Upcoming Seminars and Events

Profiling Histone Modifications in Single Cells to Reveal the Dynamics and Control of Blood Cell Differentiation

Jake Yeung, Ph.D., van Oudenaarden group, Hubrecht Institute, Utrecht (NL)

BIOENGINEERING SEMINAR

Abstract:
Histone modifications form an adaptable epigenetic regulatory layer that package the genome inside the nucleus and mediate dynamic transcriptional programs. This packaging can be modulated by a wide spectrum of post-translational histone modifications, regulating the expression of associated genes. During cell differentiation, the distribution of these histone modifications changes to support the new expression state. These dynamics are ideally studied at the single-cell level, because it is challenging to isolate discrete intermediate states for bulk analysis. We therefore developed a high-throughput method that uses chromatin immunocleavage (ChIC) to profile histone modifications in more than 15000 individual cells (scChIC-seq).

In this talk, I will focus on the challenges of analyzing single-cell histone modification data to reconstruct differentiation dynamics from single-cell signal. In particular, I will present machine learning strategies that model sparse count data and project onto lower-dimensional manifolds in order to predict relationships between cells as well as relationships across genomic regions.

I will also discuss using systems biology methods to infer transcription factor (TF) activities and how to apply this to single cell data. This approach infers key TF binding motifs and predicts master regulators underlying transcriptional programs of hematopoiesis.

Finally, I will talk about integrating single-cell datasets of different histone modifications to elucidate coordination of epigenetic reprogramming during blood cell differentiation. Overall, scChIC-seq enables the dynamic reconstruction of the global chromatin landscape during in vivo differentiation.
 
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[ First joint EUREKA / Photonics21 Mirror Group Call for R&D&I project proposals addressing Photonics for advanced manufacturing | Research funding ]



Participating countries:
  • Austria
  • France
  • Germany
  • Israel
  • Poland
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
 
The participating funding bodies from the above mentioned countries intend to fund joint research and development in the area of photonics. Applicants are expected to undertake research aiming at market-able products, services or technologies with high market potential in the participating countries and/or Europe. This call will be administered under the regulations of the intergovernmental EUREKA network.
  • Call launch: March 25th, 2019
  • Submission deadline for EUREKA and Innosuisse pre-proposal applications: July 25th, 2019
  • Evaluation of the applications: August - November 2019
  • Communication of the results: December 2019
  • Start of projects: Between January and June 2020
  • Call document

Submission procedure
  • The consortium partners jointly have to complete the EUREKA Project Application Form: http://www.eurekanetwork.org/eureka-project-application-form.
  • Early consultation with the respective national funding bodies and with the respective national EUREKA offices is strongly advised. Please note that in some countries a registration of the participants prior to the proposal submission and/or the completion of additional national forms is mandatory.
  • The completed EUREKA Project Application Form should be submitted electronically by the main participant / co-ordinator (on behalf of the consortium) before the submission deadline (25 July 2019) to projects@eurekanetwork.org with reference to “EUREKA photonics call 2019” in the subject line.
  • Participants are obliged to ensure that they provide all mandatory forms and information in time and that their project proposal complies with the applicable national eligibility criteria.
 
Switzerland:
Swiss project partners should adhere to the Innosuisse funding rules, combining an industrial and academic partner on the Swiss side of the project. Please take into consideration that the proposal should be balanced in a way that the Swiss industrial partner has to carry at least the same amount of costs as the academic partner (University, RTO, University of Applied Science, etc.). The academic partner is 100% funded and receives a further 10% of the Innosuisse funding in cash from the industrial partner. The industrial partner receives in return on investment the right to exploit the project results in its business domain. A participation based on self-funding is also possible if the ability to finance the project costs in-kind can be demonstrated.
Participants are invited to contact their national project coordinators before submitting the documents in order to check the eligibility of the project idea and consortium and consult on possible alternative funding models if necessary. In addition to the centrally submitted EUREKA Project Application Form, Swiss partners need to submit a shortened Innosuisse project application form available on the call website.
 
Contacts

For Photonics 21 (partner search, advice on national funding rules and writing proposals)
Swissphotonics: Christoph Harder
harder@swissphotonics.net
+41 79 219 9051
https://www.swissphotonics.net/home

For Innosuisse (eligibility, funding synchronization)
Innosuisse: Claire Dové
claire.dove@innosuisse.ch
+41 58 466 79 51
https://www.innosuisse.ch/eureka
 
Contact: research@epfl.ch for administrative, financial, ethics and legal assistance.
Accessibility: General public
Admittance: Free
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"Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics" CECAM-MARVEL lecture

Roberto Car (Princeton University) & Michele Parrinello (ETHZ)

MARVEL and CECAM are hosting the second lecture in the series "Classics in molecular and materials modeling" at EPFL:

Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics
by Roberto Car and Michele Parrinello
followed by an interview with the speakers conducted by Giulia Galli (University of Chicago)
 
to be held at Auditorium BCH 2201, EPFL, on July 25 from 9:30 to 12:00. This lecture is the second in the series “Classics in molecular and materials modelling” hosted by CECAM (www.cecam.org/) and MARVEL (http://nccr-marvel.ch/) at EPFL. In this series, methods that have become fundamental tools in computational physics and chemistry will be presented by their originators at a level appropriate for second-year-master and graduate students. The lectures will be followed by an interview with the presenters: we’ll ask them to recall for us the period, problems, people and circumstances that accompanied the creation of milestone methods and algorithms that we now routinely use. The event will be recorded and followed by an apéro.
 


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EE Seminar: Comprehensive Observation in Embedded Systems; A Healthcare Wearable Example

Nima Taherinejad is an assistant professor at TU Wien with a research interest in self-aware cyber-physical systems, health-care, embedded systems, and systems on chip. He has authored two books and more than forty research articles and held several tutorials and talks regarding self-awareness (especially in health-care embedded systems) in reputable conferences and universities. He has received several awards and scholarships from universities and conferences he has attended, including the best paper award at MobiHealth 2017, Digilent Design Contest, and Week of Open-Source Hardware. Dr. Taherinejad is a co-founder and a co-organizer of Self-aware cyber-Physical Systems (SelPhyS) workshops. He chaired the "7th EAI International Conference on Wireless Mobile Communication and Healthcare (MobiHealth)" and served as the guest editor of "Mobile Networks and Applications (MONET) Journal" and "Sensors" which feature two special issues on mobile health-care and wearable medical devices.

Abstract : Design engineers continuously work on the common challenges that embedded systems face, however, some of these improvements are rather slow (e.g., battery life-time) and some of them are in contradictions with one another (e.g., better sensors and more complex algorithms against the battery life-time). This calls for a different type of solutions; self-aware system design. Self-aware systems monitor themselves, their resources, behavior, and environment to make decisions which bring them closer to their dynamic goals. Recently, system self-awareness methods have been used in Wearable Medical Devices such as Early Warning Score (EWS) and Epileptic Seizure detection, where they showed a great promise by reducing their power consumption (thus extending their usage time) and increasing their reliability. In this talk I will focus on simple principles of a comprehensive observation, as an enabler of self-awareness, and how these techniques can improve the performance of embedded systems. In particular, I present their usage in an example of EWS assessment using wearable devices.
 
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Are generative models the new sparsity?

