, have a look at the call webpage and at the EPFL memento.
 
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IGM Colloquium: On the shape of water

Prof. David Quéré, ESPCI & École Polytechnique, Paris, France

Abstract:
While water and liquids at large are sometimes defined as materials without proper shape, surface tension at small scale dominates gravity and imposes special configurations - such as spheres. We’ll discuss how the control of the shape of water allows us to induce special properties - such as reduced friction, fast bouncing, anti-fogging and propulsion.
 
Bio:
David Quéré is a physicist interested in soft matter and fluid mechanics - with a particular interest in interfacial hydrodynamics. He shares his time between the lab (with a group of remarkable PhD students), his teaching duties (Polytechnique, mainly, but also Tsinghua in China), and companies (Saint-Gobain and Sanofi, for instance). His research is mainly based on natural observations and applied questions.
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Regulation of immune tolerance to the intestinal microbiota

Caspar Ohnmacht, Centre for Allergy and Environment, Technical University and Helmholtz Zentrum, Munich

The host and the symbiotic microbiota within the intestine live in close association with each other. Setting up this symbiosis requires mutiple regulatory circuits from both the host and the microbiome side. Particularly, adaptive immunity including T cells need to be tolerized to prevent constant immune activation upon recognition of harmless microbes. We have identified one of the key cell types mediating this immune tolerance, namely the so-called ROR(γt)regulatory T cells. These cells are induced locally within the intestinal tract and are critical to induce oral tolerance and regulate inflammatory bowel disease as well as type 2 immune disorders, e.g. allergies. Both microbial factors and host pathways affecting the differentiation of ROR(γt)Tregs and therefore intestinal homeostasis will be discussed. Furthermore this concept opens the way for the identification of microbial 'dysbiosis' without the need to fully characterize complex microbial communities. 
 


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Chemical surface analysis, a new platform for the Laboratory of Advanced Technology

Andras Kiss
 

 
After a short presentation of the Laboratory of Advanced Technology, we will give you an overview of the capabilities of our new platform dedicated to chemical surface analysis. This platform offers a deep expertise in chemical analysis as well as a park of cutting-edge equipments.  The arrival of two new systems is the opportunity for us to present the capabilities of the state-of-the-art PHI nanoTOF II TOF-SIMS mass spectrometer and PHI VersaProbe III Scanning XPS Microprobe with possible applications in your research field.
 


 


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Molecular Resolution in Optical Nanoscopy by Breaking the Information Barrier

Dr. Francisco Balzarotti

Super-resolution microscopy methods such as STED and PALM/STORM have revolutionized far-field optical fluorescence microscopy by going beyond the diffraction limit of light and offering potentially unlimited resolution. In practice, however, the resolution of an image is limited by the finite photon budget of fluorescent probes, while their finite emission rate imposes a spatio-temporal trade-off in tracking applications. 
 
By synergistically combining the strengths of both super-resolution families, the recently introduced MINFLUX concept tackles these limitations by rendering each emitted photon more informative. MINFLUX localizes an emitter by repeatedly probing its location with an excitation beam that features a zero of intensity. The emitter position is obtained from the knowledge of the beam shape and the number of photons collected at each location of the beam. When compared to conventional centroid-localization techniques, it is possible to reach a given precision by using fewer photons, or conversely, have an improved precision for the same photon budget.
 
In this seminar, I will present the foundations of super resolution optical microscopy and build up towards how MINFLUX works. I will discuss published results in nanoscopy (~1 nm resolution) and single molecule tracking and show recent extensions of the technique for multicolor three-dimensional operation within large fields of view for fixed and living cells.
 


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Bringing Orthogonality in the Tetrazine Ligation with (strained) alkenes

Dr. Kimberley Bonger, Radboud University, Netherlands

The development of bioorthogonal reactions made it possible to visualize and study biomolecules in their native cellular context and contributed to advanced targeted drug delivery strategies. Bonger's research group is interested in developing novel bioorthogonal chemistry and apply this in the targeting of specific cell types. They recently added non-strained, highly soluble and stable vinylboronic acids (VBA) as reactants to the bioorthogonal toolbox which react with tetrazines in an inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder reaction. They have observed exceptional high reaction rates between non-strained vinylboronic acids (VBAs) and dipyridyl tetrazines relative to that of tetrazines lacking such dative coordinating ligand. As VBAs are mild Lewis acids, they hypothesize that coordination of the pyridyl to the boronic acid promotes the tetrazine ligation. In the current presentation, they explore the scope and molecular origins of the observed VBA reactivity in more detail and benefit from its unique properties in the simultaneous orthogonal tetrazine labelling of proteins. In addition, they further extended the VBA toolbox as chemically-triggered cleavable linkers for targeted drug delivery with the specific focus on autoreactive B-cells.
 
References:
1) Selma Eising, Francis Lelivelt, Kimberly M. Bonger*. Vinylboronic Acids as Fast Reacting, Synthetically Accessible, and Stable Bioorthogonal Reactants in the Carboni–Lindsey Reaction. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, 55, 12243.
2) Selma Eising, Nicole van der Linden, Fleur Kleinpenning, Kimberly M. Bonger. Vinylboronic Acids as Efficient Bioorthogonal Reactants for Tetrazine Labeling in Living Cells. Bioconjug. Chem. 2018, 29, 982.
3) Selma Eising, Bo-Tao Xin, Fleur Kleinpenning, Jurriaan J. A. Heming, Bogdan I. Florea, Herman S. Overkleeft and Kimberly M. Bonger* Coordination-Assisted Bioorthogonal Chemistry: Orthogonal Tetrazine Ligation with Vinylboronic Acid and a Strained Alkene, ChemBioChem 2018, 15, 1648.

Biosketch :
Kimberly Bonger obtained her M.Sc degree in Organic Chemistry from the Free University in Amsterdam in 2002. In 2008 she received her PhD from Leiden University working under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Gijs van der Marel and Prof. Dr. Hermen Overkleeft on the design and synthesis of dimeric ligands for G-protein coupled receptors involved in human reproduction. After spending almost four years as a postdoc at Stanford University in the laboratory of Thomas Wandless working on molecular tools to control protein stability, she returned to the Netherlands as an assistant professor in Chemical Biology at the Radboud University in Nijmegen. Her research focusses on the development of novel bioorthogonal reactions and targeted drug delivery strategies as well as the fundamental understanding of cellular mechanisms involved in autoimmunity.
 


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The constant change in the scientific world

Prof Sergei Kalinin, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA

The EPFL Open Science initiative invites you to this presentation by Sergei V. Kalinin, director of the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA.

ABSTRACT
Science is now at the brink of transformational change brought by the big data and machine learning technologies. Technologies such as Facebook, Google, or Yelp, has drastically changed everyday life over last decade. Yet this transition is just beginning in the academic and consequently R&D worlds, largely due to the high heterogeneity of the tasks and goals in research community compared to the everyday life that preclude top-down developments and necessitates data background for domain scientists. In his presentation, Sergei Kalinin will discuss several examples of challenges and opportunities presented by open data and open codes. This transformation further calls us to re-evaluate the ways how we do science - individually and as a community. The tried and true concepts of scientific publication that emerged over last century will remain the mainstream of scientific process, but are poised to adopt significant changes, as enabled by availability of effective means to share raw and curated data, information, and codes, availability of new tools for automatic text generation and analysis, and emergence of social media platforms. Sergei will further discuss how data and paper mining can affect our understanding of scientific world, and building the top-down picture via citation and semantic analysis.  

Speaker's Bio:
Sergei V. Kalinin is the director of the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, distinguished research staff member at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) as well as a theme leader for Electronic and Ionic Functionality on the Nanoscale at the same institution. He also holds a Joint Associate Professor position at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and an Adjunct Faculty position at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include application of big data, deep data, and smart data approaches in atomically resolved and mesoscopic imaging to guide the development of advanced materials for energy and information technologies, as well as coupling between electromechanical, electrical, and transport phenomena on the nanoscale.
Website


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Multi-messenger optical microscopy

Prof. Alberto Diaspro

The possibility of integrating different light-matter interactions to form images and to correlate image data in optical microscopy is the starting point for the design and implementation of a brand new multi-messenger optical microscope. The multi-messenger microscope could represent a new paradigm in data collection and image formation with a potential high impact in biophysics exploiting the possibility to “tune” the microscope across a large, almost unlimited, range of spatial and temporal resolution. Confocal, multiphoton, image scanning and super resolved fluoresce microscopy can be comined with label free approaches, including multiphoton, SHG and Mueller matrix microscopy. The "field of battle" is related to for answering an open universal question in cellular and molecular biology: what are the local and global four-dimensional (x,y,z,t) chromatin structures in the nucleus that rule the compaction and function of the human genome in the interphase of cells and mitotic chromosomes? Within this scenario, expansion and light sheet microscopy will be considered as part of the multi-messenger approach. Liquid lenses, SPAD arrays and enforced deep learning approaches and brand new oriented detectors are key components for the development. The final “destination”of the multimodal collection of data is oriented to a “liquitopy” (liquid tunable microscopy) development [1]. [1] R. Won, “The super-resolution debate,” Nature Photonics, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 259–260, Apr. 2018.


