Upcoming Seminars and Events

IMX Seminar Series - Biologically fabricated materials from engineered microbes

Prof. Neel Joshi, Northeastern University, USA

The intersection between synthetic biology and materials science is an underexplored area with great potential to positively affect our daily lives, with applications ranging from manufacturing to medicine. My group is interested in harnessing the biosynthetic potential of microbes, not only as factories for the production of raw materials, but as fabrication plants that can orchestrate the assembly of complex functional materials. We call this approach “biologically fabricated materials”, a process whose goal is to genetically program microbes to assemble materials from biomolecular building blocks without the need for time consuming and expensive purification protocols or specialized equipment. Accordingly, we have developed Biofilm Integrated Nanofiber Display (BIND), which relies on the biologically directed assembly of biofilm matrix proteins of the curli system in E. coli. We demonstrate that bacterial cells can be programmed to synthesize a range of functional materials with straightforward genetic engineering techniques. The resulting materials are highly customizable and easy to fabricate, and we are investigating their use for practical uses ranging from bioremediation to engineered therapeutic probiotics. Another project in the group focuses on fabricating bioplastics from engineered microbes producing customized curli fibers.
Bio: Neel Joshi is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Northeastern University. He completed his PhD at UC Berkeley in the lab of Matt Francis and a postdoc at Boston University in the lab of Mark Grinstaff before starting his independent academic career at Harvard University and then moving to Northeastern in 2020. He is broadly interested in topics related to biologically inspired materials, protein engineering, self-assembly, and biointerfaces. His group works at the intersection of biomaterials science and synthetic biology. Recent projects in the group have focused on repurposing bacterial biofilms and their matrix proteins for biotechnological and biomedical applications.
 


Read more

Citation Best Practices

EPFL Library Teaching Team

Citing correctly requires the acquisition of the right habits. This workshop will walk you through various citation cases that you may encounter during the writing process of reports or publications. At the end of the workshop, you will be able to:
  • understand the stakes of citation,
  • reuse different types of content without committing plagiarism,
  • cite your sources correctly, within the text and in the bibliography.

Read more

Campus Lecture : Apollo's Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way we Live

Nicholas Christakis, Professor of Social and Natural Science at Yale University, USA

Using up-to-the-moment information, and drawing on epidemiology, medicine, public health, sociology, economics, history, virology, and other fields, Nicholas Christakis explores what it means to live in a time of plague — an experience that is paradoxically uncommon to the vast majority of humans who are alive, yet deeply fundamental to our species.  Unleashing new divisions in our society as well as new opportunities for cooperation, this 21st-century pandemic has upended our lives in ways that test our frayed collective culture.  Apollo’s Arrow envisions what happens when the great force of a deadly germ meets the enduring reality of our evolved social nature.


Read more

IMX Talks - Electron dynamics in materials from first principles

Prof. Marco Bernardi, Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology

Recent progress in combining density functional theory with the Boltzmann equation are enabling spectacular advances in computing electron dynamics in materials from first principles. The interaction between electrons and lattice vibrations (phonons) plays a central role in these studies as it governs electron dynamics near room temperature. I will present our recently developed methods to compute electron-phonon interactions from first principles, and show how these advances enable calculations of charge transport and ultrafast dynamics in materials. The talk will focus on:
1) First-principles calculations of the carrier mobility, providing new insight into the mechanisms governing charge transport in semiconductors and oxides. I will discuss challenges for investigating complex materials, including those with polar bonds, structural phase transitions, strong electron-phonon interactions leading to polaron formation, and crystallographic defects.
2) Accurate simulations of materials out of equilibrium, focusing on a numerical approach to investigate the coupled ultrafast dynamics of electrons and phonons. I will demonstrate how this framework can compute time-domain absorption, diffraction and photoemission with quantitative accuracy in bulk and two-dimensional materials. Extensions to treat materials with strongly bound excitons will also be discussed.
3) Finally, I will highlight our efforts to develop an open source code, PERTURBO, that makes these new computational methods and workflows available to the community. The code’s unique capabilities, which will be described, equip us with broadly applicable quantitative tools to investigate electron interactions and dynamics in materials.
The talk will conclude with a discussion of the “quantum frontier” of this emerging field, focusing on studies of electron dynamics in quantum materials – both topological and correlated – and decoherence in qubit devices.
Bio: Marco Bernardi is assistant professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science at Caltech. He received his Ph.D. in Materials Science from MIT, where he worked with Prof. Jeff Grossman on novel materials and physical processes for solar energy conversion. He was a postdoc in the Physics Department at UC Berkeley, where, working with Profs. Steve Louie and Jeff Neaton, he developed new theoretical approaches for investigating excited electrons in materials. Marco's group at Caltech develops quantum mechanical calculations aimed at understanding the dynamics of electrons in materials, with application to electronics, optoelectronics, energy, quantum technologies and ultrafast science. Marco received the NSF CAREER Award in 2018, the AFOSR Young Investigator Award in 2017, the Psi-K Volker Heine Young Investigator Award for electronic structure calculations in 2015, and the Intel Ph.D. Fellowship in 2013. His work favors quantitative analysis and accurate computational approaches to understand the physics and potential applications of novel materials, charting new directions in materials theory.
 