Lenka Zdeborová

Abstract:
Sparse principle component analysis is being used in a range of applications and attracted interest of theoreticians for its algorithmically challenging properties. Sparsity is a widely explored way to reduce dimensionality. Another such way, that is recently widely studied, is learning generative models from data. In this talk I will discuss what happens when sparsity is replaced by generative models. I will present a detailed study of the spiked matrix model with the spike coming from generative model. I will show that the computational gap well-known in sparse principle component analysis does not exist in this case. I will discuss the behaviour of message passing algorithms and a construction and analysis of optimality-achieving spectral algorithms. Talk is based on arxiv:1905.12385.
 


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EE Seminar: From Deep Scaling to Deep Intelligence

Dr. Rajiv V. Joshi is a research staff member and key technical lead at T. J.Watson research center, IBM. He received his B.Tech I.I.T (Bombay, India), M.S (M.I.T) and Dr. Eng. Sc. (Columbia University). His novel interconnects processes and structures for aluminum, tungsten and copper technologies which are widely used in IBM for various technologies from sub-0.5μm to 14nm. He has led successfully predictive failure analytic techniques for yield prediction and also the technology-driven SRAM at IBM Server Group. He has extensively worked on novel memory designs. He commercialized these techniques. He received 3 Outstanding Technical Achievement (OTAs), 3 highest Corporate Patent Portfolio awards for licensing contributions, holds 58 invention plateaus and has over 225 US patents and over 350 including international patents. He has authored and co-authored over 190 papers. He has given over 45 invited/keynote talks and given several Seminars. He is awarded prestigious IEEE Daniel Noble award for 2018. He received the Best Editor Award from IEEE TVLSI journal. He is recipient of 2015 BMM award. He is inducted into New Jersey Inventor Hall of Fame in Aug 2014 along with pioneer Nicola Tesla. He is a recipient of 2013 IEEE CAS Industrial Pioneer award and 2013 Mehboob Khan Award from Semiconductor Research Corporation. He is a member of IBM Academy of technology. He served as a Distinguished Lecturer for IEEE CAS and EDS society. He is Distinguished visiting professor at IIT, Roorkie. He is IEEE, ISQED andWorld Technology Network fellow and distinguished alumnus of IIT Bombay. He is in the Board of Governors for IEEE CAS. He serves as an Associate Editor of TVLSI. He served on committees of ISCAS 2017, ISLPED (Int. Symposium Low Power Electronic Design), IEEE VLSI design, IEEE CICC, IEEE Int. SOI conference, ISQED and Advanced Metallization Program committees. He served as a general chair for IEEE ISLPED. He is an industry liaison for universities as a part of the Semiconductor Research Corporation. Also, he is in the industry liaison committee for IEEE CAS society. 

Abstract : Moore’s law driving the advancement in semiconductor industry over decades has been coming to a screeching halt and many researchers are convinced that it is almost dead. After revival and promise of artificial intelligence (AI) due to increased computational performance and memory bandwidth aided by Moore’s law there is overwhelming enthusiasm in researchers for increasing the pace of VLSI industry. AI uses many neural network techniques for computation which involves training and inference.
The advancement in AI requires energy efficient, low power hardware systems. This is more so for servers, main processors, Internet of Things (IoT) and System on chip (SOC) applications and newer applications in cognitive computing. In the light of AI this talk focuses on advanced technology issues, important circuit techniques for lowering power, improving performance and functionality in nanoscale VLSI design in the midst of variability. The same techniques can be used for AI specific accelerators.
Accelerator development for reduction in power and throughput improvement for both edge and data centric accelerators compared to GPUs used for Convolutional Neural (CNN) and Deep Neural (DNN) Networks are described. The talk covers memory (volatile and nonvolatile) solutions for CNN/DNN applications at extremely low Vmin. Finally, the talk summarizes challenges and future directions for circuit applications for edge and data-centric accelerators.
 
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“Studying functional significance of bone marrow adiposity in metabolic diseases”

Michaela TENCEROVA University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Institute of Physiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic

Bone fragility and fracture risk are overlooked complications affecting the quality of life in patients with metabolic diseases and they are often associated with higher accumulation of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT). BMAT originate from the bone marrow skeletal (also know as stromal or mesenchymal) stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and give rise, in addition to adipocytes, to osteoblast participating in bone formation. Opposite to peripheral adipose tissue there is limited information on a physiological role of BMAT in relation to bone and whole body energy metabolism. In this talk I will review our current findings on metabolic changes in BMAT phenotype and its effect on bone marrow microenvironment and stem cell properties.
 


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Lean Techniques in a Fabless Workflow

Prof. Wim Bogaerts, Ghent University

This event constists of two parts: First a presentation and second an interactive session. The interactive session is limited to 24 participants and sign-up is required (for the interactive session only).

Presentation: Using Lean techniques in a Fabless Research Workflow (13h15-14h15)
Lean is a collection of concepts and techniques that originated in the Japanese automobile industry but gained widespread adoption in many branches of manufacturing. Its philosophy revolves around reduction of ‘waste’ and continuous improvements, and translates itself in a more motivated and empowered workforce. Principles of Lean have gradually found their way into project management, notably under the umbrella of ‘Agile’, most notably in software development and startup environments. One of the last places where Lean is adopted is in Research, both academic and corporate. This is contradictory, since the principles of Lean should be extremely compatible with the scientific method. This presentation will introduce the concepts and basic principles of Lean and contrast them with traditional project management.
 
Interactive Session: The Fab game (14h30-18h)
After the presentation, we will apply the LEAN techniques in a specific research flow, taken from the world of Silicon Photonics. In this field, researchers doing a PhD often rely on an external foundry to fabricate chips. This creates bottlenecks in bringing their ideas all the way to a published papers. Through a series of simulation games, we will see ow we can apply the techniques to improve our workflow.

About the Speaker: Wim Bogaerts is a full professor in the Photonics Research Group of Ghent University and IMEC, Belgium. He specializes in silicon photonics, complex photonics integrated circuits and their design, and programmable photonics. Wim Bogaerts studied engineering (applied physics) in Ghent, and did a PhD in the Photonics Research Group of Ghent University-IMEC, building the design and technology foundations for IMEC's first silicon photonics technology platform on 200mm CMOS tools. This led to collaborations with tens of partners, growing into a silicon photonics multi-project-wafer service in IMEC, eventually known as ePIXfab. To enable the design of these photonic chips, Wim and his colleagues developed the software package IPKISS, a parametric design framework for photonic circuits.
In 2010, Wim became Professor at Ghent University, specializing in advanced design methodologies for integrated photonics, tackling the challenges that form the design gap for silicon photonics. With the growing industrial interest in silicon photonics, this know-how became ever more relevant for a larger community. In June 2014, he co-founded Luceda Photonics, a Ghent University - IMEC- VUB spin-off to bring the IPKISS software and other advanced design tools to the rapidly growing photonics market.
With Luceda Photonics successfully established in the Integrated photonics market, Wim returned in 2016 to his fundamental research interest, establishing a research activity in large-scale silicon photonics and programmable photonic circuits. On this topic he received the ERC consolidator grant PhotonicSwarm. He also teaches design and technology of photonic integrated circuits, both at the level of the M.Sc. program in Ghent, as in specialization courses. He is a very strong adept of Agile and Lean philosophies, with a passion to apply them to the peculiar ecosystem of academic research. He holds a black belt in lean. He is a member of IEEE, OSA, SPIE and the Scrum Alliance, as well as a travelling lecturer of the Optical Society (OSA).