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Unveiling the dynamic nature of cellular nanopores in living endothelial cells by video-rate super-resolution microscopy

Prof. Thomas Huser

Super-resolved structured illumination microscopy (SR-SIM) is among the most flexible, fastest and least perturbing fluorescence microscopy techniques capable of surpassing the optical diffraction limit. Current custom-built instruments are easily able to deliver two-fold resolution enhancement at video-rate frame rates, but the cost of the instruments is still relatively high and the physical size of the instruments is still prohibitively large. Here, I will present our latest efforts towards realizing a new generation of compact, cost-efficient and high-speed SR-SIM instruments. Tight integration of the structured illumination microscope capable of video-rate image acquisition with instant image reconstruction enables us to realize a super-resolving fluorescence microscope with the look-and-feel of regular wide-field microscopy. I will demonstrate this by presenting dynamics of intracellular transport and movement in living cells, in particular the dynamics of liver cell fenestrations. These nano-sized pores in liver endothelial cells play a particularly crucial role in human physiology, which is reduced or lost during disease and/or aging. To best address these issues from all perspectives, we utilize a suite of multimodal methods, e.g. the combination of optical tweezers with optical nanoscopy, or the combination of temporal and spatial methods of improving the spatial resolution and select the best possible method for each research question. I will present the pros and cons of these methods, their combination, and their applications on select biomedical examples.


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EPFLoop : Pod unveiling




Save the date! The EPFLoop Team is going to unveil Bella Lui, their new Pod, next May 29.

Join us for this event at 6pm on campus, at the Forum Rolex (Rolex Learning Center).

Please be aware that there will be only a limited number of spots for this event. Doors open at 5.30pm, so come early!

Can’t make it? Don’t worry, the event will be livestreamed – more information to come.

The EPFLoop Team

Thank you to our sponsors:
Platinum: Association des communes de Crans-Montana (ACCM), BOBST, Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
Gold: COMSOL-Multi Physics, Gurit
Major: BRUSA Elektronik AG, jobs.ch, Holy Cow! Gourmet Burger Company, Valélectric Farner SA, Meggitt, LEMO Connectors
Starter: National Instruments, Forum EPFL, Leclanché, Allite Inc, HHO, item Industrietechnik, LEM, Coloral, Storyboard Studio

The conference language is English.
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Automated mapping of multi-cellular motifs during tissue morphogenesis

Tomer Stern - In 2016 Tomer Stern received his Ph.D. in computational biology from the Weizmann institute of science in Israel. There, together with prof. Elazar Zelzer he focused on deciphering the developmental mechanisms regulating the morphology of the ossified bone and the cartilaginous template using the mouse model. Since 2017 he is a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University as well as an EMBO fellow, and together with Profs. Eric Wieschaus and Stas Shvartsman he is developing a unified quantitative approach for mining tissue behaviors from live images using the fruit fly model.


Research over the last decades has identified an increasing repertoire of conserved cellular behaviors, or “motifs”, that act as building blocks of tissue morphogenesis. However, a comprehensive framework for the exploration and analysis of these motifs, similar to the frameworks used to map and discover motifs in sequence data, is yet to be established. In this talk I will present our first step towards this goal by developing a generic algorithm that can learn to recognize any sub- to multi-cellular behavior from user provided examples, and accurately map its appearances in live imaging data. Our strategy relies on the transformation of the intricate geometry, topology and molecular expression profiles of cells in a developing tissue into time-series data, thereby allowing to address the problem as a subsequence matching task. Using this approach we mapped intercalary behaviors, namely T1-transitions and rosettes, during Drosophila germband extension in wild type embryos and embryos lacking the AP patterning information, revealing differences in the kinetics of junction contraction as compared to elongation. Moreover, using Monte-Carlo simulations we show that the frequencies of T1-transitions and 5- and 6-cell rosettes can be predicted by the spatial density of contracting junctions within the tissue.
We believe that in the future our approach will begin to play in the study of tissue development the same role as standard sequence analysis is playing in the discovery of regulatory interactions in DNA and protein data.
 
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Dynamic optics for laser microfabrication and high-resolution microscopy

Prof. Dr. Martin Booth
University of Oxford

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/351365168

Abstract: I will review recent work on using dynamic optical elements, such as deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators, to increase the capabilities of laser micro fabrication and optical microscopy.  In particular, I will show how adaptive aberration correction and dynamic parallelisation can improve precision and reliability and increase the accessible volume and speed of these systems. Applications of our laser writing technology range from quantum optics, through radiation sensing to security marking of diamond gemstones. Our imaging methods include applications in cell biology, neuroscience and super-resolution microscopy. 

Bio: Prof Booth is Professor of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford. His research group is based in the Department of Engineering Science and has many collaborations in other departments across Oxford. His research involves the development and application of adaptive optical methods in microscopy, laser-based materials processing and biomedical science.  In 2012 Prof Booth was awarded the “Young Researcher Award in Optical Technologies” from the Erlangen School of Advanced Optical Technologies at the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, and a visiting professorship at the university. In 2014 he was awarded the International Commission for Optics Prize. He was appointed Professor of Engineering Science in 2014. He has over one hundred publications in peer-reviewed journals, over fifteen patents, and has co-founded two spin-off companies, Aurox Ltd and Opsydia Ltd

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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T Cells Sans Frontières

Carolyn King, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel

Activated CD4 T cells have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of effector subsets. This diversification is required for the generation of specialized and pathogen appropriate T cell responses, as well as long-lived and protective memory T cells. Although CD4 memory T cells are clearly important to control various infections (i.e. tuberculosis), vaccines targeting the induction of polyfunctional memory cells have had only limited success. In some cases, CD4 memory T cells can also induce host detrimental effects, for example during chronic viral infection or after organ transplantation. We hypothesize that these divergent effects are dependent on heterogeneity within the CD4 memory T cell compartment, the plasticity of these cells following recall, and their localization relative to other cells or environmental signals. Thus, a major goal of our work is to elucidate the specific factors regulating CD4 memory T cell diversification and their relationship to host immunity. We are using several infection models as well as complementary microscopy approaches to assess the dynamics and flexibility of T cell differentiation.


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Conférence « Les missions Apollo et le retour sur la Lune »

Chloé Carrière, présidente de l’association Space@yourService

A l’occasion du 50ème anniversaire de l'alunissage, la Bibliothèque de l’EPFL organise, en collaboration avec l’association Space@yourService, une série de 4 conférence pour inaugurer l’exposition « We choose to go to the Moon ». Présentée au Rolex Learning Center du 1er juin au 20 août 2019, l'exposition rend hommage aux milliers d’hommes et de femmes, mathématicien-e-s, ingénieur-e-s, physicien-e-s, technicien-e-s qui ont contribué à rendre le rêve de la conquête lunaire réalité. Les conférences auront lieu chaque jour du 3 au 6 juin, dès 12h, au Rolex Learning Center (zone à proximité de la cafétéria Le Klee by Takinoa). 

Programme des conférences

  • 3 Juin 2019
    « Les missions Apollo et le retour sur la Lune »
    Par Chloé Carrière, présidente de l’association Space@yourService
     
  • 4 Juin 2019
    « Les 50 ans de l’Homme sur la Lune »
    Par Claude Nicollier, astronaute et Professeur honoraire
    Inscriptions
     
  • 5 Juin 2019
    « Trous noirs et premières images »
    Par Pascale Jablonka, Professeure au Laboratoire d’astrophysique
     
  • 6 Juin 2019
    « Demandez la Lune ! Évolution de la perception humaine de la Lune »
    Par Georges Meylan, Professeur honoraire d’astrophysique et de cosmologie

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Scaling down the laws of thermodynamics

Prof. Christopher Jarzynski, University of Maryland

Thermodynamics provides a robust conceptual framework and set of laws that govern the exchange of energy and matter.  Although these laws were originally articulated for macroscopic objects, it is hard to deny that nanoscale systems often exhibit “thermodynamic-like” behavior – biomolecular motors convert chemical fuel into mechanical work (like car engines), and individual polymer molecules exhibit hysteresis and dissipation when stretched and contracted (like rubber bands).  To what extent can the macroscopic laws of thermodynamics be “scaled down” to apply to individual microscopic systems, and what new features emerge there at the nanoscale?  I will review recent progress toward answering these questions, with a particular focus on the second law of thermodynamics.
 