Read more

EPFL BioE Talks SERIES "Inference of Bacterial Dynamics in the Digestive Tract"

Prof. Claude Loverdo, Laboratoire Jean Perrin, CNRS - Sorbonne Université, Paris (F)

WEEKLY EPFL BIOE TALKS SERIES
 
(note that this talk is number one of a double-feature seminar - see details of the second talk here)

Abstract:
In many animals, the digestive tract is home to a very important microbiota, both in numbers and in function. While direct in vivo visualization of the microbiota is possible for some small animals, it is in general not experimentally feasible. One tool to study the gut microbiota in vivo is to use tagged bacteria: comparing distribution of tags at different moments in the experiment we infer biologically relevant parameters using stochastic models of bacterial population dynamics and branching processes. We confront estimates produced by different methods for assessing the model validity, and extend to more realistic bacterial replication. We contributed to show that one main physical effect of antibodies, the main effector of the adaptive immune response secreted in the gut, is to cross-link bacteria into clusters as they divide, preventing them from interacting with epithelial cells, thus protecting the host. We then developed a simple ordinary differential equations model of these bacterial clusters, and studied how the interplay of the time scales of bacterial growth and of link breaking could enable the immune system to target the most problematic bacteria.

Bio:
Trained as a physicist, Claude Loverdo develops models at the interface with biology, in collaboration with experimentalists. She did a physics PhD on first passage time in biological systems in Paris, France, then a post-doc modeling infectious diseases at UCLA, USA, and then at the ETH, Switzerland. She has been a CNRS researcher at Sorbonne Université since 2014.


Zoom link (with registration) for attending remotely: https://go.epfl.ch/EPFLBioETalks


IMPORTANT NOTICE: due to restrictions resulting from the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, this seminar can be followed via Zoom web-streaming only, (following prior one-time registration through the link above).
Read more

Black Holes as Extreme Quantum Information Processors

Prof. Brian Swingle, University of Maryland

It is often suggested that our theory of spacetime and gravity is in tension with quantum theory, for example, that quantum information might be lost in black holes. However, recent developments suggest that spacetime and gravity actually emerge from complex patterns of quantum information. I will review these developments with a focus on the physics of black holes in certain well controlled models of quantum gravity. Along the way, I will highlight many connections to the physics of chaotic quantum many-body systems. To conclude, I will argue that these connections between quantum gravity and quantum information offer a new route to quantum gravity in the lab: the potential to use a quantum computer to simulate otherwise impossible experiments probing the quantum nature of spacetime.


Read more

EPFL BioE Talks SERIES "Hydrodynamic Flow and Concentration Gradients in the Gut Enhance Neutral Bacterial Diversity"

Prof. Anne-Florence Bitbol, Institute of Bioengineering, EPFL, Lausanne (CH)

WEEKLY EPFL BIOE TALKS SERIES

(note that this talk is number two of a double-feature seminar - see details of the first talk here)

Abstract:
The gut microbiota features important genetic diversity, and the specific spatial features of the gut may shape evolution within this environment.
We investigate the fixation probability of neutral bacterial mutants within a minimal model of the gut that includes hydrodynamic flow and resulting gradients of food and bacterial concentrations. We find that this fixation probability is substantially increased compared to an equivalent well-mixed system, in the regime where the profiles of food and bacterial concentration are strongly spatially-dependent. Fixation probability then becomes independent of total population size. We show that our results can be rationalized by introducing an active population, which consists of those bacteria that are actively consuming food and dividing. The active population size yields an effective population size for neutral mutant fixation probability in the gut.

Bio:
Anne-Florence Bitbol studied physics at ENS Lyon (F). Her PhD at Université Paris-Diderot, advised by Prof. Jean-Baptiste Fournier, focused on the statistics and dynamics of complex membranes, using statistical and soft matter physics to understand how lipid bilayers are perturbed by proteins or by local chemical perturbations. She then chose to move even closer to biology, as a postdoc in the Biophysics Theory Group at Princeton University, led by Profs. Ned Wingreen, Bill Bialek and Curt Callan. There, she investigated the self-assembly of multi-protein complexes, and she also worked on evolution in rugged fitness landscapes with David Schwab. Next, she became a CNRS researcher at Laboratoire Jean Perrin, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, Sorbonne Université in Paris, before moving to EPFL, where she is a Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in the Institute of Bioengineering and the School of Life Sciences. She is broadly interested in understanding biological phenomena in a quantitative way, through physical concepts as well as mathematical and computational tools. Her current research focuses on two main axes: the sequence-function mapping in proteins, and the evolution of microbes on complex fitness landscapes and in complex environments.


Zoom link (with registration) for attending remotely: https://go.epfl.ch/EPFLBioETalks


IMPORTANT NOTICE: due to restrictions resulting from the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, this seminar can be followed via Zoom web-streaming only, (following prior one-time registration through the link above).
Read more

Packaging and Hybridization: the Valorization of MEMS Technologies

Dr. Michel Despont

Abstract: The integration of microsystems and, in particular, of MEMS devices continues to be a key element of many high technology application areas. If the devices themselves are crucial elements for innovation, their integration in a complete microsystem are essential for their successful commercialization. Hence development of 3D integration and packaging technologies are of the upmost importance. At CSEM we develop new solutions for wafer level hybridization and packaging solutions to respond to the demand of the industry active in microsystem technology. An overview of the packaging and hybridization technology will be presented along with some concrete examples such are biocompatible hermetic packaging for active implant, wafer level gas cell for atomic clock, wafer level hybridization for complex micromechanical components, heterogeneous integration of microdevices at wafer level, MEMS integration on soft micromodule.

Bio: Dr. Michel Despont received a Ph.D. in physics from the Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Switzerland, in 1996. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the IBM Research - Zurich laboratory in 1996, he spent one year as a visiting scientist at the Seiko Instrument Research Laboratory in Japan. In 2005, he was appointed manager and led the nanofabrication group at IBM Research – Zurich Laboratory. Since 2013, Dr Despont is currently employed by the Swiss Centre of Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) as Vice-President of the MEMS program and manager of the Emerging Micro&Nano Technologies section in the Micro&Nano Systems division.

CSEM Website.

This seminar is part of the Master's class MICRO534, Advanced MEMS and Microsystems, and is open to the informed public.