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Conférence AMAM 2019

several internationally recognized experts

La recherche sur la manière dont les animaux et les humains excellent dans les mouvements adaptatifs, y compris la locomotion, peut aider les ingénieurs à améliorer les capacités d'adaptation des robots. En contrepartie, les robots peuvent être utilisés en tant qu'outils scientifiques pour explorer les principes de base des systèmes biologiques, en particulier les mécanismes neuromécaniques sous-tendant à leurs fascinantes capacités de locomotion. AMAM 2019 est la 9ème conférence internationale visant à créer des interactions fructueuses entre biologistes et ingénieurs intéressés par le mouvement adaptatif. Elle vise à réunir des chercheurs en robotique, biomécanique, neurosciences, sciences du sport et autres domaines liés au comportement dans les systèmes biologiques et artificiels.
Les collaborateurs de l'EPFL peuvent s'inscrire à la conférence (y compris les repas de midi et pauses café, mais pas le banquet) au prix réduit de 350 CHF (veuillez utiliser votre adresse courriel EPFL pour l'enregistrement). Détails sous https://amam2019.epfl.ch/register.php.


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Clinical Natural Language Processing

Assistant Professor Carsten Eickhoff from the Brown University

Clinical research has never been more active and diverse than it is at this moment. Research efforts span national and cultural borders and broad online dissemination of results makes insights available at a global scale with ever decreasing latency. In the face of these developments, individual researchers and practitioners are confronted with a seemingly intractable amount of material (approximately 1 Million scholarly articles are newly published in the life sciences each year). While highly trained human experts excel at making precision diagnoses, coverage, especially for uncommon conditions can be greatly improved. In this talk, we will discuss a range of (deep) machine learning techniques that provide automatic clinical decision support on the basis of large-scale data collections. I will present early and ongoing work on a) Predictive assistants in post-operative care of cardiac surgery patients, that serve as early warning systems in case of undesirable and dangerous complications. b) Automatic summarization of individually long patient records to obtain concise and topically targeted summaries for physicians. c) Data-driven diagnosis of rare diseases that individually occur too infrequently to allow clinical specialists to establish the necessary routine and experience.

Biography
Carsten is an assistant professor of medical and computer science at Brown University where he leads the Biomedical AI Lab, specializing in the development of data science and information retrieval techniques with the goal of improving patient safety, individual health and quality of medical care. Before coming to Brown, he studied artificial intelligence and machine learning at the University of Edinburgh, TU Delft and ETH Zurich. Carsten has authored more than 80 conference and journal articles on topics pertaining to automatic large-scale text processing and retrieval as well as information extraction from unstructured natural language resources. Aside from his academic endeavors, he is involved in several deep technology startups in the health sector that strive to translate technological innovation to improved safety and quality of life for patients.

(For your own information, the talk will be recorded and the webcast availlable few days after the talk presentation. Please, then check the following page for the webcast:  https://www.idiap.ch/en/talks/)


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A sneak peek with light into opaque materials

Prof. Dr. Sylvain Gigan

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture (Bonus Lecture)
Location will be confirmed.

Abstract: Complex heterogeneous materials, that scatter light in a highly complex way, present a huge challenge for imaging (think of seeing inside or through milk or in biological tissues). They are also a very interesting playground to study fundamental questions in wave physics. Very recently, we have shown that random light propagation in complex media can be leveraged for computational tasks. I will illustrate this concept through various examples, ranging from brain imaging to  optical computing (both classical and quantum). 

Bio: Sylvain Gigan is Professor of Physics at Sorbonne Université in Paris, and group leader in Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, at Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS, Paris). His research interests range from fundamental investigations of light propagation in complex media, biomedical imaging, sensing, signal processing,  to quantum optics and quantum information in complex media. He is also the cofounder of a spin-off:  LightOn (www.lighton.io) aiming at performing optical computing for machine learning and Big Data. 

This lecture is part of the IMT Distinguished Lecture Series. The lecture is considered as a bonus lecture for the class MICRO-626 (usual attendance requirement does not apply, but participation is highly encouraged).


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Scalable constrained optimization

Maria-Luiza Vladarean

EDIC candidacy exam
Exam president: Prof. Ali H. Sayed
Thesis advisor: Prof. Volkan Cevher
Co-examiner: Prof. Martin Jaggi

Abstract

Background papers

Almost surely constrained convex optimization, by Olivier Fercoq, Ahmet Alacaoglu, Ion Necoara, Volkan Cevher.
Lagrangian methods for composite optimization, by Shoham Sabach, Marc Teboulle.
Zeroth-order Nonconvex Stochastic Optimization: Handling Constraints, High-Dimensionality and Saddle-Points, by Krishnakumar Balasubramanian and Saeed Ghadimi.
 
 
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Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Engineering (SSBE)

[Keynotes] Viola VOGEL (ETH Zürich) & Diego GHEZZI (EPFL)

We are looking forward to welcoming you at Campus Biotech on Tuesday August 27, 2019, for the Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Engineering (SSBE)
 
Registration is now open and will close on August 12, 2019.


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Summer School 'Open Science in Practice' 2019

Various

Eurotech Summer School, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland - 2-6 September 2019

"Open" is the new black. Everybody talks about open science. But what does it mean exactly?

Open Access, Open Data, Open Source, reproducible science. Jargon or concrete action?

This summer school is for anyone interested in learning how to improve the quality and impact of research. The course will take place over five days, with a large part of the program dedicated to workshops and tutorials to learn useful tips and tricks that will make your life easier. Instructors will present their experience and expertise on how you can adopt open science tools and best practice to your research more efficient, reproducible, visible and impactful.

We bring together established scientists and early career researchers to provide a stimulating, yet friendly, learning environment. No preliminary knowledge of open science is required!

Registration deadline is Friday 19 July 2019, 17:00 CET

2 ECTS for doctoral students

More information on the course website.

Confirmed speakers include:

Rachael Ainsworth - Radio Astronomer, University of Manchester, UK
Adrien Ball - Senior Machine Learning Engineer, SNIPS, Paris, France
Anita Bröllochs - Head of Outreach, Protocols.io, USA
Fatma Deniz - Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California Berkeley, and Visiting Scientist, Technical University Berlin, Germany
Tim Head - Software Developer, Wild Tree Tech and Skribble
Stephan Heunis - PhD candidate at the Electrical Engineering department of the Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Michel Jaccard - Lawyer, Associate at id est avocats, Lausanne, Switzerland
Wenzel Jakob - Professor at the School of Computer and Communication Sciences, EPFL, Switzerland
Galina Limorenko - PhD candidate in the School of Life Sciences, EPFL, Switzerland
Charlotte Mazel-Cabasse - Executive Director of the Digital Humanities Center, UNIL-EPFL, Switzerland
Marc Robinson-Rechavi - Professor of Bioinformatics, UNIL, and Group Leader, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland
Melanie Röthlisberger - Senior Research and Teaching Associate, English Department, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Sina Rüeger - Postdoctoral Researcher, EPFL, Switzerland
Frédéric Schütz - Statistician, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland
Malvika Sharan - Computational Biologist, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Bruno Strasser - Professor of History of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Maximilian Strauss - Postdoctoral Researcher, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München and Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany
Jon Tennant - Rogue Palaeontologist, Interdisciplinary Research Center (CRI), Paris, France
Charlotte Teresa Weber - Researcher at The Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø, Norway
Martin Vetterli - Professor of Engineering and President at EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland