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Conférence « Les 50 ans de l’Homme sur la Lune »

Claude Nicollier, astronaute et Professeur honoraire

A l’occasion du 50ème anniversaire de l'alunissage, la Bibliothèque de l’EPFL organise, en collaboration avec l’association Space@yourService, une série de 4 conférence pour inaugurer l’exposition « We choose to go to the Moon ». Présentée au Rolex Learning Center du 1er juin au 20 août 2019, l'exposition rend hommage aux milliers d’hommes et de femmes, mathématicien-e-s, ingénieur-e-s, physicien-e-s, technicien-e-s qui ont contribué à rendre le rêve de la conquête lunaire réalité. Les conférences auront lieu chaque jour du 3 au 6 juin, dès 12h, au Rolex Learning Center (zone à proximité de la cafétéria Le Klee by Takinoa). 

Programme des conférences

  • 3 Juin 2019
    « Les missions Apollo et le retour sur la Lune »
    Par Chloé Carrière, présidente de l’association Space@yourService
     
  • 4 Juin 2019
    « Les 50 ans de l’Homme sur la Lune »
    Par Claude Nicollier, astronaute et Professeur honoraire
    Inscriptions
     
  • 5 Juin 2019
    « Trous noirs et premières images »
    Par Pascale Jablonka, Professeure au Laboratoire d’astrophysique
     
  • 6 Juin 2019
    « Demandez la Lune ! Évolution de la perception humaine de la Lune »
    Par Georges Meylan, Professeur honoraire d’astrophysique et de cosmologie

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Conférence « L’évolution de la Lune en Astrophysique et en exploration spatiale »

Pascale Jablonka, Professeure au Laboratoire d’astrophysique

A l’occasion du 50ème anniversaire de l'alunissage, la Bibliothèque de l’EPFL organise, en collaboration avec l’association Space@yourService, une série de 4 conférence pour inaugurer l’exposition « We choose to go to the Moon ». Présentée au Rolex Learning Center du 1er juin au 20 août 2019, l'exposition rend hommage aux milliers d’hommes et de femmes, mathématicien-e-s, ingénieur-e-s, physicien-e-s, technicien-e-s qui ont contribué à rendre le rêve de la conquête lunaire réalité. Les conférences auront lieu chaque jour du 3 au 6 juin, dès 12h, au Rolex Learning Center (zone à proximité de la cafétéria Le Klee by Takinoa). 

Programme des conférences

  • 3 Juin 2019
    « Les missions Apollo et le retour sur la Lune »
    Par Chloé Carrière, présidente de l’association Space@yourService
     
  • 4 Juin 2019
    « Les 50 ans de l’Homme sur la Lune »
    Par Claude Nicollier, astronaute et Professeur honoraire
    Inscriptions
     
  • 5 Juin 2019
    « Trous noirs et premières images »
    Par Pascale Jablonka, Professeure au Laboratoire d’astrophysique
     
  • 6 Juin 2019
    « Demandez la Lune ! Évolution de la perception humaine de la Lune »
    Par Georges Meylan, Professeur honoraire d’astrophysique et de cosmologie

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IC Research Day - Digital Trust



Trust is indispensable to the prosperity and well-being of societies. For millennia, we developed trust-building mechanisms to facilitate interactions. But as they become increasingly digital, many traditional mechanisms no longer function well, hence trust breaks down. As a result, low levels of trust discourage us from engaging in new forms of interactions and constrain business opportunities. We must therefore re-invent trust mechanisms that will contribute to prosperous and peaceful societies in the digital age.
    
At this year's IC Research Day, world-leading experts will present and discuss their work toward achieving these goals. EPFL researchers will showcase ongoing research projects and engage with the audience.

IC Research Day : Info & Program

Guest speakers - KEYNOTE:

Flash Boys 2.0: Frontrunning, Transaction Reordering, and Consensus Instability in Decentralized Exchanges
Ari Juels, Professor - Cornell Tech (Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute), New York City & Co-Director of IC3

Adventures in Electronic Voting Research
Dan Wallach, Professor - Rice University in Houston, Texas.

When foes are friends: adversarial examples as protective technologies
Carmela Troncoso, Assistant Professor - École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland

Security Testing Hard to Reach Code
Mathias Payer, Assistant Professor - École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland

Date: jeudi, 6 juin, 2019 
Lieu: SwissTech Convention Center 
Inscrivez-vous : Registration (Closes June 4)


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How to become a unicorn in space



Are you a start-up incorporated in Switzerland, less than 5 years old and with a potential “space connection”? Then you should learn more about ESA Business Incubation Center (BIC) Switzerland!
 
ESA BIC CH currently boasts a portfolio of 21 start-ups and 3 alumni with fascinating innovations and technologies.
Attend this Info Event to learn more about our program and how to become an ESA BIC CH supported start-up yourself.

 The agenda will be as follows:

  • Welcome & Introduction to ESA BIC Switzerland (Nanja Strecker, ESA BIC Switzerland)
  • Presentation by Kompact (ESA BIC CH supported start-up)
  • Opportunities in New Space (José Achache, AP Swiss)
  • Keynote Speech by Astrocast “How to become a unicorn in space” (AP Swiss supported start-up)
  • Q&A
  • Lunch & Networking
The target audience for this event are interested start-ups, entrepreneurs and students from all over Switzerland.
We kindly ask you to register for this event via event@esabic.ch by June 3rd.
 
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Conférence « L’évolution de la Lune en Astrophysique et en exploration spatiale »

Georges Meylan, Professeur émérite d’Astrophysique et de cosmologie

A l’occasion du 50ème anniversaire de l'alunissage, la Bibliothèque de l’EPFL organise, en collaboration avec l’association Space@yourService, une série de 4 conférence pour inaugurer l’exposition « We choose to go to the Moon ». Présentée au Rolex Learning Center du 1er juin au 20 août 2019, l'exposition rend hommage aux milliers d’hommes et de femmes, mathématicien-e-s, ingénieur-e-s, physicien-e-s, technicien-e-s qui ont contribué à rendre le rêve de la conquête lunaire réalité. Les conférences auront lieu chaque jour du 3 au 6 juin, dès 12h, au Rolex Learning Center (zone à proximité de la cafétéria Le Klee by Takinoa). 

Programme des conférences

  • 3 Juin 2019
    « Les missions Apollo et le retour sur la Lune »
    Par Chloé Carrière, présidente de l’association Space@yourService
     
  • 4 Juin 2019
    « Les 50 ans de l’Homme sur la Lune »
    Par Claude Nicollier, astronaute et Professeur honoraire
    Inscriptions
     
  • 5 Juin 2019
    « Trous noirs et premières images »
    Par Pascale Jablonka, Professeure au Laboratoire d’astrophysique
     
  • 6 Juin 2019
    « Demandez la Lune ! Évolution de la perception humaine de la Lune »
    Par Georges Meylan, Professeur honoraire d’astrophysique et de cosmologie

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EE Distinguished Lecturer Seminar: Topological Signal Processing

Prof. Sergio Barbarossa, Sapienza University, Rome

Abstract: The goal of this talk is to present the basic tools for the representation and processing of signals defined over a topological space, i.e. a collection of points only characterized by a set of neighborhood relations. Motivating applications are all signals defined over a non-metric space, like gene regulatory networks, brain networks, social networks, etc. The recent field of graph signal processing (GSP) is a particular case of topological signal processing (TSP), referring to the situation where only pairwise relations among data are taken into account and then focusing only on signals defined over the vertices of a graph. Generalizing GSP, our goal is to incorporate multiway relations of various order by representing signals over simplicial complexes, to exploit their rich algebraic structure. After recalling the basic principles of algebraic topology, we introduce methods to build dictionaries capturing the metric-free structure of the signal domain and leading to informative representations of signals defined over sets of increasing order, e.g., vertices, edges, etc. The identification of these dictionaries forms the basis of a spectral simplicial complex theory, from which we establish an uncertainty principle and present its relation with sampling theory. After having introduced the analysis tools, we consider the synthesis problem, suggesting methods to infer the structure of the simplicial complex from data. We conclude the talk presenting some interesting applications to real data and highlight possible future developments.