Read more

MechE Colloquium: Journey at the center of a recommender

Prof. Anne-Marie Kermarrec, Scalable Computing Systems Laboratory (SaCS), EPFL School of Computer and Communication Sciences (IC), Institute of Computer and Communication Sciences (IINFCOM)

Abstract:
Computing systems that make human sense of big data, usually called personalization systems or recommenders, and popularized by Amazon and Netflix, essentially help Internet users extracting information of interest to them. Leveraging machine learning techniques, research on personalization has mainly focused on improving the quality of the information extracted. Yet, building an operational recommender goes far beyond, especially in a world where data is not only big but also changes very fast. This talk will discuss system challenges to scale to a large number of users and a growing volume of fastly changing data to provide real-time personalization.

Bio:
Anne-Marie Kermarrec is Professor at EPFL (Switzerland) since January 2020. Before that she was the CEO of the Mediego startup that she founded in April 2015. Mediego provides content personalization services for online publishers. She was a research director at Inria, France from 2004 to 2015. She got a PhD thesis from University of Rennes (France), and has been with Vrije Universiteit, NL and Microsoft Research Cambridge, UK. Anne-Marie received an ERC grant in 2008 and an ERC proof of Concept in 2013. She received the Montpetit Award in 2011 and the Innovation Award in 2017 from the French Academy of Science. She has been elected to the European Academy in 2013 and named ACM Fellow in 2016. Her research interests are large-scale distributed systems, peer to peer networks and system support for machine learning.
Read more

MARVEL Distinguished Lecture - Georg Kresse

Georg Kresse, University of Vienna

https://epfl.zoom.us/j/83610384294
Passcode: 4258

Prof. Georg Kresse
Professor of Computational Materials Physics at the University of Vienna

Finite temperature properties with first principles accuracy, is machine learning the way to go?
Accurate predictions of phase transition temperatures have always been a dream of materials physicists. Using first principles methods calculations are usually extremely time-consuming and challenging, whereas force fields without extensive and careful tuning tend to provide inaccurate answers. Machine-learned force fields are an obvious solution to this dilemma but training them can be a time-consuming and laborious process.
In this talk, I demonstrate that training on the fly yields highly accurate machine-learned force fields (MLFF) that meet the challenges of predicting finite temperature properties with an accuracy close to the original first-principles method. Our machine learning approach is based on Bayesian regression and uses a combination of radial and angular features computed locally for each atom. The Bayesian regression not only provides predictions for the energies, forces, and stress tensor, but also predicts the uncertainty of these predictions. If the uncertainties exceed a certain threshold, first principles calculations are performed “on the fly”, the structure is added to the training data set, and the MLFF is refined "on the fly". Training is performed simply by heating (or cooling) all phases of interest. Typically, an accurate force field can be obtained in few days and the training requires no special intervention or expertise from the user.
The accuracy of the approach is demonstrated for several materials. For metallic zirconium, our simulations successfully reproduce the first order displacive martensitic phase transition from hcp to bcc Zr [1]. For Zr, we also show that the MLFF reproduces phonon dispersions and elastic properties with excellent precision. Zirconia (ZrO2) constitutes a more challenging test, with two phase transitions from monoclinic to tetragonal to cubic. Again, the MLFF yields excellent predictions for both transition temperatures [2]. Moreover, we are able to predict the thermal conductivity in very good agreement with experiment. Melting temperatures of Al, Si, Ge, Sn and MgO are predicted using ML-FF trained using various density functionals [3]. In this case, we show that the differences between different density functionals are far larger than the errors introduced by ML. Finally, we address the phase transitions in hybrid perovskites – a class of materials promising for thin film solar cells. Specifically, we calculate the phase transition temperatures of MAPbO3 and several other organic perovskites and find again very good agreement with experiment [4].
Apart of demonstrating that on the fly MLFFs provide excellent predictions on par with the original density functional, we also show that diverse methods are required to calculated phase transition temperatures: these include slow heating and cooling (Zr), thermodynamic integration (ZrO2), interface pinning (melting temperatures) as well as umbrella sampling (MAPbI3) and free energy perturbation theory.
[1] P. Liu, C. Verdi, F. Karsai, and G. Kresse, submitted
[2] C. Verdi, F. Karsai, P. Liu, R. Jinnouchi, and G. Kresse, submitted
[3] R. Jinnouchi, F. Karsai, G. Kresse, Phys. Rev. B 100, 014105 (2019).
[4] R. Jinnouchi, J. Lahnsteiner, F. Karsai, G. Kresse, and M. Bokdam, 
Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 225701 (2019).


About the speaker
Professor Georg Kresse received his doctoral degree from the Vienna  University of Technology in 1993. After his habilitation at the Vienna University of Technology in 2001, he was offered a full professorship by both the University of Oxford and the University of Vienna in 2006.  In 2007 he accepted the chair for Computational Quantum Mechanics in Vienna. Since 2011 Kresse is a full member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and since 2012 of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences. He is the recipient of several awards, including the 2003 "START Grant" of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), the "Hellmann Preis" of the Internationale Working group for  Theoretical Chemistry, and the Kardinal-Innitzer-Preis in 2016.
His main research interests are Theoretical Solid State Physics, Surface Sciences and Computational Materials Physics. His work on ab initio density functional theory has shaped the application of density functional theory in materials sciences worldwide. Georg Kresse is the main author and developer of the computer program "VASP" (Vienna ab initio simulation package), which is  the most widely used program for quantum mechanical simulations of solids and their surfaces. The three publications on the algorithms implemented in VASP have been cited between 40.000 and 65.000 times each and belong to the 100 most cited research articles ever published.
His current work focuses on the precise description of electron interactions in solids and real materials and encompasses modern perturbative many-body theory, quantum Monte Carlo methods, and machine learning. Georg Kresse is the author of more than 400 research articles. With a Web of Sciences h-index of over 105 he is among the most cited physicists worldwide.