 


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Gene Regulation Workshop

Reuven Agami, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, NL Marina Chekulaeva, Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB), Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Berlin, DE Zoya Ignatova, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Hamburg, DE Dónal O'Carroll, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, UK Takashi Hiiragi, EMBL Heidelberg, DE Marc Timmers, University of Freiburg and DKFZ Heidelberg, DE

The workshop on gene regulation is a one-day long, yearly event with two main goals: we wish to give the opportunity to researchers in Switerland to keep abreast of the latest developments in the field of gene regulation, and we wish to give the occasion to young researchers, specifically master and doctoral students, as well as post-doctoral fellows, to hear and meet world re-knowns scientists, and to experience the excitement of scientific discussion. The meeting is organized accordingly. Thus: -the short length of the meeting (just one day) tailors it to researchers in Switerzland, who can travel in the morning, attend the entire meeting, and be back home in the evening. This format has the huge advantage of tremendously reducing the cost of attending the meeting, since there is no need for hotel stays. Moreover, registration is free. -We ask that the talks be 30 to 35 minutes long, leaving 10 to 15 minutes for questions. This allows the speakers to give a comprehensive introduction to the specific problem they are studying, and to the n describe their latest results at a comfortable pace, much different from the situation at many international meetings on gene expression where talks can be as short as 8 minutes! This format makes it easier not only for students, but also for experienced researchers who are not in the exact field of the speaker, to follow the talks. There is then ample time for discussion. Indeed, a characteristic of this meeting is the long question and answer period, which has on several occasions in the past years been quite memorable. To allow students to have time with the speakers, they will be able to register to have lunch with the speakers. This will allow them to interact with world-renowned scientists in the absence of any other professors, which is often intimidating for them.
 


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GaN for the Future

Prof. Dr. Debbie Senesky
Stanford University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/165147980

Abstract: There has been a tremendous amount of research and industrial investment in gallium nitride (GaN) as it is positioned to replace silicon in the billion-dollar (USD) power electronics industry, as well as the post-Moore microelectronics universe. In addition, the 2014 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded for pioneering research in GaN that led to the realization of the energy-efficient blue light-emitting diode (LED). Furthermore, GaN electronics have operated at temperatures as high as 1000°C making it a viable platform for robust space-grade electronics and nano-satellites.  Even with these major technological breakthroughs, we have just begun the “GaN revolution.” New communities are adopting this platform for a multitude of emerging device applications including the following: sensing, energy harvesting, actuation, communication, and photonics.  In this talk, we will review and discuss the benefits of GaN’s two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) over silicon’s p-n junction for these new and emerging applications.  In addition, we will discuss opportunities for transformational development of this semiconductor device platform (e.g., interface engineering, thermal metrology, selective-area doping) to realize future GaN-based electronic systems.
 
Bio: Debbie G. Senesky is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department and by courtesy, the Electrical Engineering Department. In addition, she is the Principal Investigator of the EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory (XLab).  Her research interests include the development of micro- and nano-scale sensors, high-temperature wide bandgap (GaN, SiC) electronics, and robust interface materials for operation within extreme harsh environments.   She received the B.S. degree (2001) in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California. She received the M.S. degree (2004) and Ph.D. degree (2007) in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. In addition, she has held positions at GE Sensing (formerly known as NovaSensor), GE Global Research Center, and Hewlett Packard.  She has served on the program committee of the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (Transducers), and International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S).  She is currently co-editor for IEEE Electron Device Letters, Sensors (journal), and Micromachines (journal).   In recognition of her work, she is a recipient of the Emerging Leader Abie Award from AnitaB.org, NASA Early Faculty Career Award, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Ph.D. Fellowship Award. More information about Prof. Senesky can be found at xlab.stanford.edu or on Instagram/Twitter: @debbiesenesky.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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[ National Information Event on the ERC Synergy Grant | Information session ]



Learn directly from the ERC on these most Prestigious Grants

ERC Synergy Grants enable 2-4 top researchers with complementary skills and knowledge to jointly address a research problem in an unprecedented way. The last Synergy Grant call under the current European framework programme for research and innovation will open in July and close in November 2019.
Join this event to find out more about these prestigious, highly attractive grants and what it takes to be competitive.

Agenda:
14:15–14:30    Registration and coffee

14:30–14:45    Welcome by Dr Judith Zbinden - NCP ERC and Climate - Euresearch Network Office

14:45–15:45    Presentation of the Synergy Grant and what it takes to be competitive by Dr Martin Penny - ERC Executive Agency

15:45–16:15    Perspective of a successful applicant by Prof Albert Hafner - University of Bern

16:15–16:30    Euresearch support by Dr Judith Zbinden - NCP ERC and Climate - Euresearch Network Office

16:45–17:30    Apero and bilateral discussions

Registration is required through the Euresearch web site.


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Effective Interactive Teaching

Siara Isaac

What strategies can I use to increase student participation? What potential advantages for student learning? At the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. explain the importance of using interactive teaching strategies;
  2. select appropriate teaching strategies to achieve learning objectives;
  3. construct effective interactive teaching scenarios.

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The impact of bone on whole organism physiology

Dr. Gerard Karsenty Professor and Chair – Genetics & Development Department, University of Columbia, New York, USA

We are using mouse genetics to ask whether we know, as we assume we do,  all the physiological functions fulfilled by each organ in mammals. This exploration is based on the belief that physiology, i.e., the science of how organs talk to each other to maintain a whole-organism homeostasis, has been stalled in the last 70 years or so. As a case in study we focus our efforts on the skeleton and are asking does bone have any other function besides making bone? Based on cell biological and clinical observations we have hypothesized that there must be a coordinated control, endocrine in nature, of bone growth, energy metabolism and reproduction. Exploring every tenet of this working hypothesis revealed, as it will be illustrated during the talk, that bone is a multipurpose endocrine organ that influences many more physiological processes than simply bone modeling and remodeling. Analysis of all the bone-regulated functions reveals a common feature shared by all of them. This in turn suggests that bone may have been invented as a survival tool for animals leaving the sea to live on land.
 


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EPFL 50th Anniversary - Research Days - EPFL Valais Wallis, Sion

Programme en cours / Programme coming soon.

The Research Days will bring together key political figures from the area, local industrial partners and academic partners of the EPFL campuses (Sion, Neuchâtel, Geneva, Fribourg, Lausanne). Covering the key themes of each site, the event’s objective is to show how research contributes or can contribute to society, both with political support and through collaboration with industry.

The theme of the event in EPFL Valais Wallis in Sion is Energy.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Microcity, Neuchâtel

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.

La thématique de l'événement à Microcity Neuchâtel est la Microtechnique.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Campus Biotech, Genève

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
La thématique de l'événement au Campus Biotech est la Recherche en neuro et sur le cerveau.
 


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2019 FAI/DIAS International Drone & Digital Aviation Conference



Êtes-vous prêts pour la nouvelle ère de l’aviation ?