Bio: Sergio Barbarossa is a Full Professor at Sapienza University of Rome. He has held several visiting positions at the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (’88), Univ. of Virginia (’95, ‘97), Univ. of Minnesota (’99). He received the 2010 Technical Achievements Award from the European Association for Signal Processing (EURASIP) society for his contributions on radar, communication and networks and won the IEEE Best Paper Awards from the IEEE Signal Processing Society for the years 2000 and 2014. He is an IEEE Fellow, a EURASIP Fellow and served as an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer. He has been the scientific coordinator of several European projects on wireless sensor networks, small cell networks, and distributed mobile cloud computing. He is currently managing the H2020 EU/Japan project 5G-MiEdge, merging millimeter wave and edge cloud technologies for 5G networks. He is involved in the H2020 project 5G-Conni, for the development of 5G private networks for Industry 4.0. His research interests include signal processing algorithms over topological spaces, topological methods for machine learning, 5G networks and mobile edge computing.
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Science-fiction et jeux vidéo pour décrypter la révolution digitale

Stéphane Intissar, CEO, Ozwe Sàrl, Lausanne , Camille Attard et Marion Bareil, Co-fondatrices, Tourmaline Studio, Genèv , Selim Krichane, Collaborateur scientifique, EPFL/Collège des humanités, Lausanne , Yannick Rochat, Premier assistant, UNIL/Sciences du langage et de l'information, Lausanne, Marc Atallah, Directeur et curateur, Maison d'Ailleurs, Yverdon-les-Bains.

Les nouvelles technologies, et plus récemment encore la digitalisation, ont de tout temps généré des inquiétudes et soulevé de grands débats. On sourit aujourd'hui des angoisses de nos ancêtres lorsque le téléphone est entré dans leurs foyers, mais qu’en est-il de nos propres appréhensions vis-à-vis des nouvelles technologies? Les médias sociaux ne vont-ils pas dégrader les relations humaines? L’intelligence artificielle va-t-elle prendre des décisions à notre place ou nous enfermer dans une vie passive? Quelle société est-on en train de bâtir et que faisons-nous de ces avancées technologiques qui engendrent une révolution unique dans l’histoire de l’humanité?

C’est à travers la science-fiction et la conception des jeux vidéo, précurseurs du monde de demain et reflet déformé de notre créativité et de notre humanisme, que nous vous proposons un voyage extraordinaire. Avec les plus grands spécialistes, créateurs, chercheurs et hommes de lettres, venez explorer l'impact de l'avancée des nouvelles technologies sur nous, êtres humains, connectés ou déconnectés!


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EPFL Network Science: Foundations & Applications

Ginestra Biancon, Ed Bullmore, Rowland Kao, Daniel Margulies, Eugenio Valdano, Pierre Vandergheynst, Kathryn Hess 

Network science has become a key discipline to model complex systems and study their emergent properties. While being rooted in applied mathematics, statistical physics, signal processing, and statistics, network science spinned off as a unique synergistic discipline. In addition, the availability of more quantitative data in many applications (in particular, neurosciences and biology) have led to unprecedented opportunities to formulate and answer new scientific questions. In this workshop, we will unite the top scientists in the field who will highlight the different perspectives brought by network science, highlighting both its foundations and most challenging applications


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Engineering Workshop - Network Science

https://network-science.epfl.ch/test-01/

Network science has become a key discipline to model complex systems and study their emergent properties. While being rooted in applied mathematics, statistical physics, signal processing, and statistics, network science spinned off as a unique synergistic discipline. In addition, the availability of more quantitative data in many applications (in particular, neurosciences and biology) have led to a unprecedented opportunities to formulate and answer new scientific questions. In this workshop, we will unite the top scientists in the field who will highlight the different perspectives brought by network science, highlighting both its foundations and most challenging applications


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C4DT Workshop on the difficulties of deploying E-Voting

Christophe Vigouroux from l'État de Genève and Thomas Hofer formerly from l'État de Genève
Denis Morel and Olivier Esseiva from Swiss Post
Wouter Lueks and Philip Jovanovic from EPFL

The C4DT Workshop on the difficulties of deploying E-Voting will take place on Friday June 7th from 10 :00 to 12 :00 in conference room BC 420.

Professors Carmela Troncoso, Bryan Ford and Edouard Bugnion will be welcoming Mr. Denis Morel and Mr. Olivier Esseiva from Swiss Post, Mr. Christophe Vigouroux from l’État de Genève, and Mr. Thomas Hofer formerly from l’État de Genève.
 
Implementing and deploying highly secure cryptographic protocols is difficult.
This informal and educational workshop will address the issues uncovered during the public intrusion test of the Swiss Post/Scytl e-voting solution. We will explain, for a non-technical audience, what were the problems found and why do they matter. We will also draw lessons on how make cryptographic implementations more secure and auditable.
 
The workshop will have three short presentations:
 
- Wouter Lueks and Philip Jovanovic from EPFL on the issues discovered and why they matter
- Denis Morel and Olivier Esseiva from Swiss Post explaining their approach and their next steps
- Thomas Hofer and Christophe Vigouroux on CHVote release of code and design philosophy.

Each talk will be followed by an open discussion and questions.
 


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[ Participate in the definition of the CHIST-ERA 2019 Call topics - Tallinn, June 11-13 ]



The CHIST-ERA ERA-NET is a consortium of research funding organisations supporting joint transnational research on multidisciplinary long-term Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and ICT-based challenges with the potential to lead to significant breakthroughs. The consortium is supported by the EU’s FET programme.
 
On a yearly basis, the participating funding organisations (incl. SNSF) support high risk, high impact projects by launching a transnational call for research proposals.
 
The 2019 Call, which will open in October, will address research challenges within two new and hot topics:

  • Explainable Machine Learning-based Artificial Intelligence
  • Novel Computational Approaches for Environmental Sustainability
 
Preliminary topic descriptions are available at this link.
 
The specific research challenges within these topics will be identified by the attendees of the CHIST-ERA Conference 2019, Tallinn, June 11-13, which is open to the research community.
 
The conference represents a unique opportunity to participate in scoping the call topics, to network with potential project partners and get insight into the future call. Attendance at the conference is not a prerequisite for submitting an application to this call. It can nevertheless provide background information for preparing a proposal.
 
For information about the conference, follow this link.
Registrations are open until June 8 at this link.
Link to the flyer.
 
For information about the next call, follow the ReO’s News channel and monitor the CHIST-ERA and the SNSF webpages.
Eligibility of the consortium: 3-6 partners from at least 3 different participating countries.
Eligibility of Swiss-based applicants: follow SNSF Project Funding eligibility criteria. Contact the SNSF prior to the submission: georges.klein@snsf.ch
Funding for Swiss-based applicants: depends on the amount allocated by the SNSF (last call: CHF 1M for 3-5 projects).
Duration: 24 or 36 months.
Timeline of the call (forecast):
  • Deadline for pre-proposals: January 2020.
  • Deadline for full proposals (by invitation): March 2020.
  • Decision: October 2020.
  • Earliest start of the project: December 2020.

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Hands-on Intel® Software Developer Workshop for Technical Computing and Artificial Intelligence



A unique technical workshop for software developers, engineers and advanced data scientists to learn how to use the Intel® Software Development Tools to create, tune and optimize C/C++, Python and Fortran code for maximum performance on the latest Intel® Processors and Technologies.

This event will take place at the EPFL.

AGENDA
08:30 – 09:30   Registration & Light breakfast
09:30 -10:00     Getting Deeper into the Intel® Software Development Tools
10:15 – 11:15    Code Tuning and Optimization using the Intel® Perfomance Tools
11:15 – 11:30    Coffee Break
11:30 – 13:00    Performance optimization using Intel® Advisor and the Roofline Model
13:00 – 14:00    Lunch break
14:00 – 15:30    Faster Machine Learning and Deep Learning with optimized Frameworks
15:30 – 15:45    Coffee Break
15:45 – 17:30    Deep Learning Inference on Intel® based Platforms
17:30 – 19:30    Networking with drinks and finger-food

Here is the page with the details and the registration.
 


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Mission SEDNA - FR Only

Alban Michon

Une aventure qui permet d'envisager le futur. Affronter les conditions les plus extrêmes de la planète pour se rapprocher des conditions de la planète Mars. Un camp de base avec une équipe d'une vingtaine de personne en surface, un habitat sous-marin fixé sous la banquise arctique remplit de nouvelles technologies et de prototypes. Un explorateur qui va tester, essayer, des objets ou des protocoles, outils ou programmes scientifiques qui permettront de faire avancer d'une manière conséquente la préparation des missions spatiales et le monde de demain en règle générale.
Une mission difficile,  passionnante et ambitieuse que nous aimerions mettre en place à partir de fin 2022.
A suivre ...

