September 2019
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NATURE: A stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Scientists at EPFL have developed a tiny pump that could play a big role in the development of autonomous soft robots, lightweight exoskeletons and smart clothing. Flexible, silent and weighing only one gram, it is poised to replace the rigid, noisy and bulky pumps currently used. The scientists’ work has just been published in Nature.
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Smart greenhouses let you grow vegetables in your own apartment

Two EPFL Master’s students have co-developed a technology for growing a small garden right in your home or office. They launched a startup to market their smart indoor greenhouses and installed prototypes at EPFL with the support of the Act for Change LAB platform (EPFL Sustainability).
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Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body

EPFL researchers have developed biodegradable microresonators that can be heated locally with a wireless system. Doctors could soon be using them in implants to control the release of painkillers within tissue.
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Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind

EPFL scientists are investigating new ways to provide visual signals to the blind by directly stimulating the optic nerve. Their preliminary study on animals uses a new type of neural electrode and provides distinct signals.
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Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds

Researchers from EPFL and the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands have developed an extremely fast optical method for sculpting complex shapes in stem-cell-laden hydrogels and then vascularizing the resulting tissue. Their groundbreaking technique stands to change the field of tissue engineering.
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Using 3D printing to make prosthetics for Colombia war victims

Summer series – Student projects. For her Master’s project, Emylou Jaquier decided to tackle the growing problem of plastic waste. She sifted through EPFL garbage bins to collect different types of plastics and test how they could be used in 3D printing.
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Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes

EPFL scientists have developed an algorithm that can determine whether a super-resolution microscope is operating at maximum resolution based on a single image. The method is compatible with all types of microscopes and could one day be a standard feature of automated models.
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Two prestigious awards for EPFL researchers at the IEEE EMC + SIPI

During the IEEE Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility and Signal and Power Integrity, Nicolas Mora and Farhad Rachidi from the EMC Laboratory received the 2019 Motohisa Kanda Award for the most cited paper of the IEEE Transactions on EMC in the past five years. In parallel, a paper by two EPFL laboratories received the Best IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility Award.