Did you miss previous MARVEL Distinguished Lectures? You can watch them on the Materials Cloud dedicated page.

 
Read more

Doctoriales en ligne du Réseau d’excellence des sciences de l’ingénieur de la francophonie (RESCIF)



L’un des objectifs du RESCIF est de développer des recherches utiles au développement de ses pays membres. Il s’agit en particulier de promouvoir des programmes scientifiques communs, notamment dans les domaines de l’eau, de la nutrition, de l’énergie, de la sécurité alimentaire et de l’urbain. Des secteurs cruciaux, plus spécialement pour certains pays du sud, soumis à des conditions climatiques et à des problèmes de sécurité alimentaire extrêmement difficiles. Les travaux de recherche sont réalisés par des étudiant-e-s et en particulier des doctorant-e-s dans le cadre d’écoles doctorales. En vue d’un partage d’expériences, il convient d’initier un cadre d’échange où ces jeunes chercheurs et chercheuses peuvent exposer leurs travaux et bénéficier de critiques constructives de leurs homologues. C’est dans ce cadre que nous lançons les doctoriales du RESCIF.


Plus d’information ici.
 


Read more

Rob Greenfield Presents: Be The Change

Rob Greenfield

Online Event

You’re just 1 in 7 billion people in a very confusing time on Earth. Is it possible for you to make a difference? Is it worth trying? Rob Greenfield’s answer to these questions is a resounding yes and he is here to share why and how you can be the change you wish to see in the world.

Through his lead by example activism, Rob’s life has served as a wakeup call to millions of people and has changed the lives of many. Rob will share his unique projects from diving into thousands of grocery store dumpsters, to wearing his trash for 30 days, to living off the grid in a tiny house, to his most recent year of growing and foraging 100% of his food, all designed to wake people up and instigate change.

Although Rob takes his life to the extreme, his message is one of moderation. His work creates a counterbalance to the consumeristic society we live in today and encourages mainstream media to report on important issues, while being able to use his attention grabbing stories.

You will walk away from this evening with a deeper understanding of the life that you are living and with solutions you can adapt to be the change you wish to see.

Do you already have questions for Rob? Send us an e-mail, and Rob will answer your questions during his Q & A session at the end of his presentation!
qa.greenfield@gmail.com

Want to find out who Rob Greenfield is? https://www.robgreenfield.org/


Read more

CECAM-MARVEL Classics in molecular and materials modelling: Tony Ladd and Daan Frenkel

Daan Frenkel (University of Cambridge) & Tony Ladd (University of Florida)

https://epfl.zoom.us/j/69679000445
Password: 441637

Daan Frenkel (University of Cambridge) and Tony Ladd (University of Florida) will give a joint lecture in what will be the fourth event in the series "Classics in molecular and materials modelling" hosted by CECAM and MARVEL.

In this series, methods that have become fundamental tools in computational physics and chemistry will be presented by their originators at a level appropriate for master and graduate students. The lectures will be followed by an interview with the presenters: we’ll ask them to recall for us the period, problems, people and circumstances that accompanied the creation of milestone methods and algorithms that we now routinely use. 
We hope that you will be able to join us and share with us this unusual and interesting opportunity to learn first hand from pioneers who have contributed significantly to our field and to get to know better the history and anecdotes behind work that is now recorded in books. 

Program
15:00 – Introduction
15:10 – Thermodynamics of hard spheres: 1950's to 1980's (T. Ladd)
16:00 – Break
16:10 – Follow-up of the 1983 workshop (D. Frenkel)
17:00 – Interview and recollections
17:45 – End

For more information:
https://nccr-marvel.ch/events/classics-frenkel-ladd

 
Read more

Manage Your Software

Mauro Lattuada (TTO), Tomas Teijeiro (ESL)

Do you struggle with how to organise your research software? Are there any rules you should follow? Software licenses are a black box for you? How can you make your software available and visible? What are existing good practices? How can you balance open software and possible commercial use? 

During this webinar, we look at the software that is used and/or created as a part of the research process from various perspectives:


Read more

Partners in Slime: How Mucus Regulates Microbial Virulence

Katharina Ribbeck , Department of Biological Engineering at MIT
 


Read more

Virtual MEchanics GAthering -MEGA- Seminar: Elastic amplification of the Rayleigh–Taylor instability in solidifying melts

Etienne Jambon-Puillet (LElab, Princeton University)

Abstract The concomitant deformation and solidification of melts are relevant to a broad range of phenomena. Examples include glass blowing, the preparation of cotton candy, or the atomization of metals. Usually, solid-like deformations during solidification are neglected as the melt is much more malleable in its initial liquid-like form. Here we demonstrate how elastic deformations in the midst of solidification, i.e., while the melt responds as a very soft solid (G~100 Pa), can lead to the formation of previously unknown periodic structures. Namely, we generate an array of droplets on a thin layer of liquid elastomer using the Rayleigh–Taylor instability. Then, as the melt cures, we stretch the drops into hairs which eventually hardens, permanently “freezing” these elastic deformations into a patterned solid. Using experiments, simulation, and theory, we demonstrate that the formation of our two-step patterns can be rationalized when combining the tools from fluid mechanics, elasticity, and statistics.

Bio Etienne Jambon-Puillet is a postdoc in P.T. Brun's liquid & elasticity laboratory in Princeton University where he studies the mechanics of fluid interfaces and slender structures. Prior to that, Etienne got his PhD from Sorbonne Université working on the mechanical properties of dense assemblies of floating particles under the supervision of Suzie Protière and then on wetting and evaporation during his first postodc at the University of Amsterdam with Daniel Bonn.
 