Des années 2000 à 2015, Alban est moniteur de plongée. Il gère l'école de plongée sous glace de Tignes et une école de plongée souterraine dans le Lot.
En 2010, Alban Michon intègre l'équipe de l'expédition DeepSea Under the pole. C'est une expédition de 45 jours, composée de 8 personnes, qui se déroule au pôle Nord. Elle est parrainée par l'explorateur français Jean-Louis Étienne, et sponsorisée par la marque Rolex. L'objectif de l'expédition est double: rapporter un témoignage audiovisuel de l'impact du changement climatique sur les régions polaires, et mener une expédition scientifique de suivi de la fonte de la banquise. 51 plongées sous la banquise sont effectuées durant l'expédition par 5 plongeurs spécialisés en plongée sous glace, dont Alban Michon. L'expédition sera interrompue avant son terme en raison de la débâcle qui met en danger la vie de l'équipe. Elle est retracée dans le livre et le film On a marché sous le pôle
En 2012, Alban Michon organise l'expédition connue sous le nom WI.D.E Project sur la côte est du Groenland. Elle s'étend sur 1000 km, parcourus en kayak de mer. Il effectue cette expédition en binôme avec le caméraman Vincent Berthet, qui avait déjà participé à DeepSea Under the pole. L'expédition dure 51 jours ; 16 plongées sous les icebergs sont effectuées. Le livre et le film Le piège blanc retracent l'expédition.
 
En 2016 / 2017, Alban participe au tournage du film L'Homme qui voulait plonger sur Mars diffusé sur France 5. Ce documentaire relève les nouveaux challenges de la conquêtes spatiale et de la Mission Mars. En suivant Alban en tant qu'explorateur et son rêve, le téléspectateur est embarqué dans un voyage scientifique.
En 2018, Alban réalise l'expédition Arktic en hiver sur le célèbre et mythique passage du Nord Ouest. Une aventure extrême en solitaire sur la banquise qui a duré 62 jours et avoisinant des températures de - 55°C. Le livre L'itinéraire d'un nomade des glaces nous fait revivre cette dernière aventure.
 


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17th EPFL - CHUV Research Day on Translational Musculoskeletal Biomechanics



For the 17th consecutive year, the LBO (EPFL), the LMAM (EPFL), the Department of Musculoskeletal Medicine (CHUV), and the Regenerative Therapy Unit (CHUV) are organizing a day of translational research in musculoskeletal biomechanics. This day aims to encourage synergies between the Service of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology at CHUV and the basic sciences at EPFL. In addition to presentations of collaborative projects between these two institutions. The event will take place Friday, June 14, 2019, from 9:00 to 16:00, at EPFL (room BC 01). This event is open to anyone interested.


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EE Distinguished Lecturer Seminar: Inverse problems in medical imaging – view the invisible

Prof. Thiran is author or co-author of 1 book, 9 book chapters, more than 200 journal papers and more than 250 peer-reviewed papers published in the proceedings of international conferences. He holds 9 international patents. Among other duties, he has been Co-Editor- in-Chief of the Signal Processing journal, an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, the general chairman of the 2008 European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO 2008) and the Technical Co-chair of the 2015 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (IEEE ICIP 2015 - Quebec City, Canada). He is a senior member of the IEEE.

Abstract: Over the last decade, thanks to the development of both mathematical methods and computational power, medical imaging has been evolving rapidly from classical image visualization and post-processing to the extraction of more subtle quantitative information about the organ/tissue at hand. This domain is now known as computational medical imaging. In this context, I will present how the resolution of a regularized linear inverse problem can reveal unprecedented information in medical imaging. I will first consider the relatively recent modality of diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MR), and show how we can extract unique information from the raw data by properly modeling the forward problem and carefully inverting it. Our work allows extracting information about the brain tissue architecture that is several orders of magnitude smaller than the MR imaging resolution, leading to so-called brain microstructure analysis. I will also show how different MR contrasts can be used jointly to reconstruct an even more complete picture of the tissue microstructure, paving the way towards what I call MR microscopy. I will also show how the same concepts apply to other medical imaging problems, namely ultrasound image reconstruction and radiotherapy planning, and I will finish by discussing how machine learning can contribute to this field.
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25th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations – ICNF 2019



The International Conference on Fluctuation Phenomena started in 1968 and moved all over the world.  For the first time the conference will take place in Switzerland: the 25th edition (ICNF 2019) will be held at EPFL Microcity in Neuchâtel, from June 18 to June 21, 2019.

The International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations (ICNF) is a biennial event that brings together researchers interested in theoretical and experimental aspects of fluctuations across a wide spectrum of scientific and technological fields.


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High-Resolution Brain Machine Interfaces using Flexible Silicon Electronics

Prof Jonathan Viventi, Duke University, Durham, USA.

Right now, all of the tools that interface with our brains face a fundamental trade-off. We can either sample with low resolution, over large areas of the brain, or we can sample with fine resolution, over very small areas of the brain. This doesn’t fit with the way our brains are structured. With over 12 million neurons in each square cm of brain surface, we need to sample with high resolution over large areas in order to understand the way the brain works. The limitation is wiring. Every contact we put in the brain requires an individual wire and we can’t fit more than about 100 wires inside our heads. Using the same electronics that enable a digital camera to have millions of pixels without millions of wires, we can move some of the signal processing right to the sensors, allowing us to overcome the wiring bottleneck. The challenge is that traditional electronics are rigid and brittle. They are not compatible with the soft, curved surfaces of the brain. The solution is to make electronics that are flexible. Think of a piece of 2x4 lumber and a sheet of paper, they’re both made out of the same material, but have dramatically different physical properties. Leveraging that idea, we can make electronics that are extremely flexible, by making them very thin. Using these flexible electronics, I have developed high-density electrode arrays with thousands of electrodes that do not require thousands of external wires.
This technology has enabled extremely flexible arrays of 1,024 electrodes and soon, thousands of multiplexed and amplified sensors spaced as closely as 25 µm apart, which are connected using just a few wires.  These devices yield an unprecedented level of spatial and temporal micro-electrocorticographic (µECoG) resolution for recording and stimulating distributed neural networks.  I will present the development of this technology and data from in vivo recordings.  I will also discuss how we are translating this technology for both research and human clinical use. 

Bio
Jonathan Viventi is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University. Dr. Viventi earned his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.Eng. and B.S.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University. Dr. Viventi's research applies innovations in flexible electronics, low power analog circuits, and machine learning to create new technology for interfacing with the brain at a much finer scale and with broader coverage than previously possible. He creates new tools for neuroscience research and technology to diagnose and treat neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Using these tools, he collaborates with neuroscientists and clinicians to explore the fundamental properties of brain networks in both health and disease. His research program works closely with industry, including filing six patents and several licensing agreements. His work has been featured as cover articles in Science Translational Medicine and Nature Materials, and has also appeared in Nature Neuroscience, the Journal of Neurophysiology, and Brain. For these achievements, Dr. Viventi was selected to the 2014 MIT Technology Review “Top 35 Innovators Under 35” list, the 2014 Popular Science “Brilliant 10” list and an NSF CAREER Award.
 


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NMC 2019 - STI Workshop on Nanomechanical Sensors

Michael L. Roukes (Caltech), Andrew Cleland (U. Chicago), Scott Manalis (MIT), John E. Sader (U. Melbourne), Beth Pruitt (UCSB), Javier Tamayo (CSIC), Adrian Bachtold (ICFO), Chris Degen (ETHZ), Johannes Fink (IST Austria), Silvan Schmid (TUW), Junchul Lee (KAIST), Cindy Regal (JILA), Anja Boisen (DTU), Paola Cappellaro (MIT), Rachel McKendry (UCL), Eva Weig (U. Konstanz), Armin Knoll (IBM), Matt Matheny (Caltech), Annalisa De Pastina (EPFL), ...

Nanomechanics was born around 35 years ago with the invention of the STM and AFM. It was in the mid-90s when the first nanoelectromechanical devices were fabricated. Since then, nanomechanical systems have been slowly gaining track in the research community and now have become very important in many different applications. The nanomechanical sensors workshop exists since 2003 and has been organized every year gathering the most prominent figures in the nanomechanical sensing community. In the 2019 edition we want to focus our workshop in two of the most promising fields: quantum and bio-sensing. We are putting together an exciting program with 8 keynote speakers and more than 10 invited speakers of the top international tier. We expect to attract around 150-200 people from all over the world. Very importantly, in our even we will put in contact two apparently very separate communities as are quantum and bio-sensing communities. The main objective during the workshop will be to explore the synergies between them. The School of Engineering of EPFL supports the organization of scientific workshops on the EPFL campus on topics of heightened interest at the forefront of research. These workshops attract highly visible and internationally recognizable speakers.
 