Intitulée « Delivering the Future Digital Aviation Technologies to Enable Sustainable & Scalable Solution », la conférence réunit les acteurs internationaux majeurs de l’industrie, du monde scientifique et des agences intergouvernementales. Les interventions d'experts leaders dans leur domaine permettront de découvrir les derniers développements à travers une variété de points de vue. L’événement est une opportunité unique d’apprendre, d’échanger et de façonner la dimension aérienne de notre société digitale.

Au programme :

  • Les dernières innovations technologiques de l’EPFL, l’ETHZ, et de l’UZH
  • Défi souterrain de la DARPA : voler (sans pilote) sous terre
  • La vision de DJI pour un ciel plus sûr
  • Comment EHang veut « laisser l’humanité voler librement comme un oiseau »
  • Faire accepter la mobilité aérienne urbaine par le public
  • U-Space, le progrès de l’Europe pour rendre l’aviation sans pilote sûre, sécurisée, silencieuse, propre et efficace
  • Comment rcéer une nouvelle industrie digitale, par le CEO de Parrot
  • Qu’offrira Google Wing ?

Dans le contexte d’une avancée rapide de l’innovation technologique, la conférence représente un rendez-vous incontournable pour une interaction à l’échelle mondiale autour des drones et de l’aviation numérique. Suite au succès des deux précédentes éditions, cette 3ème édition continue de participer à la définition de l’avenir de l’industrie des drones, en établissant une relation durable entre l’aviation digitale et la société dans son ensemble.

La conférence a lieu dans le cadre des EPFL Drone Days 2019 et conjointement avec les Portes Ouvertes de l’EPFL. 30'000 visiteurs sont attendus. Une course de drones faisant partie du championnat mondial, l’EPFL Drone Racing Cup 2019, aura également lieu.
 
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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - BlueFactory Fribourg

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
La thématique de l'événement au BlueFactory à Fribourg est l'Eco-bâtiment et écologie.
 


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50e Anniversaire EPFL - Journées de la Recherche - Campus Lausanne

Programme en cours

Les journées de la recherche, ce sont des rencontres entre les personnalités politiques clés de la région, les partenaires industriels locaux ainsi que les partenaires académiques des campus EPFL (Sion, Neuchâtel, Genève, Fribourg, Lausanne) autour des thèmes phares de chaque site.
L’objectif est de démontrer ce que la recherche apporte ou peut apporter à la société, à la fois avec un soutien politique et à travers une collaboration avec l’industrie.
L'événement sur le Campus lausannois de l'EPFL se déclinera autour des projets phares et aura lieu durant les Portes ouvertes de l'EPFL (14 et 15 septembre 2019, https://www.epfl.ch/campus/events/fr/celebration/portes-ouvertes/).
 


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Brain-Computer Interfaces for Human Gait Restoration

Prof Zoran Nenadic, University of California Irvine, USA.

Neurological conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI) or stroke can cause significant gait impairments. These in turn have a profound effect on independence and quality of life of those affected. Sedentary lifestyle associated with these conditions can also lead to a number of medical comorbidities, which significantly augment their healthcare costs and presents a public health concern. In the U.S. alone, the primary and secondary healthcare costs associated with SCI and stroke are estimated to exceed $80 B/year. Currently, there are no biomedical solutions capable of reversing the loss of motor/sensory function after these conditions and best physiotherapies provide only a limited degree of recovery. Therefore, novel approaches to these conditions are in dire need. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), which aim to bypass neurological lesions by means of neurotechnology, may be a promising new approach to these conditions. In this presentation I will discuss how BCIs can be used for either neuroprosthetic or neurorehabilitation purposes to address gait impairments after SCI or stroke. Most of our work has been in the domain of noninvasive electroencephalogram-based BCIs, but some of our recent studies have explored the utility of invasive electrocorticogram-based BCIs.

Bio
Zoran Nenadic received a Diploma degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Belgrade (Serbia) and his M.S. and D.Sc. degrees in Systems Science and Mathematics from Washington University (St. Louis, MO). He was subsequently a postdoctoral scholar in Mechanical Engineering at California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA). Since 2005, he has been with the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) at University of California Irvine, where he is currently a full professor.
His research interests lie in neuroengineering with a focus on the development of technologies to restore or rehabilitate functions lost due to neurological conditions, such as spinal cord injury or stroke. His primary source of research support has been the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health. He has received several research awards, including the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the NSF and the Hiruma-Wagner Award from the Japanese Research Foundation for Opto-Science and Technology. His research accomplishments have been featured in numerous media outlets, including Time Magazine, Reuters, Fox Business, and The Doctors. For his teaching efforts, he received multiple BME Professor of the Year distinctions from the Engineering Student Council.


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title to be announced

Prof. Richard E. Lenski, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Education:
1973-76    B.A., Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH (USA)
1977-82    Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Positions:
1982-85    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (USA)
1984        Visiting Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (USA)
1985-88    Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1988-91    Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine, CA (USA)
1991-        Hannah Professor of Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA)


Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/715846975
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Effective Lecturing

Ingrid Le Duc

This workshop puts participants to practice lecturing by presenting 5 minutes of their teaching. Advice and feedback is given based to develop scientific communication skills appropriate for teaching


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title to be announced

Prof. Carole Bourquin, University of Geneva, CH

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Carole Bourquin effectue ses études de médecine et son doctorat à Genève. En 2000, elle obtient un PhD de biologie à l’institut Max-Planck de neuroimmunologie à Munich, avant de terminer sa formation en pharmacologie clinique à la Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. En parallèle, elle met sur pied son propre groupe de recherche à Munich pour étudier l’immunothérapie du cancer. En 2011, elle revient en Suisse en tant que professeure ordinaire de pharmacologie à l’Université de Fribourg, où elle devient rapidement vice-présidente du Département de médecine. Elle œuvre également à l’Hôpital fribourgeois où elle fonde et dirige l’unité de pharmacologie clinique. Depuis août 2016, Carole Bourquin est professeure ordinaire de pharmacologie à l’Université de Genève, nommée conjointement par les facultés des sciences (Section des sciences pharmaceutiques) et de médecine (Département d’anesthésiologie, pharmacologie et soins intensifs). Ses travaux de recherche pionniers en immuno-oncologie sont soutenus par le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique, Oncosuisse et le programme de recherche européen Horizon 2020. Elle est membre de plusieurs réseaux scientifiques dont le pôle de recherche national Bioinspired Nanomaterials et le réseau européen IMMUTRAIN.