Read more

SDSC Collaborative Projects - Info Day 2021



We are happy to announce our yearly information session on the Collaborative Projects of the Swiss Data Science Center (SDSC). The event will take place on Friday May 21st, as a webinar. Please find the agenda on our website. You will be able to join the webinar with the link below.

On that occasion, we will present our upcoming fifth call for Collaborative Projects. The session will start with a short talk about one of our collaborative projects from the second call. A presentation will highlight some of the current and future use cases of the knowledge graph in Renku, the SDSC platform for reproducible and reusable data science. The new collaborative projects starting this year will be briefly introduced. Finally, we will give an overview of the call itself and open the discussion.
The capacity of the event is limited to 300 participants. A recording will be made available.


Read more

Shaping physiology: from antibiotics to bioreactors

Bor Kavčič, Institute of Science and Technology Austria, candidate ELISIR 2021


Read more

MechE Colloquium: Air mediates the impact of a compliant hemisphere on a rigid smooth surface

Prof. John Kolinski, Engineering Mechanics of Soft Interfaces Laboratory (EMSI), EPFL School of Engineering (STI), Institute of Mechanical Engineering (IGM)

Abstract:
Fleeting contact between solids immersed in a fluid medium governs the response of critically important materials. Indeed, the fluid layer mediating solid contact fundamentally alters the interaction between grains of soil or coffee, directly modifying the constitutive properties of suspensions; typically this interface is obscured, making direct study of its kinematics very challenging.

Here we directly image the interface between a soft elastic hemisphere and a flat rigid substrate during rapid impact over a wide range of impact velocities $V$ at high temporal resolution using the Virtual Frame Technique (VFT). In each experiment, a pocket of air is trapped between the impactor and the substrate, preventing direct solid-solid contact at the apex of the hemisphere, and altering the area of contact. The size of the air pocket varies non-monotonically with V and impactor stiffness, initially increasing in a regime where elastic stresses balance lubrication stresses. At sufficiently large V, the inertial stress dominates the elastic stress, and the air pocket size decreases as V continues to increase. Our measurements reveal an unanticipated, sudden transition of the air pocket's size as V increases beyond ~ 1.5 m/s. Several modalities of contact front advancement emerge, and these modalities appear to correlate with the ratio of the outward velocity of the front to the Rayleigh velocity c_R of the elastic impactor. When v_out/c_R > 1, the material ahead of the advancing contact front cannot deform, and little air is entrained; however, when v_{out}/c_R < 1 the material ahead of the contact front deforms and entrains air, leading to the emergence of a patchy contact texture arising from an elasto-lubricative instability. Using the unique capabilities of the VFT, we identify several V-dependent transitions of fluid-mediated soft contact that can inform engineering design in systems as diverse as car tires, soft robotic locomotion and suspensions such as soil and coffee.

Bio:
Kolinski studied both engineering mechanics and mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and graduated with Bachelor's degrees in both subjects in 2008, before earning a Master's degree in applied mathematics (Sc.M.) and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Harvard University, in 2010 and 2013, respectively. His Ph.D. thesis on "The role of air in droplet impact on a smooth, solid surface" was supervised by Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan and Shmuel Rubinstein.[3][4][5][6][7] Supported by a Fulbright-Israel post-doctoral fellowship, he moved in 2014 to Israel to work with Eran Sharon and Jay Fineberg at the Racah Institute of Physics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. There he studied the inter-facial instabilities in fluid and solid systems such as water bells and the fracture of hydrogels.[8][9][10]
Since May 2017, Kolinski has been a Tenure Track Assistant Professor at EPFL and the head of the Laboratory of Engineering Mechanics of Soft Interfaces (EMSI) at EPFL's School of Engineering.
Read more

Niche interactions in the aging intestine

Nalle Pentinimikko, Institute of Biotechnology, HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Finland, candidate ELISIR 2021


Read more

PolyDoc Careers Seminar: Science Journalism

Hillary Sanctuary, Robin George Andrews

The PolyDoc Careers Seminar aims to expose students and postdoctoral researchers to a variety of jobs for which a science or engineering degree is highly valuable. Speakers provide personal perspective about their work, which would not be accessible otherwise, and questions are highly encouraged. The EPFL community at bachelor, master, doctoral, and postdoctoral levels are all equally encouraged to attend.

Zoom link: https://go.epfl.ch/sciencejournalism

Speaker 1 – Hillary Sanctuary, PhD (Mediacom, EPFL)

Hillary Sanctuary has a PhD in theoretical physics on the topic of modified theories of gravity. She is now a science outreach professional at EPFL, where she promotes EPFL research with media rich stories. Many of her stories have been picked up by major news outlets around the world, including Associated Press, Reuters, the BBC, Al Jazeera, etc. She has experience putting together panels of scientists to promote EPFL research – in the United States – on themes like neuroprosthetics, understanding the brain, and renewable energy. She has also worked with the EU commission in crisis communication. Follow her @_hsanctuary on Twitter or @hillarysanctuary on IG.

Speaker 2 – Robin George Andrews, PhD (science journalist)

Biography
Robin George Andrews is a volcanologist turned freelance science journalist. After a short stint in academia, he decided that telling stories about science was more entertaining than conducting science itself. Today, he mostly writes about weird rocks and strange worlds doing curious things for, among other places, The New York Times, The Atlantic, National Geographic, Scientific American, Gizmodo, Quanta Magazine and Atlas Obscura. He's also written a book about space volcanoes, out later this year. Follow him on Twitter @SquigglyVolcano.

https://robingeorgeandrews.com


Read more

Apéro-philo #4 - Une vie sans rencontrer les autres est-ce vraiment une vie?

Charles Pépin, philosophe. Modération par Anne Laure Gannac, journaliste RTS et au Collège des humanités

Depuis une année, nous apprenons à fonctionner, à travailler, à vivre chaque jour en évitant les autres. Dans ce contexte propice au repli sur soi, le risque serait d’en conclure que nous pouvons nous passer de rencontres.