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NFYB-1 regulates mitochondrial function and longevity via lysosomal prosaposin

Rebecca George Tharyan Dept. Dr. Adam Antebi, Molecular Genetics of Ageing, Max-Planck-Institut for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, Germany

Mitochondrial activity is critical for cellular vitality and organismal longevity, yet underlying regulatory mechanisms in metazoans remain elusive. To identify mitochondrial regulators, we performed an RNAi screen leveraging the remarkable mitochondrial changes in C. elegans upon recovery from adult reproductive diapause. We discovered NFYB-1, a subunit of the NF-Y transcriptional complex, as a crucial regulator of mitochondrial function. Loss of NFYB-1 leads to reduced mitochondrial gene expression, mitochondrial fragmentation, and abolition of longevity triggered by mitochondrial impairment. Moreover, NFYB-1 deletion disrupts mitochondrial UPRmt factors and mitochondrial-to-cytosolic stress response (MCSR). Multi-omics analysis indicates that NFYB-1 serves as a potent repressor of several ER genes and the ER stress response, as well as lysosomal prosaposin. Downstream of NFYB-1, limiting prosaposin expression alters ceramide and cardiolipin pools, restores mitochondrial fusion, gene expression and longevity. Thus, the NFYB-1/PSAP axis coordinates lysosomal to mitochondrial communication to prolong life.
 


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[ Registrations open for the Swiss-Iranian Research Workshop, 20 June 2019 ]



In May 2018, a Swiss delegation (representatives of SBFI, SNSF, universities and research institutions) visited Iran to intensify research cooperation between the two countries.

This year, an Iranian delegation is visiting Switzerland. As part of this visit, ZHAW, SERI’s leading house for bilateral research collaboration with South Asia and Iran, is organising a workshop in Winterthur on Thursday, 20 June 2019 (from 10.00-17.00), where researchers from Iran and Switzerland are to meet in order to get to know each other, exchange views on technical topics and develop joint research projects.

The workshop is open to researchers with permanent employment in Switzerland at any university, university of applied sciences, university of teachers education or any officially recognized research institute, and active in one of the following focus areas:

  • Mental Health
  • Non-communicable diseases
  • Environmental Technologies
 
Please note: the number of registrations from Swiss researchers is limited to 10. We therefore recommend you to register as soon as possible by following the applicable link below:  
Participation is free of cost.
 
Contact:
Leading House South Asia and Iran
ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences, CH-8401 Winterthur, Switzerland
leadinghouse@zhaw.ch
 
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TRABIT Summer School 2019



In the context of the European ITN Translational Brain Imaging Network (TRABIT) we organise a Computational Magnetic Resonance Brain Imaging Summer School at EPFL.

Our aim is to train young researchers in both a deep understanding of computational neuroimaging methods together with the clinical needs and constraints arising in the treatment of brain disorders.  

Who can apply?
The school is open for PhD students in Switzerland. Selection of the students will be made on the basis of a CV and motivation letter. There are 15 open participation slots.

Venue
The school will take place on the EPFL campus in Lausanne. For more details visit the Program and Venue sections.

For more information: http://trabit2019.epfl.ch
 


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The 12th International Symposium on Linear Drives for Industry Applications - LDIA2019



The 12th International Symposium on Linear Drives for Industry Applications (LDIA) will be held from July 1-3, 2019 in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. The goal of the symposium is to bring together researchers from both academia and industry, and to share research findings and discuss future developments in linear drive technology.

Important dates:
Early bird registration before May 1st 2019

Website:
ldia2019.epfl.ch
 


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CMOS Microelectronics for DNA detection using Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors

Prof. Dr. Pantelis Georgiou
Imperial College London

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/983964754

Abstract: In the last decade, we have seen a convergence of microelectronics into the world of healthcare providing novel solutions for early detection, diagnosis and therapy of disease. This has been made possible due to the emergence of CMOS technology, allowing fabrication of advanced systems with complete integration of sensors, instrumentation and processing, enabling design of miniaturised medical devices which operate with low-power. This has been specifically beneficial for the application areas of DNA based diagnostics and full genome sequencing, where the implementation of chemical sensors known as Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) directly in CMOS has enabled the design of large-scale arrays of millions of sensors that can conduct in-parallel detection of DNA. Furthermore, the scaling of CMOS with Moore’s law and the integration capability with microfluidics has enabled commercial efforts to make full genome sequencing affordable and therefore deployable in hospitals and research labs.
 
In this talk, I present how my lab is advancing the areas of DNA detection and rapid diagnostics through the design of CMOS based Lab-on-Chip systems using ISFETs. I will first introduce the fundamentals and physical properties of DNA as a target molecule and how it can be detected using different modalities through the use of CMOS technology. I will then present methods of design of ISFET sensors and instrumentation in CMOS, in addition to the challenges and limitations that exist for fabrication, providing solutions to allow design of large-scale ISFET arrays for real-time DNA amplification and detection systems. I will conclude with the presentation of state-of-the-art CMOS systems that are currently being used for genomics and point-of-care diagnostics, and the results of our latest fabricated multi-sensor CMOS platform for rapid screening of infectious disease and management of antimicrobial resistance.

Bio: Pantelis Georgiou currently holds the position of Reader (Associate Professor) at Imperial College London within the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is the head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory in the Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology; a multi-disciplinary group that invents, develops and demonstrates advanced micro-devices to meet global challenges in biomedical science and healthcare. His research includes ultra-low power micro-electronics, bio-inspired circuits and systems, lab-on-chip technology and application of micro-electronic technology to create novel medical devices. Application areas of his research include new technologies for treatment of diabetes such as the artificial pancreas, novel Lab-on-Chip technology for genomics and diagnostics targeted towards infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and wearable technologies for rehabilitation of chronic conditions.
 
Dr. Georgiou graduated with a 1st Class Honours MEng Degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2004 and Ph.D. degree in 2008 both from Imperial College London. He then joined the Institute of Biomedical Engineering as Research Associate until 2010, when he was appointed Head of the Bio-inspired Metabolic Technology Laboratory. In 2011, he joined the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, where he currently holds an academic faculty position. He conducted pioneering work on the silicon beta cell and is now leading the project forward to the development of the first bio-inspired artificial pancreas for treatment of Type I diabetes. In addition to this, he made significant contributions to the development of integrated chemical-sensing systems in CMOS. He has pioneered the development of the Ion-Sensitive Field Effect Transistor, an integrated pH sensor which is currently being used in next generation DNA sequencing machines, demonstrating for the first time its use in low-power weak-inversion, and its capability in a multimodal sensing array for Lab-on-Chip applications. Dr. Georgiou is a senior member of the IEEE and IET and serves on the BioCAS and Sensory Systems technical committees of the IEEE CAS Society. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors and TBioCAS journals. He is also the CAS representative on the IEEE sensors council. In 2013 he was awarded the IET Mike Sergeant Achievement Medal for his outstanding contributions to engineering and development of the bio-inspired artificial pancreas. In 2017, he was also awarded the IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement award. He is an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer in Circuits and Systems.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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"Modelling Breast Cancer Using Patient-Derived Tumour Xenografts"

Prof. Carlos CALDAS CRUK Cambridge Institute Breast Cancer Programme Cambridge Cancer Centre University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Weston Visiting Professor, Weizmann Institute of Science

A Lola and John Grace Distinguished Lectures in Cancer Research
This seminar will also be televised to CHUV Visioconférence 2, to Biopôle 3 Room 00CB11 and Geneva University A04.2713


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PRIME 2019: 15th Conference on PhD Research in Microelectronics and Electronics



PRIME has been established over the recent years as an important conference where PhD students and post-docs with less than one year post-PhD experience can present their research results and network with experts from industry, academia and research. PRIME 2019 will feature conference program reflecting the wide spectrum of research topics in Microelectronics and Electronics, building bridges between various research fields. In addition to the technical sessions, opportunities for the conference attendees will be the keynote talks, workshops and social events.

PRIME 2019 is Technically Co-sponsored by IEEE and IEEE CAS. and will be co-located with the International Conference on Synthesis, Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Methods and Applications to Circuit Design (SMACD 2019) https://www.smacd2019.com The conference proceedings will be submitted for inclusion in IEEE Xplore.