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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Engineering PhD Summit on Intelligent Systems

Detailed program to be announced


The School of Engineering of EPFL is pleased to announce the 2nd annual PhD Summit, a workshop for final year PhD students interested in a career in academia. We invite to campus, on a competitive basis, a group of exceptional graduating PhD students from institutions worldwide.
Selected candidates will be invited to the EPFL campus in Switzerland to present their research and get informal feedback from top faculty of the School of Engineering. Each accepted student will be given the opportunity to visit EPFL laboratories related to the summit theme and have intensive exchange with the lab heads and the students.
The PhD Summit prize for the best presentation and research content will be awarded during the workshop.
Funds for travel and accommodation will be provided for the selected candidates.
The Engineering PhD Summit is organised by the School of Engineering, with the support of the School of Computer and Communication Sciences, the School of Life Sciences and the School of Basic Sciences.


ntelligent systems — software and/or hardware systems that can interact with their dynamic environments, process data, perform proper actions, and improve over time — are becoming ubiquitous. Advancements in information technology, artificial intelligence and control, computing capabilities, instrumentation, sensors and actuators have dramatically increased the pace at which intelligent systems enter our daily lives, e.g. in our software, smartphones, cars, robots, and infrastructure.
Intelligent systems involve exciting scientific and engineering questions: How can we push the technological limits to make intelligent systems more robust, more useful, more intuitive, better at improving and possibly repairing themselves? How can we approach the adaptive behavior exhibited in nature?
The Annual PhD Summit of the School of Engineering at EPFL will cover the theory, design, and applications of intelligent systems with an interdisciplinary perspective. Last year Ph.D. students working in fields such as robotics, embedded systems, internet of things, artificial intelligence, machine learning, computer games, human-computer interfaces, computational neuroscience, and cognitive science, with novel research contributions that fit into the general theme of Intelligent Systems are eligible to apply to the summit.

 
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Architects of Structural Biology: Bragg, Perutz, Kendrew and Hodgkin

Sir John Meurig Thomas The lecturer, a personal friend of Perutz, Kendrew, Klug, Hodgkin and Phillips, was formerly the Director of the Royal Institution of GB, former Head of the Department of Physical Chemistry and former Master of Peterhouse, University of Cambridge. He is a solid-state, surface and materials chemist and recipient of several awards, including the Willard-Gibbs, Pauling, Kapitza, Natta, Stokes, Davy and Faraday medals. A New mineral, meurigite, is named after him. He was awarded the Royal Medal for Physical Sciences by the Royal Society in 2016.

By John Meurig Thomas
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

When Max Perutz and John Kendrew, principal founders of structural molecular biology, set about, in the late 1940s, to solve the structures of haemoglobin and myoglobin, many scientists, notably developmental biologists and physiologists, ridiculed the name molecular biology and others accused them and their team, which later included Crick and Watson, of practicing biochemistry without license. Yet the revolution that they, Dorothy Hodgkin and their mentor Lawrence Bragg, initiated in the early 1950s led to a new era in modern medicine, and had a transformative influence on all aspects of biology.
In addition, the Laboratory of Molecular Biology (under the aegis of the U.K. Medical Research Council) that they established in 1962 in Cambridge, is arguably one of the most successful advanced research centres ever. Twenty three Nobel Laureates (11 of them from the USA) have worked there; and numerous medicines used world-wide for the treatment and cure of breast cancer, arthritis and life-threatening respiratory conditions have emerged from discoveries made there.
How was such a successful laboratory founded and managed? And how did the four protagonists – three chemists and a physicist – and other great contemporaries of theirs interact? This talk will address these questions and describe individual personalities, achievements, idiosyncrasies, and the roles of J. D. Bernal (friend of Picasso, Paul Robeson and Earl Mountbatten), Francis Crick, Aaron Klug and David Phillips, who solved the first structure of an enzyme at the Royal Institution (RI). It was at the RI, and later in Departments of Mineralogy and Textile Physics, that Bernal and Astbury first investigated the structures of “living molecules”. The rivalry between the Cambridge trio and the brilliant, charismatic, U.S. scientist Linus Pauling will also be discussed.
 


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title to be announced

Prof. Hari Shroff, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (USA)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Dr. Hari Shroff received a B.S.E. in bioengineering from the University of Washington in 2001, and under the supervision of Dr. Jan Liphardt, completed his Ph.D. in biophysics at the University of California at Berkeley in 2006 . He spent the next three years performing postdoctoral research under the mentorship of Eric Betzig at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus where his research focused on development of photactivated localization microscopy (PALM), an optical superresolution technique. Dr. Shroff is now chief of NIBIB's Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging laboratory, where he and his staff are developing new imaging tools for application in biological and clinical research.

Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/118303710
 
 
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Photonics Industry Day at the FORUM EPFL



The EPFL Photonics Chapter and Swissphotonics NTN organize the workshop “Photonics Industry in Switzerland” on October 10th during the next Forum EPFL 2019. 

Students need to register through their Forum EPFL account

Company representatives register via SwissPhotonics website: link


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Flexible Radios and Flexible Networks

Prof. Dr. Alyssa B. Apsel,
Cornell University

Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/637254875

Abstract: Over the past decades the world has become increasingly connected, with communications driving both markets and social movements.  Low power electronics, efficient communications, and better battery technology have all contributed to this revolution, but the cost and power required for these systems must be pushed further to make cheap, ubiquitous, seamless communication accessible to a wider community.   In this talk I will discuss two engineering approaches to this problem.  I will look at various approaches to drive the power down in radio networks that span across circuits and systems.  I will also look at creative biologically inspired approaches to enabling very low power networks and IoT.  Finally, I will discuss how by adding flexibility and building reconfigurable hardware, we can likewise build lower power and less costly consumer systems that can adapt across protocols and networks and work under changing device technologies.

Bio: Alyssa Apsel received the B.S. from Swarthmore College in 1995 and the Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, in 2002.  She joined Cornell University in 2002, where she is currently Director of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  She was a Visiting Professor at Imperial College, London from 2016-2018.  The focus of her research is on power-aware mixed signal circuits and design for highly scaled CMOS and modern electronic systems.  Her current research is on the leading edge of ultra-low power and flexible RF interfaces for IoT.  She has authored or coauthored over 100 refereed publications including one book in related fields of RF mixed signal circuit design, ultra-low power radio, interconnect design and planning, photonic integration, and process invariant circuit design techniques resulting in ten patents.  She received best paper awards at ASYNC 2006 and IEEE SiRF 2012, had a MICRO “Top Picks” paper in 2006, received a college teaching award in 2007, received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2004, and was selected by Technology Review Magazine as one of the Top Young Innovators in 2004.  She is a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE CAS for 2018-2019, and has also served on the Board of Governors of IEEE CAS (2014-2016) and as an Associate Editor of various journals including IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I and II, and Transactions on VLSI.  She has also served as the chair of the Analog and Signal Processing Technical committee of ISCAS 2011, is on the Senior Editorial Board of JETCAS, as Deputy Editor in Chief of Circuits and Systems Magazine, and as the co-founder and Chair of ISCAS Late Breaking News.  In 2016, Dr. Apsel co-founded AlphaWave IP Corporation, a multi-national Silicon IP provider focused on multi-standard analog Silicon IP solutions for the world of IOT.  As Chief Technology Officer of AlphaWave, Dr. Apsel led the company’s global research capability with offices in Silicon Valley, Toronto, and London. 

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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title to be announced

Prof. Kostas Kostarelos, The University of Machester, UK

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Kostas read Chemistry at the University of Leeds and obtained his Diploma in Chemical Engineering and PhD from the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London, studying the steric stabilization of liposomes using block copolymer molecules. He carried out his postdoctoral training in various medical institutions in the United States and has worked closely with Professors Th.F. Tadros (ICI plc, UK), P.F. Luckham (Imperial College London), D. Papahadjopoulos (UCSF, USA), G. Sgouros (Memorial Sloan-Kettering, NY, USA) and R.G. Crystal (Weill Medical College of Cornell University, NY, USA). Following his promotion to Assistant Professor of Genetic Medicine and Chemical Engineering in Medicine at Cornell University Weill Medical College, he relocated to the UK as the Deputy Director of Imperial College Genetic Therapies Centre in 2002. In 2003 Kostas joined the Centre for Drug Delivery Research and the Department of Pharmaceutics at the UCL School of Pharmacy as the Deputy Head of the Centre. He was promoted to the Personal Chair of Nanomedicine and Head of the Centre in 2007.
Kostas joined the University of Manchester in 2013 and is an Honorary Professor of University College London.