Or, au contraire, aller à la rencontre des autres est un besoin existentiel. Il suffit de constater comment certaines rencontres, amoureuses ou amicales, nous donnent l’impression de renaître. Pourquoi, d’ailleurs? Que se joue t-il dans ce mouvement d’ouverture aux autres ? Qu’y gagne-t-on réellement ? Et comment se rendre disponibles à l’aventure de la rencontre? Quel est votre vécu sur ce sujet ?

Charles Pépin est agrégé de philosophie, diplômé de Sciences Po Paris et d’HEC Paris. Longtemps professeur de philosophie, il anime, depuis 2010, un séminaire philosophique hebdomadaire à Paris et tient depuis 2020 le podcast « Charles Pépin : une philosophie pratique ». Auteur de plusieurs romans et essais traduits dans plusieurs langues, il a de la philosophie une approche qui se veut accessible et pratique. Après avoir, entre autres, analysé Les vertus de l’échec et éclairé les fondements de La confiance en soi, il s’intéresse dans son nouvel essai aux forces de La rencontre, en convoquant la philosophie et les arts.

> S’inscrire pour recevoir le lien Zoom


Read more

Small changes - big impact? How Lipid diversity affects signaling

Milena Schuhmacher, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG), Dresden, Germany, candidate ELISIR 2021


Read more

On the mechanochemical principles driving cytoplasmic self-organization

Shayan Shami Pour, Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), candidate ELISIR 2021


Read more

Games on Campus – Rencontre UNIL-EPFL autour du jeu vidéo

TBA

L’objectif de ce rendez-vous régulier, né d’un intérêt conjoint d’étudiant·e·s et de chercheur·ses, est de proposer un état des lieux des activités de recherche et d’enseignement sur le campus. Qu’elles utilisent des technologies du jeu vidéo (moteurs de jeu, réalité virtuelle, gamification, etc.), ou se plongent dans l’étude de ces objets, nous souhaitons mettre en valeur les initiatives existantes et rassembler les actrices et acteurs de ce domaine présents sur le campus.

Il s'agit de la cinquième édition de l'événement. Rediffusion de la première édition. Rediffusion de la seconde édition.

Le jeu vidéo est aujourd’hui un bien culturel pratiqué ou « consommé » par une part majoritaire de la société, tous âges confondus. C’est également un savoir-faire et des technologies permettant de comprendre et maîtriser de nombreuses innovations apportées par le numérique (évolution des interfaces, intelligence artificielle, etc.), mais aussi d’appréhender les nouveaux enjeux soulevés par celui-ci. De nombreux projets en tirent parti, notamment sur le campus UNIL-EPFL (projet Collart-Palmyre, Immersive Interaction Research Group, etc.). Aujourd’hui, on trouve des centres d’étude du jeu vidéo dans des universités (Universités de Paris 8, Paris 13, Metz, CNAM-CEDRIC) comme dans des écoles polytechniques (à l’ETHZ, mais aussi à Polytechnique Paris, où une chaire « Science et jeu vidéo » a ouvert fin 2019). Lausanne étant un pôle de recherche de pointe dans les humanités numériques comme dans l’étude des nouveaux médias, il est selon nous important d’intégrer à cet ensemble le jeu vidéo, ce « média natif du numérique », et de mener une réflexion à ce propos grâce à l'organisation d'un tel événement.

Le programme sera disponible prochainement.

Cet événement a lieu uniquement en ligne.


Read more

Systems Biology of Intercellular Communication in Liver Homeostasis, Disease, and Regeneration

Nadim Aizarani, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics/University of Freiburg, Germany, candidate ELISIR 2021


Read more

Laura WALLER: End-to-end Learning for Computational Microscopy

Laura Waller, UC Berkeley, USA 

This event is part of the EPFL Seminar Series in Imaging (https://imagingseminars.org).

Abstract. Computational imaging involves the joint design of imaging system hardware and software, optimizing across the entire pipeline from acquisition to reconstruction. Computers can replace bulky and expensive optics by solving computational inverse problems.

This talk will describe end-to-end learning for development of new microscopes that use computational imaging to enable 3D fluorescence and phase measurement. Traditional model-based image reconstruction algorithms are based on large-scale nonlinear non-convex optimization; we combine these with unrolled neural networks to learn both the image reconstruction algorithm and the optimized data capture strategy.

Biography. Laura Waller is the Ted Van Duzer Endowed Associate Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Her main interests lie in the development of computational imaging methods for phase imaging, super-resolution microscopy and lensless imaging. 
Read more

coffee&LEARN: Which professional skills do students learn in engineering team-based projects?

Cyril Picard, Cécile Hardebolle, Roland Tormey, Jürg Schiffmann

When projects are used in traditional classes, students are often expected to learn professional skills such as project management or communication along with technical skills. But often only technical skills are explicitly addressed and discussed. In this coffee&LEARN session, the presenting team will talk about their recently published study which aimed at assessing professional skills. The team examined which professional skills were students developing in team-based design projects in mechanical engineering in the context of Bachelor's and Master's courses. The results highlight features of projects that seem to support student learning of professional skills more effectively than others.

Sounds interesting? To join the session, please register through this link.
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
--------------------------
The lunch&LEARN series was created by the Center LEARN to stimulate the exchange between learning science researchers and everyone at EPFL interested in teaching. Our sessions seek to either translate learning research into teaching practice or provide evidence and insights from teaching practice. Video recordings and slides from previous sessions can be found on lunch&LEARN. During this COVID-19 impacted period, we turned it into a remote session.