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[ First joint EUREKA / Photonics21 Mirror Group Call for R&D&I project proposals addressing Photonics for advanced manufacturing | Research funding ]



Participating countries:
  • Austria
  • France
  • Germany
  • Israel
  • Poland
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
 
The participating funding bodies from the above mentioned countries intend to fund joint research and development in the area of photonics. Applicants are expected to undertake research aiming at market-able products, services or technologies with high market potential in the participating countries and/or Europe. This call will be administered under the regulations of the intergovernmental EUREKA network.
  • Call launch: March 25th, 2019
  • Submission deadline for EUREKA and Innosuisse pre-proposal applications: July 25th, 2019
  • Evaluation of the applications: August - November 2019
  • Communication of the results: December 2019
  • Start of projects: Between January and June 2020
  • Call document

Submission procedure
  • The consortium partners jointly have to complete the EUREKA Project Application Form: http://www.eurekanetwork.org/eureka-project-application-form.
  • Early consultation with the respective national funding bodies and with the respective national EUREKA offices is strongly advised. Please note that in some countries a registration of the participants prior to the proposal submission and/or the completion of additional national forms is mandatory.
  • The completed EUREKA Project Application Form should be submitted electronically by the main participant / co-ordinator (on behalf of the consortium) before the submission deadline (25 July 2019) to projects@eurekanetwork.org with reference to “EUREKA photonics call 2019” in the subject line.
  • Participants are obliged to ensure that they provide all mandatory forms and information in time and that their project proposal complies with the applicable national eligibility criteria.
 
Switzerland:
Swiss project partners should adhere to the Innosuisse funding rules, combining an industrial and academic partner on the Swiss side of the project. Please take into consideration that the proposal should be balanced in a way that the Swiss industrial partner has to carry at least the same amount of costs as the academic partner (University, RTO, University of Applied Science, etc.). The academic partner is 100% funded and receives a further 10% of the Innosuisse funding in cash from the industrial partner. The industrial partner receives in return on investment the right to exploit the project results in its business domain. A participation based on self-funding is also possible if the ability to finance the project costs in-kind can be demonstrated.
Participants are invited to contact their national project coordinators before submitting the documents in order to check the eligibility of the project idea and consortium and consult on possible alternative funding models if necessary. In addition to the centrally submitted EUREKA Project Application Form, Swiss partners need to submit a shortened Innosuisse project application form available on the call website.
 
Contacts

For Photonics 21 (partner search, advice on national funding rules and writing proposals)
Swissphotonics: Christoph Harder
harder@swissphotonics.net
+41 79 219 9051
https://www.swissphotonics.net/home

For Innosuisse (eligibility, funding synchronization)
Innosuisse: Claire Dové
claire.dove@innosuisse.ch
+41 58 466 79 51
https://www.innosuisse.ch/eureka
 
Contact: research@epfl.ch for administrative, financial, ethics and legal assistance.
Accessibility: General public
Admittance: Free
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GaN for the Future

Prof. Dr. Debbie Senesky
Stanford University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/165147980

Abstract: There has been a tremendous amount of research and industrial investment in gallium nitride (GaN) as it is positioned to replace silicon in the billion-dollar (USD) power electronics industry, as well as the post-Moore microelectronics universe. In addition, the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for pioneering research in GaN that led to the realization of the energy-efficient blue light-emitting diode (LED). Furthermore, GaN electronics have operated at temperatures as high as 1000°C making it a viable platform for robust space-grade electronics and nano-satellites.  Even with these major technological breakthroughs, we have just begun the “GaN revolution.” New communities are adopting this platform for a multitude of emerging device applications including the following: sensing, energy harvesting, actuation, communication, and photonics.  In this talk, we will review and discuss the benefits of GaN’s two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) over silicon’s p-n junction for these new and emerging applications.  In addition, we will discuss opportunities for transformational development of this semiconductor device platform (e.g., interface engineering, thermal metrology, selective-area doping) to realize future GaN-based electronic systems.
 
Bio: Debbie G. Senesky is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and by courtesy, the Electrical Engineering Department. In addition, she is the Principal Investigator of the EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory (XLab).  Her research interests include the development of micro- and nano-scale sensors, high-temperature wide bandgap (GaN, SiC) electronics, and robust interface materials for operation within extreme harsh environments.   She received the B.S. degree (2001) in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California. She received the M.S. degree (2004) and Ph.D. degree (2007) in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition, she has held positions at GE Sensing (formerly known as NovaSensor), GE Global Research Center, and Hewlett Packard.  She has served on the program committee of the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (Transducers), and International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S).  She is currently co-editor for IEEE Electron Device Letters, Sensors (journal), and Micromachines (journal).   In recognition of her work, she is a recipient of the Emerging Leader Abie Award from AnitaB.org, NASA Early Faculty Career Award, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Ph.D. Fellowship Award. More information about Prof. Senesky can be found at xlab.stanford.edu or on Instagram/Twitter: @debbiesenesky.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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EPFL 50th Anniversary - Research Days - EPFL Valais Wallis, Sion

Programme en cours / Programme coming soon.

The Research Days will bring together key political figures from the area, local industrial partners and academic partners of the EPFL campuses (Sion, Neuchâtel, Geneva, Fribourg, Lausanne). Covering the key themes of each site, the event’s objective is to show how research contributes or can contribute to society, both with political support and through collaboration with industry.

The theme of the event in EPFL Valais Wallis in Sion is Energy.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Microcity, Neuchâtel

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.

La thématique de l'événement à Microcity Neuchâtel est la Microtechnique.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Campus Biotech, Genève

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
La thématique de l'événement au Campus Biotech est la Recherche en neuro et sur le cerveau.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - BlueFactory Fribourg

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
La thématique de l'événement au BlueFactory à Fribourg est l'Eco-bâtiment et écologie.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Campus Lausanne

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
L'événement sur le Campus lausannois de l'EPFL se déclinera autour des projets phares et aura lieu durant les Portes ouvertes de l'EPFL (14 et 15 septembre 2019, https://www.epfl.ch/campus/events/fr/celebration/portes-ouvertes/).
 


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title to be announced

Prof. Richard E. Lenski, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Education:
1973-76    B.A., Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (USA)
1977-82    Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Positions:
1982-85    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA)
1984        Visiting Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (USA)
1985-88    Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1988-91    Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1991-        Hannah Professor of Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)


Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/715846975
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Engineering PhD Summit on Intelligent Systems

Detailed program to be announced


The School of Engineering of EPFL is pleased to announce the 2nd annual PhD Summit, a workshop for final year PhD students interested in a career in academia. We invite to campus, on a competitive basis, a group of exceptional graduating PhD students from institutions worldwide.
Selected candidates will be invited to the EPFL campus in Switzerland to present their research and get informal feedback from top faculty of the School of Engineering. Each accepted student will be given the opportunity to visit EPFL laboratories related to the summit theme and have intensive exchange with the lab heads and the students.
The PhD Summit prize for the best presentation and research content will be awarded during the workshop.
Funds for travel and accommodation will be provided for the selected candidates.
The Engineering PhD Summit is organised by the School of Engineering, with the support of the School of Computer and Communication Sciences, the School of Life Sciences and the School of Basic Sciences.


ntelligent systems — software and/or hardware systems that can interact with their dynamic environments, process data, perform proper actions, and improve over time — are becoming ubiquitous. Advancements in information technology, artificial intelligence and control, computing capabilities, instrumentation, sensors and actuators have dramatically increased the pace at which intelligent systems enter our daily lives, e.g. in our software, smartphones, cars, robots, and infrastructure.
Intelligent systems involve exciting scientific and engineering questions: How can we push the technological limits to make intelligent systems more robust, more useful, more intuitive, better at improving and possibly repairing themselves? How can we approach the adaptive behavior exhibited in nature?
The Annual PhD Summit of the School of Engineering at EPFL will cover the theory, design, and applications of intelligent systems with an interdisciplinary perspective. Last year Ph.D. students working in fields such as robotics, embedded systems, internet of things, artificial intelligence, machine learning, computer games, human-computer interfaces, computational neuroscience, and cognitive science, with novel research contributions that fit into the general theme of Intelligent Systems are eligible to apply to the summit.

 
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Architects of Structural Biology: Bragg, Perutz, Kendrew and Hodgkin

Sir John Meurig Thomas The lecturer, a personal friend of Perutz, Kendrew, Klug, Hodgkin and Phillips, was formerly the Director of the Royal Institution of GB, former Head of the Department of Physical Chemistry and former Master of Peterhouse, University of Cambridge. He is a solid-state, surface and materials chemist and recipient of several awards, including the Willard-Gibbs, Pauling, Kapitza, Natta, Stokes, Davy and Faraday medals. A New mineral, meurigite, is named after him. He was awarded the Royal Medal for Physical Sciences by the Royal Society in 2016.