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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swissuniversities Open Science Action Plan: Kick-Off Forum



swissuniversities invites you to the Swiss Open Science Action Plan Kick-Off Forum

The open science working group initiated by swissuniversities in 2019 aims to broaden the open access strategy and its action plan in order to put Open Access, Open Data, Open Innovation, Citizen Science and Open Education under the umbrella of Open Science, from 2021 onward. This requires direct and close cooperation with all stakeholders, and in particular with the scientific community.

To promote the exchange and to gather fresh, inspiring and visionary ideas, swissuniversities invites you to the Kick-Off Forum of the Swiss Open Science Action Plan 2021-2024. This event will take place at the Forum Rolex of EPFL on Thursday October 17th, one day ahead of the Open Science Day, an event that is part of the EPFL 50th anniversary celebrations.

Participants
Every member of the Swiss scientific community interested in suggesting project ideas in the context of Open Science services and / or infrastructures that would ideally implement the Open Science National Strategy. Please note that the Swiss Open Science strategy will cover Open Access, Open Data, Open Innovation, Citizen Science and Open Education initiatives. 

Call for Ideas
We welcome the submission of posters (format A0) and videos (2 minutes maximum) in English, highlighting your ideas and inspiring visions regarding open and reproducible science in Switzerland. 
  • How do you envision the concrete implementation of open science in the next 5, 10 or 15 years in your field? 
  • What will be your added value and contribution to this field? 
  • Why do you think your idea is relevant not only for your community, but also for the scientific community in Switzerland?
Feeling inspired? 
Submit the final version of your posters and videos by September 9, 2019 via isci@swissuniversities.ch
The most inspiring and visionary ideas will be presented at the forum and a prize will be awarded to the best selected recipients.

Program
14:00-14:15 - Welcome Address: Martin Vetterli, President of EPFL
14:15-14:45 - Keynote Speaker: Mercè Crosas, Chief Data Science and Technology Officer, Harvard University
14:45-15:15 - Keynote Speaker: Fernando Pérez, University of California Berkeley
15:15-15:30 - From Open Science Strategy to Action Plan in Switzerland: Patrick Furrer
15:30-16:15 - Presentations of the best Open Science Posters & Videos: Aude Dieudé
16:15-16:30 - Prize for the Poster & Videos Presentations 
16:30-17:30 - Networking Aperitif

Important Dates
September 9, 2019 - Deadline for sending the finalized version of your posters & videos
October 17, 2019 - Open Science Action Plan Kick-Off Forum @ EPFL
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Open Science Day



To celebrate the 50th anniversary of EPFL, its President Martin Vetterli invites you to explore what is Open Science with world-class researchers and influential policy makers. How can we successfully transition to digital scholarship? What will knowledge production and dissemination resemble in the future? This day will be dedicated to discussing the promises and challenges of open and reproducible science in various disciplines present at EPFL, from the life sciences to particle physics.
 
The event will take place in the main auditorium of the landmark Rolex Learning Center on EPFL Campus. It is free of charge and is open to everyone. However, registration is required.
 
MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION HERE
 
Open science is a complex and transversal topic that can only be understood when a variety of point of views collide. We are honored to confirm that the following people have accepted our invitation to share their expertise with the participants:
 
Sir Philip Campbell, Editor-in-Chief Springer Nature
Ingrid Daubechies, Duke University
Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General
Maria Leptin, EMBO Director
José Moura, IEEE President Elect
Fernando Perez, University of California Berkeley
Robert-Ian Smits, TU/e Executive Board President
Marcel Salathé, EPFL
Bruno Strasser, University of Geneva
Jeannette Wing, Columbia University

 


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title to be announced

Prof. Zusanna Siwy, University of California, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Dr. Zuzanna S. Siwy received her PhD in 1997 from the Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poalnd, and habilitation in 2004. From 2000–2003 she was a Fellow of the Foundation for Polish Science, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at the Institute for Heavy Ions Research (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. After conducting postdoctoral research at the University of Florida, Gainesville, in July 2005, Dr. Siwy joined the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine. In 2007, she became the Fellow of the Alfred von Sloan Foundation. In 2009, Dr. Siwy was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers as well as the Bessel Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Her current research interests focus on using synthetic nanopores as templates for biomimetic channels as well as ionic diodes and ionic transistors.

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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title to be announced

Prof. Michael B. Elowitz, Caltech, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Michael B. Elowitz is a biologist and professor of Biology, Bioengineering, and Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, and investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2007 he was the recipient of the Genius grant, better known as the MacArthur Fellows Program for the design of a synthetic gene regulatory network, the Repressilator, which helped initiate the field of synthetic biology. In addition, he showed, for the first time, how inherently random effects, or 'noise', in gene expression could be detected and quantified in living cells,leading to a growing recognition of the many roles that noise plays in living cells. His work in Synthetic Biology and Noise represent two foundations of the field of Systems Biology.

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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The LIMNA symposium on Emerging Topics and Technologies in Metabolism

Confirmed speakers: Karine Clément, Sorbonne Université, Paris, France Jorge Ferrer, Cente for Genomic regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Spain Arvand Haschemi, Medical University of Vienna, Austria Zoltan Kutalik, University of Lausanne, Switzerland Susanne Mandrup, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Samuel Nobs, Weizmann Institute of Science, Reẖovot, Israel Ganna Panasyuk, Necker Enfants Malades Institute (INEM), Paris, France   Short talks will be selected from submitted abstracts.

 The registration to the LIMNA Symposium on October 29, 2019 at the Olympic Museum, Lausanne is now open! The LIMNA symposium on Emerging Topics and Technologies in Metabolism will gather speakers using “next-generation” approaches (systems genetics, omic, computation) to study metabolism-related processes and tissues.

Registration is now open!
Deadline for abstract submission: 01.09.2019
Deadline for registration only (registration is free but mandatory) : 01.10.2019 Participation will be likely recognized by the Federation of Swiss Cantonal Veterinary Officiers as a half day of ongoing training.
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Merging Humans and Machines with Hydrogel Technology

Prof. Dr. Xuanhe Zhao,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/385971995

Abstract: While human tissues and organs are mostly soft, wet and bioactive; machines are commonly hard, dry and biologically inert. Bridging human-machine interfaces is of imminent importance in addressing grand societal challenges in healthcare, security, sustainability, education and joy of living. However, interfacing human and machines is extremely challenging due to their fundamentally contradictory properties. At MIT SAMs Lab, we propose to harness “hydrogel technology” to form long-term, high-efficacy, compatible and seamless interfaces between humans and machines. On one side, hydrogels with similar mechanical and physiological properties as tissues and organs can naturally integrate with human body over the long term, greatly alleviating the foreign body response and mechanical mismatches. On the other side, the hydrogels with intrinsic or integrated electrodes, optical fibers, sensors, actuators and circuits can effectively bridge external machines and human bodies via electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical interactions. In this talk, I will first discuss the mechanisms to design extreme properties for hydrogels, including tough, resilient, adhesive, strong and antifatigue, for long-term robust human-machine interfaces.  Then I will discuss a set of novel hydrogel devices that interface with the human body, including i). hydrogel neural probes capable of electro-opto-fluidic interrogation of single neurons in mice over life time; ii). ingestible hydrogel pills capable of continuously monitoring core-body physiological conditions over a month;  and iii). untethered fast and forceful hydrogel robots controlled by magnetic fields for minimal invasive operations. I will conclude the talk by proposing a systematic approach to design next-generation human-machine interfaces based on hydrogel technology.