Read more

IMX Talks - Design and optimization of alloys for additive manufacturing

Dr. Christian Leinenbach, Empa Dübendorf

In the last couple of years, metal additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged from a mere prototyping technology to a real manufacturing technology with applications in many industry sectors (e.g. aerospace, biomedical engineering, power generation). The layer-by-layer consolidation during laser powder bed fusion or laser direct metal deposition results in unique time-temperature profiles in the materials, which can lead to out-of-equilibrium microstructures, meta-stable phases, micro-segregation and cracking. Up until now, only a small number of conventional alloys is currently used for AM. Many traditional wrought and cast alloys were not optimized for processing via AM and they might have to be optimized to make them printable. On the other hand, the special processing conditions during AM with the very rapid heating and cooling cycles and the short consolidation times can allow for the fabrication of alloys and composites that are otherwise difficult or impossible to fabricate.
In this presentation, I will talk about the material challenges in metal AM and our activities with regard to the design and optimization of structural alloys for laser-based AM technologies. In addition, I will talk about our approaches to use AM for fabricating parts with locally tailored microstructures and novel functionalities.


Read more

MechE Colloquium



Abstract:
Coming soon...

Bio:
Coming soon...
Read more

Title tba

Richard Neher , University of Basel
 


Read more

[ École d’été du Réseau d’excellence des sciences de l’ingénieur de la francophonie (RESCIF) ]



En vue d’un partage d’expériences, l’Université Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth (USJ) organise une école d’été durant la semaine du 5 au 9 juillet 2021, conçue pour offrir aux étudiants du RESCIF (dont l’EPFL fait partie) un esprit d’entreprise et pour créer des collaborations entre les étudiants de différents pays. Cette école d’été sera organisée en ligne.

Date limite d’inscription : 04 juin 2021.

Programme

  • Projet entrepreneurial ;
  • Conférences et rencontres ;
  • Visites culturelles et touristiques (virtuelles).

Éligibilité et informations générales
  • Les candidats éligibles doivent être inscrits actuellement en cursus ingénieur d’une université du RESCIF ou avoir terminé leurs études il y a moins d’un an ;
  • L’école sera en ligne ;
  • Pas de frais d’inscriptions ;
  • Les inscriptions sont individuelles. L’organisateur se chargera de former des équipes internationales et mixtes (maximum de 10 équipes, chacune composée de 5 à 7 membres) ;
  • Les confirmations d’inscription seront diffusées durant le mois de juin 2021 ;
  • Une attestation de participation sera délivrée à la fin de la semaine.


Liens utiles :

Formulaire d’inscription
Les formulaires d’inscription doivent être renvoyés, avant le 4 juin 2021, à rescif@epfl.ch.

Flyer
N’hésitez pas à disséminer cette information !

Vers la présentation de l’USJ et de l’école d’été pour plus d’informations.

Pour toutes questions, vous pouvez contacter rescif@epfl.ch.

Détails de l'événement:
Date et heure:    04.05.2021 + 04.06.2021 
Lieu et salle:    En ligne
Intervenant:    Chercheurs et Professeurs du RESCIF
 
Read more

CIS - Colloquium - by Prof. Prof Vijay Kumar, Dean School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Pennsylvania

  Prof Vijay Kumar



The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, ENAC, SB; SV and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems. In June 2020, CIS has launched its CIS Colloquia featuring invited notable speakers.
More info https://www.epfl.ch/research/domains/cis/center-for-intelligent-systems-cis/events/colloquia-2/prof-vijay-kumar/
 
Read more

Summer School: "Foundations and mathematical guarantees of data-driven control"

Prof. Claudio De Persis, Prof. Frank Allgöwer, Prof. Niao He, Prof. Nicolas Boumal, Prof. Nikolai Matni, Prof. Pietro Tesi, Dr. Stephen Tu, Prof. Marco Campi & more

The ETHZ-EPFL Summer School on "Foundations and mathematical guarantees of data-driven control" will be held from Wednesday June 9th to Tuesday June 15th, 2021, at ETH Zürich, Switzerland.
 
In this summer school we will bring together prominent researchers and students in the field of data-driven control, to discuss the latest theoretical techniques and open problems in the field, build research networks and open collaborative opportunities.
 
In this school you will learn from the following outstanding researchers:
Prof. Claudio De Persis, Prof. Frank Allgöwer, Prof. Niao He, Prof. Nicolas Boumal, Prof. Nikolai Matni, Prof. Pietro Tesi, Dr. Stephen Tu, Prof. Marco Campi & more.
 
For more information - regarding registration, the schedule, topics and more news - please visit the website
http://fmg-data-driven-control.ethz.ch/


Read more

title tba

Marta Luksza , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai


Read more

CIS - "Get to know your neighbors" Seminar series - Prof. Jürg Schiffmann

Prof. Jürg Schiffmann

The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, ENAC, SB; SV and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems.
 
In order to promote exchanges among researchers and encourage the creation of new, collaborative projects, CIS is organizing a "Get to know your neighbors" series. Each seminar will consist of one short overview presentation geared to the general public at EPFL.   
 
The CIS seminar will take place live on Zoom: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/83827841914


Please connect to your zoom account using your "@epfl.ch" address, as this live event is only open to the EPFL community
Monday, July 5th, 2021 from 3:15 to 4:15 pm
NB: Video recordings of the seminars will be made available on our website and published on our social media pages


Read more

Games on Campus – Rencontre UNIL-EPFL autour du jeu vidéo

TBA

L’objectif de ce rendez-vous régulier, né d’un intérêt conjoint d’étudiant·e·s et de chercheur·ses, est de proposer un état des lieux des activités de recherche et d’enseignement sur le campus. Qu’elles utilisent des technologies du jeu vidéo (moteurs de jeu, réalité virtuelle, gamification, etc.), ou se plongent dans l’étude de ces objets, nous souhaitons mettre en valeur les initiatives existantes et rassembler les actrices et acteurs de ce domaine présents sur le campus.