By John Meurig Thomas
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

When Max Perutz and John Kendrew, principal founders of structural molecular biology, set about, in the late 1940s, to solve the structures of haemoglobin and myoglobin, many scientists, notably developmental biologists and physiologists, ridiculed the name molecular biology and others accused them and their team, which later included Crick and Watson, of practicing biochemistry without license. Yet the revolution that they, Dorothy Hodgkin and their mentor Lawrence Bragg, initiated in the early 1950s led to a new era in modern medicine, and had a transformative influence on all aspects of biology.
In addition, the Laboratory of Molecular Biology (under the aegis of the U.K. Medical Research Council) that they established in 1962 in Cambridge, is arguably one of the most successful advanced research centres ever. Twenty three Nobel Laureates (11 of them from the USA) have worked there; and numerous medicines used world-wide for the treatment and cure of breast cancer, arthritis and life-threatening respiratory conditions have emerged from discoveries made there.
How was such a successful laboratory founded and managed? And how did the four protagonists – three chemists and a physicist – and other great contemporaries of theirs interact? This talk will address these questions and describe individual personalities, achievements, idiosyncrasies, and the roles of J. D. Bernal (friend of Picasso, Paul Robeson and Earl Mountbatten), Francis Crick, Aaron Klug and David Phillips, who solved the first structure of an enzyme at the Royal Institution (RI). It was at the RI, and later in Departments of Mineralogy and Textile Physics, that Bernal and Astbury first investigated the structures of “living molecules”. The rivalry between the Cambridge trio and the brilliant, charismatic, U.S. scientist Linus Pauling will also be discussed.
 


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Flexible Radios and Flexible Networks

Prof. Dr. Alyssa B. Apsel,
Cornell University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/637254875

Abstract: Over the past decades the world has become increasingly connected, with communications driving both markets and social movements.  Low power electronics, efficient communications, and better battery technology have all contributed to this revolution, but the cost and power required for these systems must be pushed further to make cheap, ubiquitous, seamless communication accessible to a wider community.   In this talk I will discuss two engineering approaches to this problem.  I will look at various approaches to drive the power down in radio networks that span across circuits and systems.  I will also look at creative biologically inspired approaches to enabling very low power networks and IoT.  Finally, I will discuss how by adding flexibility and building reconfigurable hardware, we can likewise build lower power and less costly consumer systems that can adapt across protocols and networks and work under changing device technologies.

Bio: Alyssa Apsel received the B.S. from Swarthmore College in 1995 and the Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, in 2002.  She joined Cornell University in 2002, where she is currently Director of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  She was a Visiting Professor at Imperial College, London from 2016-2018.  The focus of her research is on power-aware mixed signal circuits and design for highly scaled CMOS and modern electronic systems.  Her current research is on the leading edge of ultra-low power and flexible RF interfaces for IoT.  She has authored or coauthored over 100 refereed publications including one book in related fields of RF mixed signal circuit design, ultra-low power radio, interconnect design and planning, photonic integration, and process invariant circuit design techniques resulting in ten patents.  She received best paper awards at ASYNC 2006 and IEEE SiRF 2012, had a MICRO “Top Picks” paper in 2006, received a college teaching award in 2007, received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2004, and was selected by Technology Review Magazine as one of the Top Young Innovators in 2004.  She is a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE CAS for 2018-2019, and has also served on the Board of Governors of IEEE CAS (2014-2016) and as an Associate Editor of various journals including IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I and II, and Transactions on VLSI.  She has also served as the chair of the Analog and Signal Processing Technical committee of ISCAS 2011, is on the Senior Editorial Board of JETCAS, as Deputy Editor in Chief of Circuits and Systems Magazine, and as the co-founder and Chair of ISCAS Late Breaking News.  In 2016, Dr. Apsel co-founded AlphaWave IP Corporation, a multi-national Silicon IP provider focused on multi-standard analog Silicon IP solutions for the world of IOT.  As Chief Technology Officer of AlphaWave, Dr. Apsel led the company’s global research capability with offices in Silicon Valley, Toronto, and London. 

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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title to be announced

Prof. Hari Shroff, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Dr. Hari Shroff received a B.S.E. in bioengineering from the University of Washington in 2001, and under the supervision of Dr. Jan Liphardt, completed his Ph.D. in biophysics at the University of California at Berkeley in 2006 . He spent the next three years performing postdoctoral research under the mentorship of Eric Betzig at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus where his research focused on development of photactivated localization microscopy (PALM), an optical superresolution technique. Dr. Shroff is now chief of NIBIB's Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging laboratory, where he and his staff are developing new imaging tools for application in biological and clinical research.

Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/118303710
 
 
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Open Science Day



To celebrate the 50th anniversary of EPFL, its President Martin Vetterli invites you to explore what is Open Science with world-class researchers and influential policy makers. How can we successfully transition to digital scholarship? What will knowledge production and dissemination resemble in the future? This day will be dedicated to discussing the promises and challenges of open and reproducible science in various disciplines present at EPFL, from the life sciences to particle physics.
 
The event will take place in the main auditorium of the landmark Rolex Learning Center on EPFL Campus. It is free of charge and is open to everyone. However, registration is required.
 
MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION HERE
 
Open science is a complex and transversal topic that can only be understood when a variety of point of views collide. We are honored to confirm that the following people have accepted our invitation to share their expertise with the participants:
 
Sir Philip Campbell, Editor-in-Chief Springer Nature
Ingrid Daubechies, Duke University
Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General
Maria Leptin, EMBO Director
José Moura, IEEE President Elect
Fernando Perez, University of California Berkeley
Robert-Ian Smits, TU/e Executive Board President
Marcel Salathé, EPFL
Bruno Strasser, University of Geneva
Jeannette Wing, Columbia University

 


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The LIMNA symposium on Emerging Topics and Technologies in Metabolism

Confirmed speakers: Karine Clément, Sorbonne Université, Paris, France Jorge Ferrer, Cente for Genomic regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Spain Arvand Haschemi, Medical University of Vienna, Austria Zoltan Kutalik, University of Lausanne, Switzerland Susanne Mandrup, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Samuel Nobs, Weizmann Institute of Science, Reẖovot, Israel Ganna Panasyuk, Necker Enfants Malades Institute (INEM), Paris, France   Short talks will be selected from submitted abstracts.

 The registration to the LIMNA Symposium on October 29, 2019 at the Olympic Museum, Lausanne is now open! The LIMNA symposium on Emerging Topics and Technologies in Metabolism will gather speakers using “next-generation” approaches (systems genetics, omic, computation) to study metabolism-related processes and tissues.

Registration is now open!
Deadline for abstract submission: 01.09.2019
Deadline for registration only (registration is free but mandatory) : 01.10.2019 Participation will be likely recognized by the Federation of Swiss Cantonal Veterinary Officiers as a half day of ongoing training.
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Merging Humans and Machines with Hydrogel Technology

Prof. Dr. Xuanhe Zhao,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/385971995

Abstract: While human tissues and organs are mostly soft, wet and bioactive; machines are commonly hard, dry and biologically inert. Bridging human-machine interfaces is of imminent importance in addressing grand societal challenges in healthcare, security, sustainability, education and joy of living. However, interfacing human and machines is extremely challenging due to their fundamentally contradictory properties. At MIT SAMs Lab, we propose to harness “hydrogel technology” to form long-term, high-efficacy, compatible and seamless interfaces between humans and machines. On one side, hydrogels with similar mechanical and physiological properties as tissues and organs can naturally integrate with human body over the long term, greatly alleviating the foreign body response and mechanical mismatches. On the other side, the hydrogels with intrinsic or integrated electrodes, optical fibers, sensors, actuators and circuits can effectively bridge external machines and human bodies via electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical interactions. In this talk, I will first discuss the mechanisms to design extreme properties for hydrogels, including tough, resilient, adhesive, strong and antifatigue, for long-term robust human-machine interfaces.  Then I will discuss a set of novel hydrogel devices that interface with the human body, including i). hydrogel neural probes capable of electro-opto-fluidic interrogation of single neurons in mice over life time; ii). ingestible hydrogel pills capable of continuously monitoring core-body physiological conditions over a month;  and iii). untethered fast and forceful hydrogel robots controlled by magnetic fields for minimal invasive operations. I will conclude the talk by proposing a systematic approach to design next-generation human-machine interfaces based on hydrogel technology.

Bio: Xuanhe Zhao is an associate professor in mechanical engineering at MIT. His research group designs soft materials that possess unprecedented properties to address grant societal challenges. Dr. Zhao is the recipient of the early career award and young investigator award from National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Society of Engineering Science, American Vacuum Society, Adhesion Society, Materials Today, Journal of Applied Mechanics, and Extreme Mechanics Letters. He held the Hunt Faculty Scholar at Duke, and the d'Arbeloff Career Development Chair and Noyce Career Development Professor at MIT. He was selected as a highly cited researcher by Web of Science in 2018.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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Dr. Silvano De Franceschi - IMT Distinguished Lecture

Dr. Silvano De Franceschi
CEA-INAC


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/982557518

Abstract and Bio to follow.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program


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title to be announced

Prof. Jussi Taipale, Cambridge University (UK)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
To be provided.

Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/855402627
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