Bio: Xuanhe Zhao is an associate professor in mechanical engineering at MIT. His research group designs soft materials that possess unprecedented properties to address grant societal challenges. Dr. Zhao is the recipient of the early career award and young investigator award from National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Society of Engineering Science, American Vacuum Society, Adhesion Society, Materials Today, Journal of Applied Mechanics, and Extreme Mechanics Letters. He held the Hunt Faculty Scholar at Duke, and the d'Arbeloff Career Development Chair and Noyce Career Development Professor at MIT. He was selected as a highly cited researcher by Web of Science in 2018.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program.


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title to be announced

Prof. Camilla Foged, University of Copenhagen, DK

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
  • Professor of Vaccine Design and Delivery at the Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, 2018-present
  • Group Leader at the Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, 2014-present
  • Associate Professor at the Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, 2008-2018
  • Post.Doc/Assistant Research Professor at the Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, 2004-2008 (maternity leave in 2005)
  • Research Assistant at the Division of Hematology, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, 2004
  • Research Assistant at the Department of Pharmaceutics, the Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2003
  • Doctoral Fellow at the Department of Pharmaceutics, The Royal Danish School of Pharmacy, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1999-2003 (maternity leave in 2002)
  • Research Fellow at Novo Nordisk A/S, Gentofte/Bagsværd, Denmark, 1996-1998
  • ERASMUS Student at Dipartimento di Biotechnologie (DIBIT), Ospedale San Raffaele, and Universitá delgi Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy, 19
Zoom link for attending remotely:
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title to be announced

Prof. Barbara Treutlein, ETHZ,CH

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Barbara Treutlein is Associate Professor of Quantitative Developmental Biology at D-BSSE. Her research focuses on human developmental biology, with a focus on how complex organs such as the liver and brain form. Barbara was a Tenure Track Assistant Professor at the Technical University of Munich and Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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Effective exercise sessions

Roland Tormey

Exercise sessions provide students with an opportunity to apply the things they have learned in lectures, to deepen their understanding, to clarify problems and to monitor their own learning.

    What are the features of exercise sessions that best help student to learn?
    How can exercises be adapted to help students deepen their understanding?
    What approaches can be used to monitor student progress?
    How can feedback be provided in manageable but effective ways?


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Améliorer l'expressivité et sa voix pour ses cours

Rita Gay

Comment penser son contenu pou pouvoir bien le dire? En quoi la voix est une résultante du corps en action? Quelles technique vocales mettre en œuvre et exercer?


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title to be announced

Prof.  Liana Silva, University of Lisbon (PT)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
LC Silva graduated in Biochemistry in 2001 at the Faculty of Sciences, Universidade de Lisboa (UL), Portugal, and obtained her PhD degree in Chemistry (Molecular Biophysics) in 2006 at the Instituto Superior Técnico (IST-UL). She developed her post-doctoral project at the interface between molecular biophysics and biochemistry as a research fellow at the Weizmann Institute of Science (WIS), Israel and at the IST (2007-2009). In 2009, she was awarded a Ciência 2008 Research position to set her research team focused on Molecular & Cellular Biophysics at the Faculty of Pharmacy from the UL. She currently holds an Investigator FCT research position at the same institution. LC Silva has an interdisciplinary background in biochemistry and cell biology, quantitative photophysics and molecular biophysics. Her research is multidisciplinary and bridges membrane biophysics and cell biology. She is interested in understanding the role of membrane biophysical properties in cell function and pathology. Her research is focused on membrane lipids and their interplay in biological membranes, aiming at evaluating their role in membrane organization and function, and to provide the molecular tools to develop improved therapeutics.

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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title to be announced

Prof. Dagmar Wachten, University of Bonn, DE

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
Academic qualifications
  • 2014 Habilitation: Molecular Biomedicine, University of Bonn, Germany
  • 2006 Doctorate: Dr. rer. nat., Biology (Biochemistry), University of Cologne, Germany
  • 1998 - 2003 Diploma, Biology, University of Cologne, Germany

Postgraduate professional career
  • 2017 - pres. Professor (W2) for Biophysical Imaging at the Institute of Innate Immunity
  • 2014 - 2017 Max Planck Research Group Leader (W2), Minerva Max Planck Research Group “Molecular Physiology”, Research Center caesar, Bonn
  • 2009 - 2013 Project Group Leader, Research Group „Molecular Physiology“, caesar, an Institute of the Max Planck Society, Bonn
  • 2007 - 2009 Postdoctoral research fellow, Laboratory of Molecular Signaling, Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK
  • 2006 Postdoc, Research Center Jülich, Germany
  • 2003 - 2006 PhD thesis, Institute for Biological Information Processing,Prof. U.B. Kaupp, Research Center Jülich, Germany

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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Dr. Silvano De Franceschi - IMT Distinguished Lecture

Dr. Silvano De Franceschi
CEA-INAC


Institute of Microengineering - Distinguished Lecture

Campus Lausanne SV 1717 (live)
Campus Microcity MC B0 302 (video)
Zoom Live Stream: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/982557518

Abstract and Bio to follow.

Note: The Seminar Series is eligible for ECTS credits in the EDMI doctoral program


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title to be announced

Prof. Jussi Taipale, Cambridge University (UK)

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
To be provided.

Zoom link for attending remotely:  https://epfl.zoom.us/j/855402627
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title to be announced

Prof. Julie Champion, Georgia Tech, USA

WEEKLY BIOENGINEERING COLLOQUIA SERIES
(sandwiches served)

Abstract:
To be provided.

Bio:
  • Developing therapeutic protein materials, where the protein is both the drug and the delivery system
  • Engineering proteins to control and understand protein particle self-assembly
  • Repurposing and engineering pathogenic proteins for human therapeutics
  • Creating materials that mimic cell-cell interactions to modulate immunological functions for various applications, including inflammation, cancer, autoimmune disease, and vaccination
B.S.E 2001, University of Michigan Ph.D. 2007, University of California, Santa Barbara  

Zoom link for attending remotely:
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Lecture Demonstrations in the age of YouTube

Ilya Eigenbrot

Demonstrations have been used to make lectures more interesting and accessible for a very long time – but is there any point in investing time and effort into demonstrations in the age of smartphones and instant YouTube clips? This workshop will discuss this question, as well as give practical tips on designing and using demonstrations in different settings. You will also get the chance to design one or more demos relevant to your own area of teaching expertise. Facilitated by Ilya Eigenbrot with 20 year experience in the popularisation of science.


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Assessment Matters

Roland Tormey

To develop assessment techniques which are valid and objective, notably to test if students have met the required learning outcomes.


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Leveraging Labs for Learning

Siara Isaac

Explore ways to design lab experiments that help students develop a scientific approach which is transferable to real world complexity.


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