Il s'agit de la cinquième édition de l'événement. Rediffusion de la première édition. Rediffusion de la seconde édition.

Le jeu vidéo est aujourd’hui un bien culturel pratiqué ou « consommé » par une part majoritaire de la société, tous âges confondus. C’est également un savoir-faire et des technologies permettant de comprendre et maîtriser de nombreuses innovations apportées par le numérique (évolution des interfaces, intelligence artificielle, etc.), mais aussi d’appréhender les nouveaux enjeux soulevés par celui-ci. De nombreux projets en tirent parti, notamment sur le campus UNIL-EPFL (projet Collart-Palmyre, Immersive Interaction Research Group, etc.). Aujourd’hui, on trouve des centres d’étude du jeu vidéo dans des universités (Universités de Paris 8, Paris 13, Metz, CNAM-CEDRIC) comme dans des écoles polytechniques (à l’ETHZ, mais aussi à Polytechnique Paris, où une chaire « Science et jeu vidéo » a ouvert fin 2019). Lausanne étant un pôle de recherche de pointe dans les humanités numériques comme dans l’étude des nouveaux médias, il est selon nous important d’intégrer à cet ensemble le jeu vidéo, ce « média natif du numérique », et de mener une réflexion à ce propos grâce à l'organisation d'un tel événement.

Le programme sera disponible prochainement.

Cet événement a lieu uniquement en ligne.


Read more

Harald HESS: 3D Imaging of Cells by FIBSEM with Correlation to Cryo Fluorescence Microscopy

Harald Hess, HHMI’s Janelia Research Campus, USA 

This event is part of the EPFL Seminar Series in Imaging (https://imagingseminars.org).

Abstract. 3D electron microscopy data can be acquired by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) where fine sequences of 4-8 nm increments are ablated off of a sample surface and each such surface is imaged with the SEM. At the finest resolution and with month-long stable operation, comprehensive whole cells can be acquired that transcend the limited cut section views of traditional TEM used in biology.

Several examples of such data are presented along with the potential that segmentation offers to explore and formulate biological questions. Correlative microscopy can be achieved by a cryogenic protocol where samples are vitrified, imaged with PALM or SIM at low temperatures followed by EM staining and FIBSEM.  A 3D registration procedure can keep most position errors between PALM and EM data at ~ 30 nm.  Examples validating the approach with mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum labels are presented along with examples showcasing how unknown vesicle types and other structures can be identified by an associated protein.

Biography. Harald Hess is a senior group leader at HHMI’s Janelia Research Campus in the USA. His main interests lie in the development of high-throughput 3D electron microscopy and super-resolution 3D optical microscopy for use in brain connectomics and cell biology.  
Read more

CIS - "Get to know your neighbors" Seminar series - Prof. John Maddocks

Prof. John Maddocks

The Center for Intelligent Systems at EPFL (CIS) is a collaboration among IC, ENAC, SB; SV and STI that brings together researchers working on different aspects of Intelligent Systems.
 
In order to promote exchanges among researchers and encourage the creation of new, collaborative projects, CIS is organizing a "Get to know your neighbors" series. Each seminar will consist of one short overview presentation geared to the general public at EPFL.   
 
The CIS seminar will take place live on Zoom: https://epfl.zoom.us/j/62368327539


Please connect to your zoom account using your "@epfl.ch" address, as this live event is only open to the EPFL community
Monday, July 5th, 2021 from 3:15 to 4:15 pm
NB: Video recordings of the seminars will be made available on our website and published on our social media pages


Read more

From bench to bedside - a fantastic voyage of drug/device development - Europe and US

Gautam Maitra, AC Immune
Hasnaà Haddouck, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum
Norma Shafer, Steadmed Mediacal
Ary Saaman, Debiotech
Claude Amman, Amman Consulting
Ajit Simh, San Diego
Matthew Scherer, FDA - Europe Office

4-week fully online course (60-70 hours in total) jointly organized by EPFL and the College of Sciences, San Diego State University. Experienced instructors from Europe and the US will introduce you to the fundamentals of drug/device development, and the requirements for regulatory and quality compliance. You will have exposure to the requirements in Europe and the US in terms of the approach, the attitude to risk-taking, and the cultural divide.

Who can participate?

  • Members of Swiss Academic Institutions with a minimum of a Bachelor degree, in a relevant field
  • Members of early Start-ups, linked to a Swiss University, may be eligible; please contact the organizer

Practical information:
  • Starts on August 30, 2021
  • 4-weeks fully online interactive course with a total of 60-70 hours, including lectures, team-work and self-study
  • Jointly organized by EPFL and the College of Sciences, San Diego State University
  • Highly experienced instructors from Europe and US, including member of FDA
  • Pricing: EPFL members 200 CHF, non-EPFL members 400 CHF
  • Limited participants, first come first served

Why should you participate?

Advances in biotechnology, medical technology, and information technology give new hope for treating diseases never imagined before. To bring these advances from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside requires training and experience that are not available in academia, this course is intended to fill that gap.

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
  • Describe the major steps of the drug and device development process from bench to bed-side
  • Compare and contrast US and European Union regulatory and quality requirements
  • Discuss the basics of a Quality Management System
  • Develop a Product Profile for a drug/device product or therapy
  • Draft the basic components of a Development Plan for a Phase 1 clinical trial, including a pre-clinical Plan, a Clinical Trial Protocol, and CMC (Chemistry, Manufacturing and Controls) Plan
  • Work with other life science professionals on a team
  • Feel more confident about job seeking and job interviews

Read more

Title tba

Magnus Rattray, Manchester University
 


Read more

Title tba

Lucy Colwell, Cambridge University – Google
 


Read more